Writing a Bibliography

It a good idea to begin a working bibliography when you start searching for sources. Keep a detailed running record of each item you consult, even if you don't check every book out of the library or make a hard copy of each article, you might discover later that you would like to look an item again. Go to Purdue's Style Guides to see examples for four main bibliographic citation styles.

For books, write down the following information:  

  1. Author's full name (last name first)
  2. Full title (include subtitles)
  3. Edition (if the book is not a 1st edition)
  4. Volume number (and total number of volumes in set)
  5. City of publication 
  6. Publisher's name
  7. Year of publication 
  8. Call number (or other access point)

 

For articles found in scholarly journals:  

  1. Author's full name (last name first) 
  2. Title of article 
  3. Title of journal 
  4. Volume and issue numbers 
  5. Date of publication 
  6. Inclusive page numbers of article (ex: 23-34) 
  7. Call number (or other access point)

 

For newspaper or magazine articles:  

  1. Author's full name (last name first) 
  2. Title of article 
  3. Title of periodical 
  4. Volume and issue numbers 
  5. Date of publication 
  6. Inclusive page numbers of article (ex: 32-43) 
  7. Call number (or other access point) 
  8. In your notes, include any information you would need to relocate this item

 

For Internet sources:  

  1. Author's full name (last name first) 
  2. Title of document 
  3. Title of site (project name, database, periodical, or personal or profesional site) 
  4. Name of editor of site, project, database, etc.) 
  5. Date of publication (or last update) 
  6. Name of sponsoring institution or organization associated with the site 
  7. Date you accessed the site 
  8. Network address or URL 
  9. In your notes, include any information you would need to relocate this item  


 
 
 
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profiles

“At HSU my schedule in any given semester was likely to include chemistry and philosophy, or biology and history, or physics and literature. That juxtaposition of ideas helped me understand things in ways that I probably wouldn’t have otherwise. A physicist who has learned how to think like a historian, or like a biologist, or like a philosopher is much better equipped to solve a wide variety of complex problems than someone who has mastered some quantity of technical information.”
 

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Dr. Anthony P. LyonsBachelor of Science - Physics, 1988
 
 
 
 
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