Moths of Arkansas

Acrolophidae

Eastern Grass Tubeworm Moth (Acrolophus plumifrontella)Primary food plants: Not recorded.

Wingspan: 2.6 - 3.6 cm (approximately 1 - 1 2/5 in.)
Season: April - October
Description: The light brown forewings are mottled with darker brown and characteristically streaked with reddish coloration. Also, note the very hairy palps (upturned appendages at the front of the head in the photo above).
 

Arctiidae


Subfamily Arctiinae 

Salt Marsh Moth (Estigmene acrea) 

 

 Primary food plants: The Salt Marsh Caterpillar is a pest on a variety of plants, including cabbage, corn, clover, cotton, tobacco, peas, and apple trees.
Wingspan: 4.5 - 6.8 cm (1 3/5 - 2 7/10 in.)
Season: May - August
Description: The head, thorax, and forewings of this moth are white. Black spots are located along the costa of the forewings, and the forewings are also speckled with black. The hindwings of males are orange; females lack this orange coloration on the hindwings.

 

Isabella Tiger Moth (Pyrrharctia isabella) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae (Woolly Bears) feeds on a variety of plants, including clover, corn, birches, elms, maples, and sunflowers.
Wingspan: 4.5 - 6.5 cm (4/5 - 2 3/5 in.)
Season: April - August
Description: Indistinct, brownish antemedial, median, and postmedial lines cross the pointed, orangish forewings. A line of black spots are located near the tips of the wings.

Giant Leopard Moth (Hypercompe (=Ecpantheria) scribonia) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feeds on the leaves of a wide variety of plants, including cabbages, dandelions, maples, sunflowers, violets, and willows.
Wingspan: 5.7 - 9.1 cm (2 1/4 - 3 3/5 in.)
Season: April - September
Description: Giant Leopard Moths have white forewings with white spots encircled by bluish-black, and white hindwings with dark streaks. Yellowish droplets of liquid are sometimes seen on these moths -- these droplets are a chemical defense against predators (left photo). As the wings wear, they tend to become translucent along the outer edges (right photo).

Banded Tussock Moth (Halysidota tessellaris)  

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of many trees and shrubs, such as ashes, elms, birches, hickories, oaks, and willows.
Wingspan: 4.0 - 4.5 cm (1 9/16 - 1 3/4 in.)
Season: May - October
Description: Pale, translucent yellow wings are marked by bands of near the same color edged with black. The body is light yellowish-orange; notice the bluish-green collar and edging on the tegula (located near the base of the forewings).

Red-tailed Specter Moth (Euerythra phasma) 

 

Clymene Moth (Haploa clymene) 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on Eupatorium sp., oaks, willow trees, and other plants.
Wingspan: 4.1 - 5.6 cm (1 3/5 - 2 1/5 in.)
Season: June - August
Description: Forewings are cream-colored with a partial dark brown border extending inward as a "spur" from the inner margin of the wing.

Harnessed Tiger Moth (Apantesis phalerata) 

 

 Primary food plants: Larvae feed on a variety of plants, including corn, clover, dandelions, and plantains.
Wingspan: 3.0 - 4.2 cm (1 1/5 - 1 7/10 in.)
Season: April - September
Description: Forewing markings are variable but generally include a pale border along the leading edges and lines originating from the base of the wings and extending outward on a background of black. Female specimens usually have fewer cream-colored markings on the forewings than males. The hindwings also are variable in color and often are reddish with some black around the margins.

Banded Tiger Moth (Apantesis vittata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on low-growing plants, such as dandelions.
Wingspan: 3.2 - 4.2 cm (1 3/10 - 1 7/10 in.)
Season: March - October
Description: This species is very similar to the Harnessed Tiger Moth (Apantesis phalerata -shown in previous photo). Where both species occur, however, the Banded Tiger Moth generally has more reddish coloration and wider, more solid black edging along the margins of the hindwings.

The Neighbor (Haploa contigua) 

 

Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 3.6 - 4.9 cm (1 2/5 - 2 in.)
Season: May - August
Description: A brown line marks the leading edges of the cream to whitish-colored forewings and continues on to the anal angle. A third line extends from the bottom edge of the wing to intersect it. In addition, the inner borders of the forewings are edged with brown.

Haploa sp.  

 

Primary food plants: Larvae of the Colona Moth (Haploa colona) feed on a variety of plants, including ash, elms, hackberry, apple, and peach trees. The larvae of the Reversed Haploa (Haploa reversa) also feed on many different types of plants and are often considered to be pests on peach trees.
Wingspan: 4.0 - 5.5 cm (1 3/5 - 2 1/5 in.)
Season: April - July
Description: In order to distinguish between the two very similar species, the Colona Moth (Haploa colona) and the Reversed Haploa (Haploa reversa), the hindwings must be examined. Although the forewing patterns are frequently similar, the Colona Moth has orangish-yellow hindwings in contrast to the whitish hindwings of the Reversed Haploa.

Virgin Tiger Moth (Grammia virgo) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on Chenopodium sp., clover, plantains, lettuce, and other low-growing plants.
Wingspan: (4.5 - 7.0 cm) 1 3/4 - 2 3/4 in.
Season: June - August
Description: Black spots in the middle area of the reddish or yellow ("citrinaria" form) hindwing. Mating pair pictured here.

Fall Webworm Moth (Hyphantria cunea) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae (Fall Webworms) are pests on greater than one-hundred species of trees, including hickory, walnut, ash, and oaks.
Wingspan: 2.5 - 3.9 cm (1 - 1 3/5 in.)
Season: April - August
Description: The pattern on the white wings varies from no spots to heavy grayish-brown spotting on the forewings and one to two blackish spots on the hindwings.

Joyful Holomelina (Holomelina laeta)

Yellow-collared Scape Moth (Cisseps fulvicollis) 

 

 Primary food plants: Larvae feed on lichens, grasses, and spike-rushes.
Wingspan: 2.9 - 3.7 cm (1 1/6 - 1 1/2 in.)
Season: May - October
Description: A prominent orange collar is located at the prothorax region of the bluish-black body of this moth. Forewings are blackish, and the hindwings are translucent, with the exception of the black wing venation and black outer margins.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Lithosiinae 

Painted Lichen Moth (Hypoprepia fucosa) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on lichens.
Wingspan: 2.5 - 3.5 cm (1 - 1 2/5 in.)
Season: May - September
Description: Three broad, gray stripes mark the surface of the reddish forewings. The leading edges and inner margin of the wings are yellow. The light pink hindwings are edged with gray.

Black-and-Yellow Lichen Moth (Lycomorpha pholus) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on lichens.
Wingspan: 2.5 - 3.2 cm (1 - 1 3/10 in.)
Season: July - Sept. (day-flier)
Description: Yellowish-orange coloration is located at the base of the bluish-black forewings and hindwings. The body of this moth is black. Photograph courtesy of Dr. Jane Dunn.

Packard's Lichen Moth (Cisthene packardii) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on lichens.
Wingspan: 1.4 - 1.9 cm (11/20 - 3/4 in.)
Season: May - September
Description: A yellow line extends from the base of the gray forewings and terminates in a rounded, yellow and pink spot near the anal angle. The outer edges of the forewings are bordered with yellow, which merges into a rounded patch near the tips of the wings.

Little White Lichen Moth (Clemensia albata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on lichens.
Wingspan: 1.6 - 2.4 cm (2/3 - 1 in.)
Season: March - October
Description: White forewings are flecked with brown and black and are crossed by somewhat distinct antemedial and postmedial lines. Note the conspicuous, black inner half of the gray reniform spot.

Bombycidae

Subfamily Apatelodinae 

Spotted Apatelodes (Apatelodes torrefacta) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of trees, including oaks, maples, ashes, and species of the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 1 3/10 - 1 7/10 in. (3.2 - 4.2 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: The blackish-brown patch located at the base of the gray forewings is characteristic of this species.

Cosmopterigidae

 

Subfamily Antequerinae 

No Common Name (Euclemensia bassettella) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae parasitize scale insects.
Wingspan: 1/3 - 5/9 in. (0.9 - 1.4 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: Forewings are shiny and black with bright orange shading. Note the small, black bars located at the basal and costal areas.

No Common Name (Trinclonella pergandeella) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae are leaf miners that feed on butterfly pea and lespedeza.
Wingspan: 2/5 - 1/2 in. (1.0 - 1.3 cm)
Season: March - September
Description: Forewings are yellow with a small, black median dot and black shading located below the postmedial line.

Cossidae


Subfamily Cossinae 

Crambidae

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Crambinae 

Graceful Grass Veneer Moth

 Graceful Grass Veneer Moth (Parapediasia decorella)

 

 Elegant Grass-veneer Moth (Microcrambus elegans)

 

Elegant Grass-veneer Moth
Double-banded Grass-veneer Moth

 Double-banded Grass-veneer Moth (Crambus agitatellus)



 

Agriphila sp.

 

Agriphila sp.

 

Subfamily Evergestinae 

Large-spotted Evergestis Moth

 Large-spotted Evergestis Moth (Evergestis unimacula)

 


Subfamily Glaphyriinae 

Sooty-winged Chalcoela Moth

Sooty-winged Chalcoela Moth (Chalcoela iphitalis)

 

Julia's Dicymolomia (Dicymolomia julianalis)

 

Julia's Dicymolomia


Subfamily Nymphulinae 

Waterlily Leafcutter Moth

Waterlily Leafcutter Moth (Synclita obliteralis)

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of aquatic plants, including waterlilies, duckweed, and pondweeds.

Wingspan: 2/5 - 9/10 in. (1.0 - 2.2 cm)

Season: May - August
Description: Males and females of this species are sexually dimorphic; males are smaller and have broader wings, and the markings on the wings of females are less distinct. The wings are shaded with dark brown on a background of light brown with white lines. The white reniform spot is crescent-shaped. 


 

 

Subfamily Pyraustinae 

Mint-loving Pyrausta Moth

Mint-loving Pyrausta Moth (Pyrausta acrionalis)
Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of mint plants.
Wingspan: 3/5 - 7/10 in. (1.4 - 1.8 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: The deep rose to violet-colored forewings have yellow along the leading edge, terminal areas, antemedial and postmedial lines, and the fringes of the wings. Yellow blotches are located in the middle area of the forewings. A yellow bar is positioned at the center of the rose to gray hindwings.

 

Raspberry Pyrausta Moth (Pyrausta signatalis)
Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of Spotted Beebalm, or Horsemint.

Wingspan: 1.5 - 2.2 cm (3/5 - 9/10 in.)
Season: May - September
Description: The deep rose-colored forewings are crossed by a yellow antemedial line and a toothed, yellow postmedial line. The hindwings are yellowish-brown.

 

Raspberry Pyrausta Moth
Distinguished Colomychus

Distinguished Colomychus (Colomychus talis)

 

Eggplant Leafroller Moth (Lineodes integra)

 

Eggplant Leafroller Moth
Splendid Palpita

Splendid Palpita (Palpita magniferalis)

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of ashes.
Wingspan: 9/10 - 1 1/10 in. (2.3 - 2.7 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: The pearly translucent wings of this moth are decorated with an indistinct, black band located in the median area and with black speckling. The hindwings are brownish. 


 

Basswood Leafroller Moth (Pantographa limata)
Primary food plants: Larvae (Basswood Leafrollers) feed on the leaves of basswood and oaks.
Wingspan: 1 1/5 - 1 2/5 in. (3.0 - 3.7 cm)
Season: April - August
Description: The background color of the wings is white with yellow and brown shading. Markings include brown lines and hollow claviform, orbicular, and reniform spots.

 

Basswood Leafroller Moth
Zebra Pyralid

Zebra Pyralid (Conchylodes ovulalis)
Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 9/10 - 1 1/10 in. (2.3 - 2.8 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: Six blackish lines and a conspicuous hollow reniform spot mark the violet-tinted white wings of this moth.

 

Spotted Beet Webworm Moth (Hymenia perspectalis)
Primary food plants: Larvae (Spotted Beet Webworms) feed on a variety of plants, including beets, potatoes, amaranth, and chard.
Wingspan: 2/3 - 9/10 in. (1.6 - 2.2 cm)
Season: May - November
Description: White lines cross the dark brown forewings. Note the outward bulge at the middle of the white median line on the hindwing.

 

Spotted Beet Webworm Moth
Grape Leaffolder Moth

Grape Leaffolder Moth (Desmia funeralis)
Primary food plants: Larvae feed on evening-primrose and redbud, in addition to wild and domestic grapes.
Wingspan: 5/6 - 1 1/10 in. (2.1 - 2.8 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: The long, black forewings are narrow and pointed with two white spots on each. One large, white spot is located on the hindwing. The wings are partially fringed with white.

 

Grape Leafroller Moth (Desmia maculalis)

 

Grape Leafroller Moth 2
Checkered Apogeshna Moth

Checkered Apogeshna Moth (Apogeshna stenialis)

 

Darker Diacme Moth (Diacme adipaloides)

 

Darker Diacme Moth
Paler Diacme Moth

Paler Diacme Moth (Diacme elealis)

Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 9/10 in. (1.7 - 2.3 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Brown edging and lines decorate the yellow wings of this moth. Two large, brown spots are located at the leading edges of the forewings. 


 

Baccatalis Moth (Samea baccatalis)

 

Baccatalis Moth
Perispasta caeculalis

No Common Name (Perispasta caeculalis)
Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 9/10 in. (1.7 - 2.3 cm)
Season: April - August
Description: The outer edges of the grayish-brown forewings are indented and edged with white. These moths are sexually dimorphic; males have a white dash located in the discal are of the forewings (left photo). Females lack this marking (pictured at center and right).

 

Serpentine Webworm Moth (Herpetogramma aeglealis)

 

 Serpentine Webworm Moth
Hollow-spotted Blepharomastix Moth

Hollow-spotted Blepharomastix Moth (Blepharomastix ranalis)

 

Scraped Pilocrocis (Pilocrocis ramentalis)

 

Scraped Pilocrocis
Sericoplaga Moth

Sericoplaga Moth (Sericoplaga externalis)

 

Drepanidae


Subfamily Drepaninae 

Rose Hooktip (Oreta rosea) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of viburnums and birches.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 2/5 in. (2.5 - 3.4 cm)
Season: May - November
Description: The color of this moth is extremely variable and may range from all yellow to dull pinkish-brown. Characteristics used to distinguish this species include the hooked wingtips and the postmedial line, which angles sharply back toward the leading edges of the forewings.

 

Subfamily Thyatirinae 

Dogwood Thyatirid

Dogwood Thyatirid (Euthyatira pudens)


 

Erebidae


Subfamily Boletobiinae 

Bent-lined Tan Moth (Oxycilla malaca)

Gelechiidae


Subfamily Dichomeridinae 

Cream-bordered Dichomeris

Cream-bordered Dichomeris (Dichomeris flavocostella 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of sunflowers and goldenrods.
Wingspan: 3/5 - 7/10 in. (1.5 - 1.8 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: The purplish-black forewings are edged by a pale-colored border that terminates before reaching the wingtips. Near the postmedial area, the border projects sharply inward. 



 


Dichomeris Moth (Dichomeris glenni)

 

Dichomeris Moth


Subfamily Gelechiinae 

Coverdale's Anacampsis


Coverdale's Anacampsis (Anacampsis coverdalella)

 

Geometridae


Subfamily Ennominae 

Tulip-Tree Beauty (Epimecis hortaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of poplars, sassafras, pawpaw, and tulip-trees.
Wingspan: 1 7/10 - 2 1/5 in. (4.3 - 5.5 cm)
Season: Late March - early October
Description: The wings are usually a powdery whitish color with black zigzag lines, but the pattern may vary. Wings are broad, and hindwings are scalloped around the outer margin.

Variable Antepione (Antepione thisoaria)  

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of plants, including maple, persimmon, sumac, and apple trees.
Wingspan: 1 1/10 - 1 3/5 in. (2.7 - 4.0 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: This moth varies in color and pattern both seasonally and between sexes. To identify this species, look for the dark, triangular-shaped patch located near the tips of the forewings. Usually, some dark accents (often two spots) are positioned at the inner margin of the wing on the postmedial line. Wings vary in color from light brown to bright yellow, depending on the season.

Deep Yellow Euchlaena (Euchlaena amoenaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 1 1/5 - 2 in. (3.0 - 4.9 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Wings are straw yellow to orangish-yellow with a reddish-brown to blackish band. The area beyond the postmedial line is grayish-brown in spring specimens to rusty brown in summer specimens (middle photo). A characteristic pale yellow patch is located at the tips of the wings.

Curve-toothed Geometer (Eutrapela clematraria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of ash, basswood, birches, elms, maples, willows, and other trees.
Wingspan: 1 1/2 - 2 1/5 in. (3.8 - 5.6 cm)
Season: March - August
Description: Brownish-gray wings are mottled brown on yellowish-tan. The thin postmedial line is mostly straight, turning sharply back toward the costa. The wing tips curve inward, and the margins of the wings are gently scalloped. Females are larger than males.

Large Maple Spanworm Moth (Prochoerodes lineola (=transversata))

Juniper Geometer (Patalene olyzonria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on junipers and possibly on pines.
Wingspan: greater than 5/6 in. ( 2.1 cm)
Season: April - November
Description: A well-defined postmedial line, which hooks back toward the leading edges of the wings, is the most prominent marking on the orangish to reddish-brown forewings. The forewings of females are sharply hooked at the tips (right photo); those of males are somewhat hooked.

The Small Engrailed (Ectropis crepuscularia) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on leaves of apple, birch, elm, maple, oak, willow and other trees.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 1/2 in. (2.6 - 3.7 cm)
Season: March - September
Description: Soft brownish-gray to powdery whitish-gray wings with darker gray to blackish toothed lines, often obscure. Two distinctive, sharp blackish wedges are located on the middle portion of the forewing. Two color morphs are shown above.

Porcelain Gray (Protoboarmia porcelaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of trees, including oaks, birches, pines, and poplars.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 2/5 in. (2.5 - 3.5 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: Blackish-brown lines curve toward the leading edges of the forewings on a background of white, speckled with brown. The postmedial line is typically darkest at the veins, where it forms characteristic triangular-shaped markings that point toward the outer margins of the wings. Notice also the zigzag, white stationary line located below the postmedial line.

Canadian Melanolophia (Melanolophia canadaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of birches, elms, maples, oaks, pines, and trees of the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 1 1/10 - 1 2/5 in. (2.8 - 3.6 cm)
Season: March - September
Description: The upper surface of the wings is whitish and is speckled and mottled with brown; grayer in northern specimens. Lines are distinct when present but may be reduced to absent. Subspecies M. canadaria choctawae occurs along the coast from Maryland to Texas and tends to be larger and darker than the subspecies M. canadaria crama, which can be collected from roughly New Jersey to northern Illinois and Tennessee.

Umber Moth  (Hypomecis umbrosaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of birches and oaks.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 9/16 in. (2.6 - 4.0 cm)
Season: April - August
Description: Scalloped antemedial, postmedial, and stationary lines cross the gray background of the wings. Other wing markings include hollow, oval discal spots.

One-spotted Variant (Hypagyrtis unipunctata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of birches, hickories, oaks, pines, willows, and other trees.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 1 9/10 in. (2.0 - 4.7 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Wings of both sexes are yellowish-tan to orangish and are mottled with white, brown, and black. Forewings have a pale spot near the leading edge, and the lines and discal spots on all wings are black. The hindwings are scalloped.

Esther Moth (Hypagyrtis esther) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on pines
Wingspan: 1 - 1 3/4 in. (2.5 - 4.5 cm)
Season: May - October
Description: The coloration of this species is similar to the One-spotted Variant (Hypagyrtis unipunctata) mentioned above. The forewings of this species are not mottled, however, but are solid violet-gray with a band of reddish-brown shading located at the outer edges of the wings. Forewings have a pale, oval-shaped spot near the apex. The hindwings are scalloped.

Oak Besma (Besma quercivoraria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of oak, elm, poplar, and willow trees.
Wingspan: 1 1/10 - 1 3/5 in. (2.7 - 4.1 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Oak Besma moths are variable and differ between the sexes. The background of the wings is straw yellow and is powdered with pale brown. Veins are also pale brown. A well-defined, black discal dot is present on the forewings. Frequently, a short crossbar near the inner margin of the wing connects the orangish-brown antemedial and postmedial lines; the postmedial line continues onto the hindwing.

Dogwood Probole (Probole nyssaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of dogwoods.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 3/8 in. (2.6 - 3.5 cm)
Season: March - August
Description: The background of the wings of spring broods (left photo) is white, dusted with brown, often forming a brownish area in the center of the forewings. The dark postmedial line is strongly toothed and is indented from the leading edge of the wing to the toothed area. Beyond the postmedial line, the forewing is shaded more heavily in brown. Summer broods (right photo) have a purplish band located at the middle of the forewing and purplish-red shading beyond the postmedial line.

Yellow Slant-line (Tetracis crocallata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of alders, chestnuts, sumac, and willows.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 3/4 in. (2.5 - 4.5 cm)
Season: March - August
Description: The pale orangish-yellow to yellow wings are often dusted with brown and have black discal dots. A broad, brown postmedial line crosses the forewings from the apex to the inner margin of the wings. In the summer brood, this line continues onto the hindwing.

Confused Eusarca (Eusarca confusaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on clover, dandelions, asters, goldenrod, and other plants with composite flowers.
Wingspan: 1 1/6 - 1 3/5 in. (2.9 - 4.1 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: The yellowish-tan wings are sometimes dusted with grayish-brown, although some specimens may be mostly brown. The thin, brown postmedial line fades or hooks inward near the tips of the forewings. Notice the small, black discal dots located on the forewings and the hindwings.

Lychnosea Moth (Lychnosea intermicata) 

 

 

Thin-lined Erastria (Erastria cruentaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on blackberry plants.
Wingspan: 1 1/10 - 1 1/2 in. (2.7 - 3.7 cm)
Season: March - September
Description: The wings of spring specimens are dull gray to brown, and straw yellow to olive-colored in summer specimens. Antemedial and median lines complete or incomplete; postmedial line complete and sharply defined. The apex of the forewing is somewhat recurved.

Black-dotted Ruddy (Thysanopyga intractata)

Southern Pine Looper Moth (Caripeta aretaria)

Honest Pero (Pero honestaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on leaves of black locust and wild cherry.
Wingspan: 1 3/10 - 1 2/5 in. (3.4 - 3.6 cm)
Season: March - September
Description: The outer edges of the wings are scalloped, and the sharply defined, curving postmedial line separates areas of dark and light coloration. Males are commonly blackish-gray, and females are brown with no mottling.

Brown-shaded Gray (Iridopsis (Anacamptodes) defectaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of poplars, oaks, and willows.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 2/5 in. (2.4 - 3.6 cm)
Season: January - November
Description: Orangish-brown shading and varying amounts of gray mottling decorate the whitish background of the wings. The black antemedial and postmedial lines are distinct. Notice the scalloping of the postmedial line between the bulge and the leading edge of the forewing.

Large Purplish Gray (Iridopsis (Anacamptodes) vellivolata) 

 

 

Promiscuous Angle (Marcaria (Semiothisa) promiscuata) 

 

Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 1/10 in. (2.4 - 2.8 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: The outer edges of the pale-colored wings are edged with tan. Note the deep, brown-lined notch located below the apex of the forewings and the large, black spot located at the middle of the postmedial line. This spot is crossed horizontally by the tan postmedial line and vertically by the tan veins.

Orange Wing (Mellila xanthometata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of locust trees.
Wingspan: 2/3 - 5/6 in. (1.6 - 2.1 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: Somewhat straight lines and a black stationary spot mark the brownish to grayish forewings. The common name of this moth refers to its distinctive bright orange hindwings.

Spring Cankerworm Moth (Paleacrita vernata)

White-tipped Black (Melanchroia chephise)

White Spring Moth (Lomographa vestaliata)

Fervid Plagodis (Plagodis fervidaria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of maples, oaks, birches, ashes, sour cherry, and spruce.
Wingspan: 9/10 - 1 1/4 in. (2.3 - 3.1 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: A straight, broad postmedial line crosses the yellowish wings. The forewings of summer broods are heavily shaded with gray. The wings of spring broods are decorated by indistinct, vertical brown streaks.


Subfamily Geometrinae 

Showy Emerald

Showy Emerald (Dichorda iridaria) Primary Food Plants: Caterpillars feed on staghorn and winged sumac.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 1 1/5 in. (2.0 - 3.0 cm)
Season: April - August
Description: Body and wing color varies from pale to deep green. Wings have wide, straight, white lines and black distal dots.

 

Red-Bordered Emerald (Nemoria lixaria) Primary food plants: Caterpillars feed on the leaves of red oaks.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 1 1/5 in. (2.0 - 3.0 cm)
Season: March - June; all year in deep South
Description: Wings are green with a pair of jagged white lines, and red lines extend around the margins. The fringe on the edges of the wings is checkered red and white, and the green abdomen has white spots ringed with red. Melanic specimens are brownish green and have dark brown lines and fringe.

 

Red-Bordered Emerald
White-fringed Emerald

White-fringed Emerald (Nemoria mimosaria) Description: Concave, white antemedial and postmedial lines cross the greenish- colored wings. The wings are fringed with white and lack the red terminal line seen in some of the other emerald species. Also, notice the white dot on the first abdominal segment, followed by a green segment, then segments with white coloration, which is characteristic of this species of emerald.

 

Red-fringed Emerald (Nemoria bistriaria) - brown spring forms shown above green summer forms Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of white oaks.
Wingspan: about 2.2 cm (about 9/10 in.)
Season: March - October
Description: The wings of summer broods are green with white antemedial and postmedial lines. Spring forms are usually brown in coloration. The white circles ringed with brown located on the abdomen are characteristic of this species. Note also the red terminal line and pink and white checkered fringes.

 

Red-fringed Emerald
Southern Emerald

Southern Emerald (Synchlora frondaria) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of plants, including blackberries and chrysanthemums.
Wingspan: Less than 1 in. (2.5 cm)
Season: March - October
Description: Notice the jagged, white postmedial line, which crosses the pale green wings, and the white stripe located on the green abdomen of this moth.

 

Wavy-lined Emerald (Synchlora aerata) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on a variety of plants, including coreopsis, coneflowers, asters, ragweeds, and raspberry fruits.
Wingspan: 1/2 - 1 in. (1.3 - 2.4 cm)
Season: May - October
Description: Slightly toothed, white lines curve outward across the pale green forewings and continue onto hindwings of the same color. Note also the white stripe located on the green abdomen.

 

Wavy-lined Emerald
Blackberry Looper Moth

Blackberry Looper Moth (Chlorochlamys chloroluecaria) Primary food plants: Larvae (Blackberry Loopers) feed on blackberry fruits, the petals of various composite flowers, coneflowers, sunflowers, and ox-eye daisies.
Wingspan: 3/5 - 9/10 in. (1.4 - 2.3 cm)
Season: April - November
Description: Grayish-green wings fade to yellowish. The leading edge of the wings and the antemedial and the straight postmedial lines are cream-colored. Males have bipectinate (feather-like) antennae.

 

 

Subfamily Larentiinae 

The Bad-Wing

 The Bad-Wing (Dyspteris abortivaria) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on grapes.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 1 1/10 in. (2.0 - 2.8 cm)
Season: March - August
Description: The wings are pale bluish-green with white lines and discal spots. Hindwings are much smaller than the forewings.

 

 The Beggar (Eubaphe mendica) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of maples and violets.
Wingspan: 5/6 - 1 1/5 in. (2.1 - 3.0 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Two, irregular lines of fused, bluish-gray spots cross the translucent, pale yellow forewings. A single, bluish-gray spot is located at the center of the forewings along the outer margin.

 

The Beggar
Somber Carpet

Somber Carpet (Disclisioprocta stellata)

Ferguson's Scallop Shell (Rheumaptera prunivorata)

Ferguson's Scallop Shell
Brown Bark Carpet

Brown Bark Carpet (Horisme intestinata)

Bent-line Carpet (Costaconvexa (Orthonama) centrostrigaria) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of low-growing plants, including smartweed and knotweed.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 9/10 in. (1.7 - 2.3 cm)
Season: March - November
Description: The background of the wings is pale gray with several fine, broken, dotted, or scalloped lines. The middle area of the forewings of males is defined by a wide, black antemedial line and curved upper half of the postmedial line; the lower half is absent (pictured top, left). Small, black discal dots are present on forewings and hindwings.

 

Bent-line Carpet
The Gem

The Gem (Orthonama obstipata) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a wide variety of plants, including elms, ragworts, and chrysanthemums.
Wingspan: 3/5 - 7/8 in. (1.5 - 2.2 cm)
Season: March - October
Description: Adult males are pale brown with a darker band of color across the center of the wings (right photo). The more darkly colored females may be distinguished from males by the presence of a small, black discal dot encircled by white located within the darker band on the forewings (middle and left photos).

 

Common Epithecia (Epithecia miserulata)

 

Common Epithecia

 

Subfamily Sterrhinae 

Large Lace-Border

Large Lace-Border (Scopula limboundata) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of plants, including apple trees, blueberries, clovers, dandelions, wild cherry trees.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 1 1/5 in. (2.0 - 3.0 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: Yellowish to tan lines, the postmedial line being the most noticeable, decorate the cream to yellowish wings. In the typical form, there is much black shading located beyond the postmedial line (seen above, right photo). Black shading on other forms is reduced to absent.

 

Cross's Wave Moth (Leptostales crossii)

 

Cross's Wave Moth
Packard's Wave Moth

Packard's Wave Moth (Cyclophora packardi)

 

Red-bordered Wave (Idaea demissaria) 

Red-bordered Wave
Wave Moth

Wave Moth (Idaea furciferata)

 

Diminutive Wave Moth (Idaea scintillularia)

 

Diminutive Wave Moth
Stained Lophosis Moth

Stained Lophosis Moth (Lophosis labeculata)

 

Lasiocampidae


Subfamily Lasiocampinae 

Eastern Ten Caterpillar Moth (Malacosoma americanum) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of shrubs and trees, including members of the rose family (Rosaceae) such as apple and cherry trees.
Wingspan: 2.2 - 4.4 cm (9/10 - 1 3/4 in.)
Season: May - June
Description: Forewings are warm brown with whitish-colored antemedial and postmedial lines. Occasionally, the median area is white; the body is brown.

Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth (Malacosoma disstria) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of shrubs and trees, including maple trees.
Wingspan: 2.3 - 3.7 cm (9/10 - 1 1/2 in.)
Season: April - September
Description: Forewings vary in color from yellowish to reddish-brown. Some specimens display brown antemedial and postmedial lines and brown shading in the median area (as seen in the above photo).

 

Subfamily Macromphaliinae 

Small Tolype

Small Tolype (Tolype notialis)  

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on conifers.
Wingspan: 2.6 - 3.9 cm (1 - 1 5/9 in.)
Season: May - September
Description: Wings vary in color from light to dark, charcoal gray and are marked by a wavy postmedial line. The body of this moth is very hairy. Notice the coloring at the anterior end of the moth: the head is white, the front and sides of the thorax are white, and the center of the thorax is black. The abdomen ranges in color from white to gray. 


 

LargeTolype (Tolype velleda) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of trees, including birch, plum, apple, oak, elm, and ash.
Wingspan: 3.2 - 5.8 cm (1 1/4 - 2 3/10 in.)
Season: September - October
Description: The body of the Large Tolype is very hairy, and the wings range in color from pale to dark gray. Although the coloration is similar to the Small Tolype (Tolype notialis)- see previous species, the two moths differ in size and in the markings of the postmedial line. The postmedial line of the Large Tolype is nearly straight, as compared to the very wavy postmedial line of the Small Tolype. 



 

LargeTolype
Dot-lined White

Dot-lined White (Artace cribraria) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of roses, oaks, and members of the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 2.5 - 6.2 cm (1 - 2 1/2 in.)
Season: May - October
Description: A series of black dots decorate the white wings of this moth. The body is also white.

 

Family Limacodidae

Crowned Slug Moth (Isa textula) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of trees and shrubs, including maples, elms, oaks, and hickories.
Wingspan: 1.7 - 2.5 cm (2/3 - 1 in.)
Season: May - August
Description: Coloration is pale brownish with no prominent markings.


Subfamily Limacodinae 

 Skiff Moth

Skiff Moth (Prolimacodes badia) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of plants, including oaks, willows, birches, blueberries, poplars, and members of the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 2/5 in. (2.4 - 3.5 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: The distinguishing characteristic of this species is the dark brown, semicircular patch that extends from the leading edge to near the inner edge of the forewings. The lower margin of this patch is bordered by white. Hindwings are brown.

 

Shagreened Slug Moth

Shagreened Slug Moth (Apoda biguttata) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of oaks and hickories.
Wingspan: 3/4 - 1 1/5 in. (1.9 - 3.0 cm)
Season: April - August
Description: Forewings are brownish-colored at the base and grayish-brown in the median area, and the two areas are separated by a yellowish median line. Note the dark brown patches ringed with yellow located on the inner margin and at the apex of the forewings.

 

Apoda y-inversum

No Common Name (Apoda y-inversum) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of oaks, ironwood, beeches and hickories.
Wingspan: 5/6 - 1 1/5 in. (2.1 - 3.0 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: Dark brown antemedial and postmedial lines cross the orangish-yellow forewings. An "X" is formed by two thinner lines located near the inner edge of the forewings.

 

Nason's Slug Moth

Nason's Slug Moth (Natada nasoni)

 

Yellow-collared Slug Moth

Yellow-collared Slug Moth (Lithacodes fasciola) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on a variety of trees and shrubs, including hickories, oaks, willows, apples, and elms.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 1 in. (1.8 - 2.5 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: A toothed, white postmedial line highlighted by gray and brown shading contrasts with the orangish-brown background of the forewings. The stationary line curves from the upper portion of the postmedial line to the outer edge of the forewings.

 

Spiny Oak-slug Moth (Euclea delphinii) Primary food plants: Larvae (Spiny Oak-slugs) feed on the leaves of a variety of woody plants, including apple trees, maples, oaks, sycamores, willows, and members of the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 3/4 - 1 1/4 in. (1.9 - 3.1 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: Green patches, which may be large (as shown in the left photo) or almost absent, decorate the middle area of the brown forewings. Varying amounts of orangish to purplish shading are usually present. Notice also the small, brownish to blackish discal streak. The hindwings are brown.

 

 Hag Moth

Hag Moth (Phobetron pithecium) Primary food plants: Larvae (Monkey Slugs) feed on the leaves of a variety of woody plants, including apple trees, dogwoods, oaks, persimmons, willows, and birches.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 1 1/10 in. (2.0 - 2.8 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: This species is sexually dimorphic. The forewings of males are translucent with black veins, discal dots, edging, and lines. Hindwings are edged with black along the inside margins. The yellow and brown forewings of females are decorated with black discal dots and irregular lines. Hindwings are black. The body of both sexes is black.

 

 Saddleback Caterpillar Moth

Saddleback Caterpillar Moth (Acharia (=Sibine) stimulea)

 

Smaller Parasa (Parasa chloris
 

Family Lymantriidae


Subfamily Lymantriinae 

Southern Tussock Moth (Dasychira meridionalis)

Tephra Tussock Moth (Dasychira tephra)

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Orgyiinae 

White-marked Tussock Moth

 White-marked Tussock Moth (Orgyia leucostigma)

 

Family Lymantriidae

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Lymantriinae 

Southern Tussock Moth (Dasychira meridionalis)

Tephra Tussock Moth (Dasychira tephra)

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Orgyiinae 

White-marked Tussock Moth

 White-marked Tussock Moth (Orgyia leucostigma)

 

Family Megalopygidae

Black-waved Flanned Moth (Megalopyge (=Lagoa) crispata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of various shrubs and trees, including blackberry, oaks, sassafras, willows, apple trees, birches, poplars, and members of the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 3/5 in. (2.5 - 4.0 cm)
Season: May - October
Description: The body is covered with yellowish-cream hair. Wings also are light yellowish-cream and are marked by distinct, black, wavy lines on a background of varying amounts of brownish shading.

Southern Flannel Moth (Megalopyge opercularis)

White Flannel Moth (Norape ovina)

Nolidae

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Acontiinae 

Common Spragueia

Common Spragueia (Spragueia leo) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of bindweed.
Wingspan: 1/2 - 7/10 in. (1.2 - 1.8 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: Alternating black and yellow bars are located at the outer edge of the forewings, and a black dash, which widens near the wingtips, is positioned at the middle area of the wings. The terminal line is black except at the interior edge.

 

Southern Spragueia (Spragueia dama) 

 

Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 3/5 - 2/3 in. (1.5 - 1.6 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: The brightly colored orange, yellow, and black forewings of this moth are marked by yellow in the upper basal area and by black in the lower basal area of the wings. Notice the black spot located at the outer edge of the forewings. Hindwings are grayish-brown.

Southern Spragueia

Exposed Bird-Dropping Moth  

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of hollyhocks.
Wingspan: 3/5 - 1 1/6 in. (1.5 - 2.9 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: The forewings of males and females differ in markings. Forewings of males (left photo) are white with two dark-colored patches located on the leading edges of the wings, with the lower patch merging with the shading at the bottom of the wings. The forewings of females (right photo) are mostly dark-colored with the exception of two white patches positioned on the leading edges of the wings. Wings of females also have a small amount of white at the base and outer margins. A noticeable black orbicular dot is present on the wings of both sexes.
 

Curve-lined Acontia (Acontia terminimuculata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of basswood.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 1/10 in. (2.5 - 2.8 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: The primary distinguishing characteristic of this species is the curved lower postmedial line. Below the postmedial line, the forewings are shaded with a mixture of dark reddish-brown and gray. The median area of males is the same light gray color as the basal area (seen in photos to far right). The median area of the forewings of females, however, is darker than the basal area (pictured in left photos). The color of the hindwings differs between sexes: forewings of males are dingy whitish, and those of females are grayish-brown.


 

Olive-shaded Bird Dropping Moth

Olive-shaded Bird Dropping Moth (Tarachidia candefacta)

 

Subfamily Acronictinae 

The Hebrew

The Hebrew (Polygrammate hebraeicum) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of black gum trees.
Wingspan: 9/10 - 1 3/5 in. (2.3 - 3.9 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: The white forewings are marked by black spots and broken lines. White hindwings are shaded with brown.

 

Harris's Three-Spot (Harrisimemna trisignata)  

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on woody plants, including willows, holly, and apple trees.
Wingspan: 1 1/5 - 1 2/5 in. (3.0 - 3.6 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: White forewings are shaded with gray and marked by broken black lines. Distinguishing characters include three large, round, reddish spots located at the base and at the outer edges of the wings.

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harris's Three-Spot
Green Marvel Moth

Green Marvel Moth (Agriopodes fallax)

 

Delightful Dagger Moth (Acronicta vinnula) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of elms.
Wingspan: 1 1/10 - 1 3/10 in. (2.8 - 3.2 cm)
Season: April - August
Description: The coloration of the forewings is variable and may be mottled light or dark gray or green. Generally, the postmedial line straightens as it approaches the inner margin of the forewing. Other wing characters include white shading along the postmedial line and also within the orbicular spot.

 

Delightful Dagger Moth
Ochre Dagger Moth

Ochre Dagger Moth (Acronicta morula)

 Speared Dagger Moth (Acronicta hasta)

 

Speared Dagger Moth

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Agaristinae 

Pearly Wood-Nymph

Pearly Wood-Nymph (Eudryas unio) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of evening primrose, hibiscus, grapes, and willow-herbs.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 2/5 in. (2.6 - 3.5 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: The outer edge of the white area on the forewings is scalloped. A broad, even brown border is located along the bottom edge of the yellow hindwings. When these moths are at rest, the wings are rolled. The pattern of light and dark on the folded wings resembles bird droppings

 

Beautiful Wood Nymph (Eudryas grata)

 

Beautiful Wood Nymph
Eight-spotted Forester Moth

Eight-spotted Forester Moth (Alypia octomaculata 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Amphipyrinae 

Copper Underwing

Copper Underwing (Amphipyra pyramidoides)
 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Bagisarinae 

Straight Lined Mallow Moth

Straight Lined Mallow Moth (Bagisara rectifascia) 

Subfamily Condicinae 

Common Pinkband

Common Pinkband (Ogdoconta cinereola) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of beans, ragweed, artichokes, and sunflowers.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 9/10 in. (2.0 - 2.3 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: A wide, light pink band crosses the grayish-brown forewings, which are decorated with thin, white markings. Hindwings are grayish-brown.

 

Dusky Groundling Moth (Condica vecors)

 

Dusky Groundling Moth
Black Wedge-spot

Black Wedge-spot (Homophoberia apicosa) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of lady's thumb.
Wingspan: 7/8 - 1 3/10 in. (2.2 - 3.2 cm)
Season: March - October
Description: A cream to pinkish-tan reniform spot and stationary area, in addition to a dark, black wedge-shaped claviform spot, mark the darkly colored forewings. Notice also the conspicuous cream-colored spot located on the thorax area of the body. The whitish hindwings are shaded with grayish-brown.

 

Marbled-green Leuconycta

Marbled-green Leuconycta (Leuconycta lepidula) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on dandelions.
Wingspan: --
Season: April - August
Description: Forewings are mottled grayish-brown and black with an olive tint. Conspicuous markings include a black patch near the base of the costa and an inverted, black triangular patch located midway along the costa. The dark gray hindwings are fringed with dark and pale-colored scales.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Eriopinae 

Silver-spotted Fern Moth (Callopistria cordata) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on ferns.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 1/10 in. (2.5 - 2.8 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: Warm brown-toned forewings are decorated with large, silver spots and silver antemedial and postmedial lines.

 

Silver-spotted Fern Moth

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Eustrotiinae 

Tufted Bird-Dropping Moth

Tufted Bird-Dropping Moth (Cerma cerintha) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on plants belonging to the rose family (Rosaceae), such as roses, wild cherry, apple, peach, and plum trees.
Wingspan: 1 1/10 - 1 3/10 in. (2.8 - 3.3 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: Lines and shading on the white background of the wings are black, olive green, gray, and reddish brown. The kidney-shaped (reniform) spot on the wings is white with some olive green shading on the interior. Dark-colored tufts are located on the upper side of the abdomen.

 

White-lined Graylet

White-lined Graylet (Hyperstrotia villificans)

 

Tripudia Moth (Tripudia balteata)

 

Tripudia Moth

The White-Edge (Oruza albocostaliata)
Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 5/6 in. (1.8 - 2.1 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Broad, pale yellowish to reddish-brown forewings are marked by a white band along the leading edges. The pale colored postmedial line continues from the forewings to the hindwings. Note also the prominent white collar and the small body of this species.

 

Pink-barred Lithacodia

Pink-barred Lithacodia (Pseudeustrotia (=Lithacodia) carneola)
Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of goldenrod and smartweed.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 1 in. (2.0 - 2.4 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: Forewings are dark brown with pale tan located in the stationary area. A distinguishing characteristic of this species is the pinkish-white bar that crosses the forewings from the leading edge to near the inner edge. The hindwings are gray.

 

Black-bordered Lemon Moth (Thioptera nigrofimbria) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on crabgrass and morning-glories.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 7/8 in. (1.8 - 2.2 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: Forewings are lemon yellow with a blackish border along the outer margin. The yellow hindwings are shaded with pale grayish-brown along the outer edges.

 

Black-bordered Lemon Moth

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Hadeninae 

Armyworm Moth

Armyworm Moth (Mythimna (= Pseudaletia) unipuncta) Primary food plants: Larvae (armyworms) are pests of a variety of plants, including grasses, grains, vegetables, young fruit trees and ornamentals, and many wild plants, as well.
Wingspan: 1 3/8 - 1 9/10 in. (3.5 - 4.7 cm)
Season: March - November
Description: The tan-colored forewings are often tinged with orange and lightly speckled with black. Veins on the forewings are white, and the postmedial line consists of a series of small black dots spaced widely apart. A characteristic black shade line slants inward from the tips of the wings. Hindwings are grayish brown with tan fringe along the outer edges.

 

Confused Woodgrain (Morrisonia confusa)

 

Confused Woodgrain
 Garman's Quaker

Garman's Quaker (Orthosia garmani)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Heliothinae 

Corn Earworm Moth

Corn Earworm Moth (Heliothis zea) Primary food plants: Larvae (Corn Earworms) are pests on corn, tobacco, tomatoes, cotton, and a variety of other plants. Corn Earworms are sometimes seen at the end of a corncob when peeling back the husks.
Wingspan: 1 3/10 - 1 3/4 in. (3.2 - 4.5 cm)
Season: May - December
Description: The yellowish-tan forewings are decorated with variable markings and shading. A pale-colored patch located at the bottom of the hindwing toward the center is surrounded by a dark-colored border and veins.

 

Lynx Flower Moth (Schinia lynx) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of fleabane.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 7/8 in. (1.8 - 2.2 cm)
Season: May - July
Description: The colors and markings on the wings of this moth are extremely variable. Forewings may be olive to olive-brown with orangish-yellow located in the median area and at the outer edges of the wings. Hindwings are often yellow.

 

Lynx Flower Moth
Ragweed Flower Moth

Ragweed Flower Moth (Schinia rivulosa)

 

Three-lined Flower Moth (Schinia trifascia

 

Three-lined Flower Moth

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Noctuinae 

Green Cutworm Moth

Green Cutworm Moth (Anicla infecta) Primary food plants: Larvae (Green Cutworms) are pests on beets, tobacco, clover, grasses, and other low-growing plants.
Wingspan: 1 1/5 - 1 9/16 in. (3.0 - 4.0 cm)
Season: June - November
Description: The terminal edges of the violet-gray forewings are edged with dark red. Lines are inconspicuous, and the reniform spot is outlined in white and contains black and red spots.

 

Variegated Cutworm Moth (Peridroma saucia)

 

Variegated Cutworm Moth
Bent-line Dart

 Bent-line Dart (Choephora fungorum)
 

Pale-banded Dart (Agnorisma (=Xestia) badinodis)

 

Pale-banded Dart
Venerable Dart Moth

Venerable Dart Moth (Agrotis venerabilis)

 

Swordsman Dart (Agrotis gladiaria)

 

Swordsman Dart

Ipsilon Dart (Agrotis ipsilon)

 

Ipsilon Dart
Subterranean Dart

Subterranean Dart (Agrotis subterranea)

 

Dull Reddish Dart (Xestia dilucida) 

Dull Reddish Dart

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Pantheinae 

Eastern Panthea

Eastern Panthea (Panthea furcilla)
Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of pines and spruces.
Wingspan: 1 3/10 - 2 in. (3.3 - 5.0 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: Gray-shaded forewings are crossed by black lines. The stationary and postmedial lines meet near the inside edge of the forewings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Plusiinae 

Bilobed Looper Moth

Bilobed Looper Moth (Megalographa (=Autographa) biloba) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on low-growing plants, including cabbage and alfalfa.
Wingspan: 1 3/10 - 1 9/16 in. (3.4 - 4.0 cm)
Season: March - November
Description: The primary characteristic used to identify these moths is the presence of large, bilobed stigmas located on each of the forewings. The pale brown forewings are shaded with dark, metallic brown and are decorated with silver antemedial and postmedial lines and a partial reniform spot. The hindwings are grayish-brown.

 

Soybean Looper Moth (Pseudoplusia includens)

Soybean Looper Moth

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Psaphidinae 

 Spotted Phosphila

Spotted Phosphila (Phosphila miselioides)

Fawn Sallow (Psaphida (=Copipanolis) stryacis)

Fawn Sallow

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Rivulinae 

Yellow-lined Owlet

Yellow-lined Owlet (Colobochyla interpuncta) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on persimmon trees.
Wingspan: 4/5 - 1 in. (2.0 - 2.4 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Three yellow lines cross the brown forewings. The postmedial and median lines are edged with darker brown and curve outward; the postmedial line reaches the tip of the forewing. Often, the antemedial line is obscure. Orbicular and reniform spots are black, and the hindwings are grayish-brown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Stiriinae 

Obtuse Yellow

Obtuse Yellow (Azenia (=Stiriodes) obtusa)
Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 1 in. (1.8 - 2.5 cm)
Season: June - August
Description: A distinguishing characteristic of this species is the three large, brownish spots located on the leading edges of the yellow forewings. Two smaller spots are also often present.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Xyleninae 

Chalcedony Midget

Chalcedony Midget (Elaphria chalcedonia)
 

Grateful Midget (Elaphria grata)

 

Grateful Midget

Scalloped Sallow (Eucirroedia pampina)

 

Family Nolidae

  

  

  

  

   

 Subfamily Chloeporinae 

Frigid Owlet

Frigid Owlet (Nycteola frigidana)
Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of willows and poplars.
Wingspan: 7/8 - 1 in. (2.2 - 2.5 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: The long, narrow, gray forewings appear shiny and are decorated with an irregular, black stationary line. Hindwings are gray.

  

  

  

  

   

 Subfamily Nolinae 

Sharp-blotched Nola (Nola pustulata) 

 

Primary food plants: Unrecorded.
Wingspan: --
Season: May - July
Description: A well-defined blackish patch is located at the center of the white forewings and surrounds the metallic black orbicular and reniform spots.
 

 

Ashy Meganola (Meganola spodia) 

 

 

Meganola sp.

  

  

  

  

   

 Subfamily Risobinae 

Eyed Baileya (Baileya ophthalmica) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on beech and ironwood trees.
Wingspan: 9/10 - 1 3/10 in. (2.3 - 3.2 cm)
Season: April - July
Description: The apex of the gray forewings is marked with a sharply defined, broken, black patch. A large reniform spot outlined in black is located at the center of the forewings, and a conspicuous white patch is located at the base. Whitish hindwings are shaded darker toward the outer edges.

Sleeping Baileya (Baileya dormitans)

Family Notodontidae

  

  

  

  

   

 Subfamily Heterocampinae 

Pink Prominent Moth (Hyparpax aurora) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of viburnums and scrub oaks.
Wingspan: 1 1/5 - 1 2/5 in. (3.0 - 3.6 cm)
Season: April - September; *Reported as uncommon to rare by Dr. Charles Covell, Jr.
Description: The forewings of the pink prominent moth are pink with a yellow median area and some yellow shading along the leading edges of the wings.

Mottled Prominent (Macrurocampa marthesia) 

 

 

Wavy-lined Heterocampa (Heterocampa biundata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on a variety of trees, including willows, birches, hickories, and maples.
Wingspan: 1 1/2 - 2 1/4 in. (3.8 - 5.6 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: The green forewings, fading to yellowish-brown, are marked by a distinct pattern of doubled, black, scalloped antemedial and postmedial lines filled in with orange. The stationary line is composed of a row of black wedges. Hindwings are gray.
 

White-blotched Heterocampa (Heterocampa umbrata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of oaks.
Wingspan: 1 7/10 - 2 1/2 in. (4.2 - 6.2 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: The forewings are colored with brown, white, and dark green mottling and a white patch near the tips of the wings. The row of black wedges near the lower edges of the wings is a character of this species.

Double-lined Prominent (Lochmaeus bilineata) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of oaks, linden, beech, basswood, elms, and birches.
Wingspan: 1 1/4 - 1 3/5 in. (3.2 - 4.0 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: The middle portion of the forewings, called the median area, is a slightly darker shade of brown than the background of the forewings. Notice the two concave areas of the distinct postmedial line.

Drab Prominent (Misogada unicolor)

  

  

  

  

   

Subfamily Notodontinae 

White Furcula (Furcula borealis) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of wild cherry, poplars, and willows.
Wingspan: 1 1/4 - 1 7/10 in. (3.1 - 4.2 cm)
Season: April - August
Description: Basal, stationary, and terminal lines are comprised of a series of black dots on the white background of the forewings. Gray bands cross the forewings at the median and upper stationary areas.

Gray Furcula (Furcula cinerea)

Common Gluphisia

Common Gluphisia (Gluphisia septentrionis)
 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of poplars.
Wingspan: 1 - 1 3/10 in. (2.5 - 3.3 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: The forewings are dark gray with white antemedial and stationary areas. Notice the two loops filled with brown located at the base of the wings. Other characteristics of this species include the zigzag postmedial line and somewhat straight antemedial line.

Georgian Prominent (Hyperaeschra georgica)

  

  

  

  

   

 Subfamily Nystaleinae 

White -headed Prominent (Symmerista albifrons)

  

  

  

  

   

 Subfamily Phalernae 

Linden Prominent (Ellida caniplaga) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of linden.
Wingspan: 1 2/5 - 1 4/5 in. (3.4 - 4.4 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: Pale gray forewings are mottled with brown and white in the lower basal, central, and upper stationary areas. The black, crescent-shaped reniform spot is outlined in white. Lines are black and sharply defined, and the antemedial line consists of three lines directed toward the leading edges of the forewings.

White-dotted Prominent (Nadata gibbosa) 

  

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of various trees, including maples, oaks, cherries, birches, and plums.
Wingspan: 11/2 - 2 9/25 in. (3.8 - 5.9 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: Conspicuous yellowish antemedial and postmedial lines cross yellow forewings with orangish to brownish tones. A pair of white dots located within the reniform spot are characteristic of this species.

Yellow-necked Caterpillar Moth (Datana ministra)

Angulose Prominent (Peridea angulosa)

Family Oecophoridae

No Common Name (Antaeotricha leucillana) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a variety of trees, including basswood, ashes, birches, maples, elms, oaks, willows, and poplars.
Wingspan: 3/5 - 9/10 in. (1.5 - 2.3 cm)
Season: April - August
Description: Forewings are white with a gray patch positioned near the inner margin of the wings. The brownish scale tuft located on the thorax is lighter than that of the similar species, Antaeotricha schlaegeri (described and pictured above).

No Common Name (Antaeotricha schlaegeri)

  

  

  

  

   

 Subfamily Depressariinae 

Dotted Psilocorsis Moth (Psilocorsis reflexella)

  

  

  

  

   

 Subfamily Oecophorinae 

Black-marked Inga Moth (Inga sparsiciliella)

Family Psychidae

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Oiketicinae 

Evergreen Bagworm Moth

Evergreen Bagworm Moth (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) - male Primary food plants: Larvae (Evergreen Bagworms) feed on a variety of trees, shrubs, and other plants. Larval cases are often noticed attached to ornamental plants; cases consist of silken threads with bits of debris attached, such as fragments of leaves and twigs.
Wingspan: 1.7 - 3.6 cm (2/3 - 1 2/5 in.)
Season: August - October
Description: The body of male Evergreen Bagworm Moths is black and tapering, and the wings usually appear to be translucent, as most of the scales are lost as the male emerges from his larval case. The female lacks wings and never leaves her case. Instead, she releases pheromones, which attract a male. Following the arrival of a male bagworm, the male inserts his abdomen into her case to mate. Eggs also are laid inside the female's larval case.
 

Family Psychidae

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Oiketicinae 

Evergreen Bagworm Moth

Evergreen Bagworm Moth (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) - male Primary food plants: Larvae (Evergreen Bagworms) feed on a variety of trees, shrubs, and other plants. Larval cases are often noticed attached to ornamental plants; cases consist of silken threads with bits of debris attached, such as fragments of leaves and twigs.
Wingspan: 1.7 - 3.6 cm (2/3 - 1 2/5 in.)
Season: August - October
Description: The body of male Evergreen Bagworm Moths is black and tapering, and the wings usually appear to be translucent, as most of the scales are lost as the male emerges from his larval case. The female lacks wings and never leaves her case. Instead, she releases pheromones, which attract a male. Following the arrival of a male bagworm, the male inserts his abdomen into her case to mate. Eggs also are laid inside the female's larval case.
 

Family Pyralidae

  

  

  

  

   

Subfamily Chrysauginae 

Boxwood Leaftier (Galasa nigrinodis)

Parachma Moth (Parachma ochrecealis)

Olive Arta Moth (Arta olivalis)

Posturing Arta Moth (Arta statalis)

Dimorphic Tosale Moth (Tosale oviplagalis)

Trumpet Vine Moth (Clydonopteron sacculana) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on trumpet creeper.
Wingspan: 3/5 - 1 in. (1.5 - 2.5 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: The leading edges of the brownish-red forewings are wavy, and the forewings are shaded with orange to the postmedial line. Note the white dash located at the top of the postmedial line.
 

  

  

  

  

   

Subfamily Epipaschiinae 

Dimorphic Macalla Moth (Macalla (=Epipaschia) superatalis)

Zeller's Epipaschia Moth (Macalla (=Epipaschia) zelleri)

Orange-tufted Oneida Moth (Oneida Iunualis)

Tallula sp.

Double-humped Pocoera Moth (Pococera expandens)

  

  

  

  

   

Subfamily Galleriinae 

No Common Name (Omphalocera cariosa)

  

  

  

  

   

Subfamily Peoriinae 

Carmine Snout Moth (Peoria aproimella)

Long-palps Peoria Moth (Peoria longipalpella)

  

  

  

  

   

Subfamily Phycitinae 

American Plum Borer (Euzophera semifuneralis)

  

  

  

  

   

Subfamily Pyralinae 

Yellow-frindged Dolichomia (Dolichomia (=Herculia) olinalis) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of oaks.
Wingspan: 2/3 - 1 in. (1.6 - 2.4 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: The rose to deep purplish forewings are decorated by yellowish antemedial and postmedial lines, which widen and become triangular at the leading edges of the forewings. Wings are edged by a narrow band of yellow fringe.

Pink-fringed Dolichomia Moth

Pink-fringed Dolichomia Moth (Dolichomia binodulalis)

 

Meal Moth

 Meal Moth (Pyralis farinalis) 

Pink-masked Pyralid (Pyralis disciferalis)

Family Saturniidae

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Ceratomcampinae 

Rosy Maple Moth

Rosy Maple Moth (Dryocampa rubicunda) 

Primary food plants: The larvae of this moth, Green-striped Mapleworms, may be serious pests on maple and oak trees. Adults do not feed.
Wingspan: 1 5/16 - 2 1/16 in. (3.3 - 5.2 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Forewings are pink except for the middle section (amount of pink is highly variable). The body and other areas may be white, cream, or yellow in coloration.
 

Spiny Oakworm Moth (Anisota stigma) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on various oak species, and adults do not feed.
Wingspan: 1 9/16 - 2 3/4 in. (4.0 - 7.0 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: Female moths are larger than males. The upper side is reddish-orange (males are redder than females) with small, black flecks scattered throughout and faint postmedian lines on both wings. The forewings have small, white cell spots.

Pink-striped Oakworm Moth (Anisota virginiensis) - female

Imperial Moth (Eacles imperialis) 

 

Primary food plants: Caterpillars feed on conifers and deciduous trees and shrubs, including pines, oaks, maples, sweet gum, and sassafras. Adults do not feed.
Wingspan: 3 1/8 - 6 7/8 in. (7.9 - 17.5 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: The upper wing surface is yellow with pinkish-brown to purplish-brown patches, bands, and cell spots. Tiny, brown flecks are scattered over the surface of the wings. Females may be distinguished from males by their larger body size and smaller patches on the forewings. Right photo courtesy of Patricia Slice.

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Hemileucinae 

Io Moth

Io Moth (Automeris io)  

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on a variety of plants, including clover, corn, maples, elms, birches, oaks, and willows.
Wingspan: 2 - 3 1/5 in. (5.0 - 8.0 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: Males and females are sexually dimorphic. The forewings of males typically are orange, and those of females are brighter red. A distinguishing characteristic of this species is the black and blue "bull's-eye" with a white center located on the hindwing.
 

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Saturniinae 

Luna Moth (Actias luna)

Luna Moth (Actias luna) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on many trees, such as cherries, hickories, sweet gum, and willows. The image at left is courtesy of Mark Wiley. Adult luna moths do not feed.
Wingspan: 2 15/16 - 4 1/8 in. (7.5 - 10.5 cm)
Season: March - September
Description: Wing coloration is pale green with a transparent eyespot on each wing. Hindwings are drawn out into long, curving tails. 
 

Cecropia Silkmoth

Cecropia Silkmoth (Hyalophora cecropia) Primary food plants: Caterpillars feed on various shrubs and trees, including wild cherry, sugar maple, dogwood, and birch trees. Adults do not feed.
Wingspan: 4 1/3 - 5 9/10 in. (11.0 - 15.0 cm)
Season: March - July
Description: This moth is the largest North American moth. The body of the moth is red with a white "collar" and white bands on the abdomen. The wings are dark with whitish, hair-like scales, which gives a frosted appearance, and the forewings are red at the base. On each of the wings, the crescent spots and area outside of the postmedian line are reddish colored.
 

Polyphemus Moth (Antheraea polyphemus) Primary food plants: Larvae feed on various shrubs and trees, including oaks, pines, maples, hickories,grapes, ashes, birches, and members of the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 3 9/10 - 5 7/8 in. (10.0 - 15.0 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: The forewing coloration varies from brownish to reddish and is crossed by white antemedial lines and black postmedial lines edged with pink. An oval, transparent spot is located on each wing and is ringed with yellow, blue, and black. Notice that the rings around the spots on the hindwings are much larger than those located on the forewings.
 

Polyphemus Moth

Family Sphingidae

 

 

 

 

 

Subfamily Macroglossinae 

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx (Euorpha pandorus) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on ampelopsis, grapes, and Virginia creeper. Adult food is nectar from flowers, including petunias, bouncing bets, and white campions.
Wingspan: 3 1/4 - 4 1/2 in. (8.2 - 11.5 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: The upper surface is colored light brown with shades of green to olive green. The forewings have a dark-colored, square mark at the center of the inner margin. The underside varies in color from yellowish-green to light brown.

Tersa Sphinx (Xylophanes tersa) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on Manettia sp., smooth buttonplant, and starclusters. Adults feed on nectar from flowers such as honeysuckle.
Wingspan: 2 3/8 - 3 1/8 in. (6.0 - 7.9 cm)
Season: February - November; shorter season in the North
Description: The abdomen is long and pointed. Forewings are pale brown with light purple at the base and with darker brown lengthwise lines. Jagged black markings on hindwing contrast sharply with the yellowish-white middle area. The two images to the right courtesy of Kirk Wright.

 Tersa Sphinx
 Lettered Sphinx

Lettered Sphinx (Deidamia inscripta) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on Ampelopsis, grapes, and Virginia creeper.
Wingspan: 1 4/5 - 2 3/4 in. (4.5 - 7.0 cm)
Season: March - June
Description: Narrow, pale brown forewings have darker brown markings and deeply scalloped edges. A small black and white spot is located slightly below the wing tips. The orangish brown hindwings are bordered with dark brown and have a dark brown median line.

Nessus Sphinx (Amphion floridensis) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on Ampelopsis, grapes, and cayenne pepper. Adults feed on nectar from flowers.
Wingspan: 1 1/2 - 2 1/5 in. (3.7 - 5.5 cm)
Season: April to July
Description: This moth is easily identified by the two yellow bands that cross the dark brown abdomen.

Nessus Sphinx
 Snowberry Clearwing

Snowberry Clearwing (Hemaris diffinis) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on snowberry, honeysuckle, dogbane, and dwarf bush honeysuckle plants. Adults feed on nectar from flowers, including snowberry, lantana, dwarf bush honeysuckle, thistle, and lilac flowers.
Wingspan: 1 1/4 - 2 in. (3.2 - 5.1 cm)
Season: March - August
Description: Adults mimic bumblebees. The transparent wings are bordered with dark brown to light brownish-orange.

Virginia Creeper (Hog) Sphinx (Darasa myron) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of Ampelopsis, viburnums, and Virginia creeper.
Wingspan: 2 - 2 3/5 in. (5 - 6.5 cm)
Season: April - September
Description: Forewings are pale to dark brown, shaded with olive green. Darker brown markings on the forewings include the antemedial and postmedial bands, the reniform spot, and patches located at the wingtips and at the interior angle of the wings. A small brown to greenish patch is positioned at the anal angle of the orange hindwings.

Virginia Creeper Sphinx
 Azalea Sphinx

Azalea Sphinx (Darapsa choerilus=pholus) 

 

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of azaleas, viburnums, and blueberries.
Wingspan: 5.7 - 7.5 cm (2 1/4 ~3 in.)
Season: March - September
Description: This species may be distinguished from Darapsa myron (the Virginia Creeper, or Hog, Sphinx) by the reddish brown forewings with purplish shading (rather than green). In addition, the postmedial line of the azalea sphinx is straight, whereas that of the Virginia Creeper Sphinx is somewhat curved. Notice also the small brownish to greenish patch located at the inner edge of the orange hindwings.

Banded Sphinx (Eumorpha fasciata)

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of evening primroses.
Wingspan: 3 1/2 - 3 6/7 in. (8.7 - 9.6 cm)
Season: May - July
Description: A noticeable brownish band is located along the leading edges of the darkly-colored forewings. Other forewing markings include pale-colored bands and streaks. The outer edges of the forewings are bordered with pink coloration, and a pink patch is located at the anal angle of the hindwing, as well. The photo on the left was contributed by Erica Etter. Center photo courtesy of Betty and Jerry Brown. 

banded sphinx group
white lined sphinx group

White-lined Sphinx (Hyles lineata)

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on a variety of plants, including four-o'clocks, willow-herbs, and apple trees.
Wingspan: 2 1/2 - 3 3/5 in. (6.3 - 9.0 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: A pale-colored stripe crosses the dark olive-brown forewings and white-lined veins. The black hindwings are marked by a wide, pink band of coloration. Specimen pictured in photo at left courtesy of Jennifer Morphew. 

 

Subfamily Smerinthinae

 

 

white box4
small eyed sphinx

Small-eyed Sphinx (Paonias myops) 

 

 Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of willows, hawthorns, birches, poplars, and plants belonging to the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 1 4/5 - 3 in. (4.5 - 7.5 cm)
Season: May - September
Description: The dark brown forewings are doubly indented, and the hindwings are scalloped. 

Walnut Sphinx (Amorpha juglandis)

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of hickories, butternuts, walnuts, and plants belonging to the genus Prunus.
Wingspan: 1 4/5 - 3 in. (4.5 - 7.5 cm)
Season: May - August
Description: The forewings and hindwings of the walnut sphinx are both colored brown and vary in hue from light to dark. A pinkish to whitish tint may also be apparent. A noticeable characteristic of this moth is the scalloped to wavy edges on the outer margins of both sets of wings. 

Walnut sphinx

 Subfamily Sphinginae  

  

  

  

  

   

Pink-spotted Hawk Moth (Agrius cingulatus)

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of pawpaw, sweet potato, and jimsonweed.
Wingspan: 3 4/5 - 4 4/5 in. (9.5 - 12 cm)
Season: June - October
Description: Note the pink banding on the abdomen and the pink shading at the base of the gray hindwings. Hindwing markings also include black bands.
 

pink-spotted hawk moth
carolina sphinx

Carolina Sphinx (Manduca sexta)

Top photo courtesy of Cindy Thornton. Bottom photo contributed by Johnathan Fuell. 

Five-spotted Hawk Moth (Manduca quinquemaculata)

Primary food plants: Larvae (Tomato Hornworms) feed on the leaves of tomato, potato, and tobacco plants.
Wingspan: 3 3/5 - 5 2/5 in. (9.0 - 13.5 cm)
Season: May - October
Description: Black and white lines mark the gray background of the forewings. Distinct, black, toothed median lines separated by white cross the hindwings. Five pairs of yellow spots usually decorate the abdomen of this moth, although six pairs are occasionally present. Specimen pictured on top courtesy of John 

Fivespotted group
Rustic Sphinx

Rustic Sphinx Moth (Manduca rustica)
Images courtesy of Don Burnham. 

Plebeian Sphinx (Paratraea plebeja)

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of Trumpet-creeper, lilacs, and passionflowers.
Wingspan: 2 2/5 - 3 in. (6 - 7.5 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: A series of black dashes mark the gray forewings from base to apex, and a conspicuous, white reniform spot is located near the median area of the forewings. A vague, blackish band crosses the center of the hindwings, and another blackish band is located along the outer border. 

plebian group
waved sphinx

Waved Sphinx (Ceratomia undulosa)
 

Hagen's Sphinx (Ceratomia hageni)

Primary food plants:
Larvae feed on the leaves of Osage-Orange trees.
Wingspan: 8.0 - 9.2 cm
Season: April - September
Description: The pointed forewings of Hagen's Sphinx are gray with greenish shading. Distinctive characteristics include two light-colored patches, one of which is located at the tip of the forewings, and the other is located near the median. 

Top image courtesy of Kirk Wright.

hagen

Family Thyrididae

 

Subfamily Thyridinae  

Thyrididae

Mournful Thyris Moth (Pseudothyris (=Thyris) sepulchralis)  

Mournful Thyris Moth

Family Tortricidae


Subfamily Chlidanotinae 

No Common Name

No Common Name (Thaumatographa jonesi) 

  

Subfamily Olethreutinae
 

Scudder's Epiblema Moth (Epiblema scudderiana)

Scudder

 

Subfamily Tortricinae 

Three-streaked Sparganothis (Sparganothis tristriata) 

Three-streaked Sparganothis
Red-banded Leafroller

Red-banded Leafroller (Argyrotaenia velutinana) - female 

Red-banded Leafroller2

No Common Name (Amorbia humerosana)

Primary food plants: Larvae feed on the leaves of a wide variety of plants, including pines, poison ivy, sumac, alders, and apple trees.
Wingspan: 5/6 - 1 1/5 in. (2.1 - 3.0 cm)
Season: April - early July
Description: The forewings are mottled pale gray and are flecked with black. Generally, a darker gray, somewhat triangular area (the pattern is not sharp) extends inward from the leading edge of the forewing. The hindwings are gray. 

Amorbia humerosana
Oblique-banded Leafroller

Oblique-banded Leafroller (Choristoneura rosaceana)

Primary food plants: Larvae (Oblique-banded Leafrollers) feed on the leaves of a variety of woody plants, including apple trees, roses, oaks, holly, and pine trees.
Wingspan: 5/6 - 1 1/5 in. (2.1 - 3.0 cm)
Season: April - October
Description: The forewings are reddish-brown with two dark brown patches on each wing. 

Yponomeutidae


Subfamily Attevinae
 

Ailanthus Webworm Moth (Atteva punctella)



Primary food plants: Larvae feed on leaves of Ailanthus (Tree-of-heaven) and paradise trees. Adults feed on the nectar of goldenrods.
Wingspan: 7/10 - 1 1/5 in. (1.8 - 3.0 cm)
Season: March - November
Description: This common moth has orange forewings with four bands of yellow spots outlined in black. The caterpillars of this moth (Ailanthus Webworms) live in communal webs. 

Ailanthus
 
 
 
 
Weather Icon
Javascript must be enabled to view the current weather conditions