Transitional Fungi

Those fungi that appear in late summer, but disappear before the fall arrives with its cooler temperatures, are known as transitional fungi. Such mushrooms and other fungi usually appear in late August into September, depending on the availability of rain and the temperature of the soil. Examples of this group include the showy canary-yellow bolete (Boletus curtisii), pink bottoms (Agaricus campestris and allies), and the parasol mushroom, (Macrolepiota procera), as well as large-sized (caps up to 20 centimeters in diameter; stems approaching 180 centimeters in length) specimens belonging to the genus Amanita such as A. polypyramis, A. daucipes, and A. ravenelii. Also, Meripilus sumstenei, the cauliflower mushroom, (Sparassis spathulata = S. herbstii) and large bouquets of the ringless honey mushroom (Armillaria tabescens) often can be found growing on stumps of cut hardwood trees, or at the base of old dead hardwood trees, during this time.  

Boletus curtisii
Photo: David Lewis 

Boletus curtisii
Agaricus sp.

Agaricus sp. 

Amanita sp. 

Amanita sp.
Meripilus sumstenei

Meripilus sumstenei

Armillaria tabescens

Armillaria tabescens
The Cauliflower Mushroom

The Cauliflower Mushroom (Sparassis spathulata = S. herbstii)  

 
 
 
 
Weather Icon
Javascript must be enabled to view the current weather conditions