Sociology, Human Services and Criminal Justice

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Faculty: Dr. Joyce Shepherd, Chair; Dr. Rigsby, Dr. Trubitt, Dr. Vetter, Ivan Birch, Shari Valentine, Dr. Hansen

The Department of Sociology, Human Services and Criminal Justice offers a broad range of curriculum designed to prepare students for career employment, graduate school and professionals in professions of human service, and human and social justice.  The department offers a range of Baccalaureate degrees as well as several minors and a growing number of certificates that will enhance the educational experience.  Opportunities exist for practicum work and independent study as well.  Our faculty are dedicated to scholarly excellence and the success of our students.  We encourage students to think, analyze, create, understand, and discover society, social issues, diversity, change and to develop a respect for all knowledge and all living things.

Sociology  

We offer a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology as well as a minor.  Sociology is the systematic study of the social behavior of  individuals  as  well as the working of social groups, organizations, cultures and societies. Study in sociology provides a scientific perspective for studying the effects of cultural and social forces on individuals, groups, and institutions. Students who major in sociology are given the opportunity to study in the field of family and gender relations, gerontology, crime and delinquency, as well as sociological theory, research methodology, and statistics. Graduates are prepared for positions in industry, government, private and public agencies, and in education and research organizations. Sociology is an especially appropriate major or minor for students entering any of the helping professions. For those who wish to become professional sociologists, an excellent preparation for graduate school is available.

Human Services

We offer a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Services as well as a minor.  Students selecting the Human Services major typically desire positions in institutions, private and public, which provide direct services to diverse groups in our society.  Graduates are prepared for positions in industry, government, private and public agencies, and in education and research organizations. They will be confronting the human consequences of problems such as crime, poverty, alcoholism, child abuse, and discrimination. The curriculum includes required and elective courses, advising, and a supervised field experience in one or more human service agencies. Graduates will also have the choice of pursuing advanced study in fields such as social work, administration, counseling, psychology, and sociology.

Criminal Justice

We offer a Bachelor of Arts (with two options of study), and a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice.  In addition we offer a minor in criminal justice, a certificate in criminal justice and a certificate in forensic science.  The Criminal Justice profession seeks to encompass the preservation and protection of social order in a free society.  It includes principles such as democracy, law, civil liberties, and procedural processes safeguarding citizens against intimidation, oppression and crime.  The curriculum is based upon the University’s liberal arts core and is designed to prepare students for higher education and entering careers in criminal justice. We focus upon helping students achieve: knowledge and reasoning, the integration of ability and skills, professional conduct and ethics, and a vision for the future of the profession that can adapt as society does. 

In addition the department of Sociology, Human Services, and Criminal Justice offers certificates in gerontology and minors in the fields of anthropology, gerontology and human diversity.

The Department of Sociology, Human Services, and Criminal Justice and the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences jointly administer an interdisciplinary minor in child and family dynamics.  Contact persons for this program are Dr. Joyce Shepherd, chair of sociology, human services, and criminal justice (shepherj@hsu.edu).

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology

     SOC     1013                 Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)

     SOC     2023                 Social Problems (3 hours)

     SOC     3103                 Statistics (3 hours)

     SOC     3113                 Contemporary Theory (3 hours)

     SOC     4213                 Research Methods (3 hours)

     SOC     4323                 Senior Thesis (3 hours)                                        

Directed Sociology Electives

Choose 18 hours of sociology coursework.

Foreign Language

Choose two courses (6 hours) from the selection below:

_____ SPA, GER, FRE 2033

_____ SPA, GER, FRE 2043                                                                                        

Minor Required

Students earning a B.A. in Sociology are required to also earn a minor (12 to 18 credit hours) from another academic area.                      

Bachelor of Science Degree in Human Services 

     HS        2013                 Introduction to Human Services (3 hours)

     HS        3023                 Social Welfare Policy and Institutions (3 hours)

     HS        3033                 Methods I (3 hours)

     HS        4043                 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (3 hours)

     HS        4052                 Methods II (2 hours)

     HS        4081                 Practice Seminar (1 hour)

     HS        4066, 4076     Field Experience (12 hours)

Other Required Courses

     SOC     2193                 Racial and Cultural Minorities (3 hours)

     SOC     2023                 Social Problems (3 hours)

     SOC     3103                 Statistics (3 hours)

     SOC     4213                 Research Methods (3 hours)

     SOC     4223                 Childhood Socialization or

     PSY     2263                 Developmental Psychology (3 hours)

     PSY     1013                 General Psychology (3 hours)

Under advisement, students must select 18 hours of directed electives from the following programs:  Sociology, Psychology, and Family and Consumer Sciences.

Human Services Research Tools Clusters

Digital and Research Cluster

Choose six hours of coursework from the following selections: 

     CSC     2003                 Intro to Computers (3 hours)

     CSC     2163                 Microsoft Excel (3 hours)

     CSC     2301                 Introduction to HTML (1 hour)

     CSC     2312                 Advanced HTML (2 hours)

     BTE     2133                 Word Processing I (3 hours)

     BIS       2073                 Foundations of Information Systems (3 hours)

     ART     1793                 Digital Skills for Artists (3 hours)

     LIB      3003                  Library Research Methods (3 hours)

Critical Though & Communication Cluster

Choose one course (3 hours) from the selection below:

     COM   2513                 Leadership and Group Communication (3 hours)

     COM   3273                 Organizational Communication (3 hours)

     COM   3413                 Female/Male Communication (3 hours)

     COM   3533                 Interpersonal Communication (3 hours)

     COM   3813                 Business and Professional Communication (3 hours)

     ENG    2133                 Rhetoric and Argument (3 hours)

     PHI      2133                 Logic and Argument (3 hours)

     PSY     3233                 Critical and Analytical Thinking (3 hours)

     PSY     4343                 Advanced Statistics (3 hours)

Minor in Human Services

Students wanting to minor in Human Services should take 12 hours selected from the following:

     HS       2013                 Introduction to Human Services (3 hours)

     HS       3023                 Social Welfare and Institutions (3 hours)

     HS       3033                 Methods I (3 hours)

     HS       4043                 Human Behavior in the Social Environment (3 hours)

     HS       4183                 Death and Dying (3 hours)

     HS       4443                 Human Services for the Aged (3 hours)

Minor in Anthropology

The department offers a minor in Anthropology which provides students with an opportunity to examine the discipline as a possible area of graduate study and as a complement to a Certificate in Forensics.  In addition, exposure to field experience in archeology is possible. Requirements are 12 hours made up of two introductory courses and two upper level courses devoted to topics in Anthropology and/or Archeology.

    ANT     2013                 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 hours)

    ANT     2023                 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archeology (3 hours)

    ANT     3043                 North American Indians (3 hours)

    ANT     3053                 World Cultures (3 hours)

    ANT     3096                 Archeology Field School (6 hours)

    ANT     4083                 Readings and Research in Anthropology (3 hours) 

A minor for the Bachelor of Arts degree requires at least 12 semester hours, at least three of which must be at the Senior College level.  

Minor in Sociology

    SOC 1013                     Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)

    SOC 2023                     Social Problems (3 hours)

                                          Sociology Electives (9 hours)

                                          Total (15 hours)

Criminal Justice

The mission of the Criminal Justice Program at Henderson State University is to advance theory, practice, and cause of criminal justice through scholarship, teaching, training, and technical assistance in responding to the needs of students, criminal justice professionals, and society.  The criminal justice programs are administered through the Department of Sociology and Human Services, Ellis College of Arts and Sciences.  The Department offers a minor in Criminal Justice and a major, Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice.  Each program is embedded in a liberal arts education.  

Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice 

The academic program for the criminal justice major requires 120 credit hours.  The Department’s goal for the criminal justice major program is being committed to high quality instruction. 

The major program consists of two options.  Option I follows an academic classroom model, preparing the student for either entry to employment, or for advanced graduate or professional studies.  This option requires a 15 hour class component with a required writing intensive capstone in which the student will exemplify the knowledge of and application of theory, conceptualization, research methods, operationalization, observations, and data processing and analysis in a directed project followed by an oral presentation.  Option II provides the student with an alternative service learning experience that includes a 15 hour field practicum enhancing employability.  This option prepares the student for entry level criminal justice jobs. 

  • Option I is designed to provide those students wishing to pursue a graduate or other professional degree with a firm foundation in research design, statistics, and sociological and criminological theory. 
  • Option II is designed to provide those wishing to directly enter a criminal justice career with the professional skills to analyze criminal justice and criminological issues through academic and applied settings. 

Major Required Courses (21 Hours)

    CRJ              2013         Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (3 hours)

    CRJ              2123         Introduction to Criminology

    SOC/CRJ     3103         Statistics (3 hours)

    SOC/CRJ     3133         Juvenile Delinquency & Offenses (3 hours)

    CRJ              3513         Due Process & Criminal Procedure (3 hours)

    CRJ              4093         Criminological Theory & Behavior (3 hours)

    SOC/CRJ     4213         Research Methods (3 hours)

Degree Program Options I & II    

Students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice may choose between two options.  In addition to completing all other requirements for the degree, students may choose either Option I or Option II.  Option I requires completion of 15 hours of traditional classroom curriculum as follows: 6 hours of course work from the approved Criminal Justice Electives, 6 hours of course work from the approved Directed Electives, and the 3 hour required Senior Thesis Capstone.  Option II requires completion of the 15 hour Practicum Block including HS4052 Methods II and HS4081 Practice Seminar, and CRJ4066 and 4076.  Students are encouraged to take CRJ3033 Methods I in the fall preceding their field experience.

OPTION I: Classroom Based and Required Capstone (15 Hours) 

SOC/CRJ 4323        (WI) Senior Thesis (3 hours)

Option I CRJ Electives (6 hours)                                                                      

CRJ 2023              Criminal Evidence (3 hours)

CRJ 2043              Survey Corrections (3 hours)

CRJ 2053              Police Community Relations (3 hours)

CRJ 3343              Deviant Behavior (3 hours)

CRJ 4023              Criminal Law & Criminal Responsibility (3 hours)

CRJ 3033              Methods I

SOC/CRJ 4043     Special Topics (3 hours)

SOC/CRJ 4503     Domestic Violence (3 hours)            

Option I Directed Electives (6 hours)

SOC      2023          Social Problems (3 hours)

SOC      2193          Racial and Cultural Minorities (3 hours)

PSC      4053          American Constitutional Development (3 hours)

CRJ      4403          (WI) Social Movement and Change (3 hours)

PSC      3213          Judicial Process (3 hours)

PSC      4063          Public Administration (3 hours)

PSC      4173          Civil Liberties (3 hours)

PSY      3333          Forensic Psychology (3 hours)

HS        2013          Introduction to Human Services (3 hours)

HS        4043          Human Behavior and the Social Environment (3 hours) 

ANT      4043          Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3 hours)

OPTION II: Practicum Block (15 Hours)

THE REQUIRED PRACTICUM “BLOCK” BELOW CAN ONLY BE TAKEN AFTER COMPLETING ALL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS & ELECTIVE COURSES!

          HS         4052           Methods II (2 hours)

          HS         4081           Practice Seminar (1 hour)

          HS/CRJ    4066/4076      Field Experience (12 hours)

Foreign Language (6-12 hours)*

____SPA, GER, FRE 2033

____SPA, GER, FRE 2043

* Credit in two or more languages will not satisfy the requirement.  Students must successfully complete six hours in intermediate level or above of a principal modern foreign language.  The Foreign Language Department may require prerequisites before enrolling in intermediate or higher level courses.  Students may select these courses in satisfaction of electives. 

Electives

Select 6 - 12 hours of criminal justice coursework. 

Minor

Students earning a B.A. in Criminal Justice are required to earn a minor (12 - 18 credit hours) from another academic area. 

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

Major Required Courses (24 hours)

         CRJ        2013          Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (3 hours)

         CRJ        2123          Introduction to Criminology (3 hours)

         CRJ        3133          Juvenile Delinquency *Offenses (3 hours)

         CRJ        3513          Due Process & Criminal Procedure (3 hours)

         CRJ        4023          Criminal Law & Responsibility (3 hours)

         CRJ        4213          Research Methods (3 hours)

         CRJ        3253          Criminal Forensic Science (3 hours)

Electives (6 hours)

         CRJ        4323          (WI) Senior Thesis (3 hours)

         CRJ        2023          Criminal Evidence (3 hours)

         CRJ        4403          (WI) Social Movements & Change (3 hours)

         CRJ        3343          Deviant Behavior (3 hours)

         CRJ        4043          Special Topics (3 hours)

         CRJ        4503          Domestic Violence (3 hours)

         CRJ        3333          Forensic Psychology (3 hours)

Science & Match (36 hours)

Required Science Courses (11 hours)

         CHM       1234          Introduction to Forensic Science & Lab (4 hours)

         ANT        2023          Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archeology (3 hours)

         CHM       1044          General Organic and Biochemistry (4 hours) 

Science & Math Electives (15 hours)

Twelve hours of mathematics intensive coursework, of this 12 hours (MTH 1234) College Algebra is required, (CRJ 3103) Statistics is a required substitute for three hours of advanced mathematics. An additional six hours may included any combination of courses offered by Chemistry, Biology or Physics. 

Minor

Students earning a B.S. in Criminal Justice must earn a minor (12 - 18 hours) from another academic area, which will include at least one 3000-4000 level course; refer to Minor Department's specific requirements. 

Upper Level Directed Electives (as required)

Minor in Criminal Justice 

The minor in criminal justice requires completion of 18 credit hours consisting of a nine hour core and nine hours of directed electives.

Criminal justice students in the minor program will gain insight and knowledge in theory, and major substantive areas in the field.  The minor is designed for students wishing to complement their major field of study and/or enhance their entry into employment.

Core Required Courses (9 hours)

         CRJ        2013           Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (3 hours)

         CRJ        3133           Juvenile Delinquency and Offenses (3 hours)

         CRJ        4093           Criminology Theory and Behavior (3 hours)

Directive Electives (9 hours to be selected from the following)

         SOC      2023           Social Problems (3 hours)

         SOC      2193           Racial and Cultural Minorities (3 hours)

         CRJ      4403           (WI) Social Movements and Change (3 hours)

         CRJ      4023           Criminal Law and Criminal Responsibility (3 hours)

         CRJ      3513           Due Process and Criminal Procedure (3 hours)

         CRJ      3343           Deviant Behavior (3 hours)

         CRJ      4503           Domestic Violence (3 hours)

Criminal Justice minor students should take American National Government as one of their general education social science requirements. Students should have this course before taking core courses or Criminal Procedure.          

Certificate in Criminal Justice 

The Criminal Justice Certificate enhances career opportunities in law enforcement, the courts and corrections. This certificate may be coupled with your major and minor to provide you with additional education that can lead to greater responsibility, career advancement and income growth. The requirements for the 12 Hour program are:

Core Required Courses (9 hours)
CRJ 2013                                          Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (3 hours)
CRJ 3513 Due Process and Criminal Procedure (3 hours)
CRJ 4023 Criminal Law and Criminal Responsibility (3 hours)
Electives (3 hours)                                                           
CRJ 2033                                      Introduction to Criminology      (3 hours)
CRJ 2023 Criminal Evidence (3 hours)
CRJ 2043 Survey of Corrections (3 hours)
CRJ 2053 Police-Community Relations (3 hours)

Certificate in Forensics

The Certificate in Forensics enhances career opportunities in law enforcement, the courts and corrections, psychology, chemistry and computer sciences. This certificate may be coupled with your major and minor to provide you with additional education that can lead to greater responsibility, career advancement and income growth.

Core Required Courses (10 hours)
CRJ 2023 Criminal Evidence* (3 hours)
PSY 3333 Forensic Psychology (3 hours)
CHM 1234 Introduction to Forensic Science & Lab (4 hours)
Directed Electives (3 hours) 
CRJ 3513 Due Process and Criminal Procedure (3 hours)
CRJ 2023 Introduction to Criminology (3 hours)
ANT 2023 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archeology (3 hours)
Total (13 hours)

*CRJ 3253 Criminal Forensic Science may substitute for CRJ 2023. 

Certificate and Minor Program in Gerontology

The Certificate and Minor Program in Gerontology will enable students to earn extra qualifications while they are working toward their B.A. degree in Human Services or Sociology, as well as enhance their job marketability.  This program would also benefit currently employed caregivers in the field of aging and those interested in learning more about the elderly.  Student should see gerontology advisor, Dr. Joyce Shepherd (email:shepherj@hsu.edu)

Minor in Gerontology Required Courses (15 hours)

     SOC     4483                 Medical Sociology (3 hours)

     SOC     4383                 Social Gerontology (3 hours)

     SOC     4183                 Death and Dying (3 hours)

     SOC     4443                 Human Services for the Aged (3 hours)

     SOC     3273                 Community Service or HS 3033 Methods I (3 hours)                                            

Total (15 hours)    

Certificate in Gerontology (12 hours)

     SOC     4383                 Social Gerontology (3 hours)

     SOC     4443/HS 4443  Human Services for the Aged (3 hours)

     SOC     3273                 Community Services OR HS 3033 Methods I (3 hours)  

Three Hours Electives (selected from the following)

     SOC 4183/HS 4183      Issues in Death and Dying (3 hours)

     SOC 4483                     Medical Sociology (3 hours)

     SOC 4503                     Domestic Violence (3 hours)

Human Diversity Minor

The undergraduate minor in human diversity provides students with a broad intellectual framework for understanding common human experience and differences.  Courses fulfilling this requirement foster respect for the diversity of people and cultures within the bond of humankind.  This minor examines differences and similarities in individual human behavior as related to issues such as race, ethnicity, gender, gender roles, creed, religion, culture, age, body type, physical conditions, sexual orientation, learning differences, social skills differences, intelligence level, regional differences, language, dialect, socioeconomic status, and other areas of individual and group differences.

The minor is jointly administered by the departments of Psychology and Sociology.  Students are required to take 18 hours of coursework including Human Diversity (PSY 2373); Racial and Cultural Minorities (SOC 2193); Social Psychology (either SOC 3143 or PSY 3063 — although we normally stress the deep differences between these two classes, for purposes of this minor either provides a useful foundation for considering interactions with diverse people); and nine hours of electives.

Core Required Courses

     PSY      2373                 Human Diversity (3 hours)

     SOC     2193                 Racial and Cultural Minorities (3 hours)

     PSY     3063                  Social Psychology or

     SOC     3143                 Social Psychology (3 hours)

                                           Diversity Electives (9 hours)*

*Nine hours of electives from the following, including at least three hours from Group A:

Group A:  Broader Diversity Issues

     ANT4053/SOC4063    World Cultures

     COM   3413                 Female/Male Communication

     EDU    4493                 Global Studies

     GEO    2163                 World Geography

     PHI      3023                 Religions of the World

     PSY     2023                 Abnormal Psychology

     PSY     3043                 Cross-Cultural Psychology

     SOC     4263                 Stratification and Poverty

     SOC     4293                 Sociology of Gender Roles

     SOC     4383                 Social Gerontology

Group B:  Specialized Diversity Issues

      ENG    4483                 Acquisition of English as a Second Language

      FRE     3223                 French Culture and Civilization

      GEO    3153                 Geography of Latin America

      GER    3223                 German Culture and Civilization

       HIS      4333                 American Women's History

       PSY     2263                 Developmental Psychology

       PSY     3113                 Personality

       SOC/HS 4443              Human Services for the Aged

       SPA     3623                 Civilization and Culture of Latin America

       SPE     3013                Psychology of the Exceptional Child

                                             or any non-Western Culture course not in Group A

Classes used to meet the requirements of this minor may not also count toward major requirements.  To promote exposure to a variety of perspectives on diversity issues, no more than nine of the 18 hours may come from a single discipline.  Psychology and sociology students may not use classes from their respective majors to count toward the electives for this minor.  Because studies in human diversity should include interaction with one's fellow human beings, no coursework completed by distance learning (correspondence or Internet) may count toward this minor.

Courses in Criminal Justice

CRJ 2013.  Introduction to the Criminal Justice System.  An introductory course designed to familiarize students with the criminal justice system, the sub-systems and how they interrelate, the legal and ethical foundations of the system, the process offenders, punishment and alternatives, and the future of the criminal justice system.   Prerequisites: SOC 1013 Introduction to Sociology, or HS 2013 Introduction to Human Services, or consent of the instructor.  Fall, Spring.

CRJ 2113.  Criminal Evidence.  An analysis of the legal problems associated with the investigation of crime; the acquisition, preservation and presentation of evidence; principles of proof in criminal proceedings. Prerequisites: CRJ 2013 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System. On demand.

CRJ 2123.  Introduction to Criminology. An introductory course designed to familiarize students with study of crime and criminal behavior; nature and extent of crime; past and present theories from an interdisciplinary approach; evaluation of prevention, control and treatment programs. Prerequisites: SOC 1013 Introduction to Sociology. Fall, Spring, Summer.

CRJ 2143.  Survey of Corrections. Explores the operation of the correctional system within the context of society and within the criminal justice system, its historical foundations , the integration of criminology, the relationship the correctional system has to society, its interaction with the other components within the criminal justice system, corrections practices and issues and perspectives related to the incarcerated and justice. Prerequisites: CRJ 2013 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System. On demand.

CRJ 2153.  Police—Community Relations This course examines the role of the police in community crime prevention efforts, citizen participation and involvement in crime prevention and deterrence. An examination of existing programs, problems, and potential for police and community linked models for crime prevention and control. Prerequisites: CRJ 2013 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System. On demand.

CRJ 3033.  Methods I.  Introduction to basic objectives, skills, tasks, and activities essential to generic human and social services, and criminal justice professions.  Educationally directed field instruction is introduced via field experience in selected human services agencies and criminal justice agencies.  This course is cross-referenced with HS 3033.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 3033 and Human Services majors should enroll in HS 3033.    Prerequisites: HS 2013 or CRJ 2013.  Fall.

CRJ 3103.  Statistics.  A basic course in descriptive and inferential statistics.  General education math requirements must be met before taking this course.  This course is cross-referenced with HS 3033.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 3103 and Human Services and Sociology majors should enroll in SOC 3103.   Fall, Spring, Summer.

CRJ 3133.  Juvenile Delinquency and Offenses.  This course will apply sociological analysis to the social problem of juvenile delinquency. Theory, cause, control, and prevention will be the major themes of the course.  This course is cross-referenced with SOC 3133.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 3133 and Sociology majors should enroll in SOC 3133.   Prerequisites: SOC 1013 and CRJ 2013, or instructor's permission.  Spring.

CRJ 3253.  Criminal Forensic Science. This course provides an introductory survey course in forensic science, the application of science, and the scientific method to the law.  It will cover an array of forensic procedures, including ballistics, GC/MS analysis, chemical latent fingerprint procedures, crime scene investigation, DNA collection and analysis, entomology, forensic pathology, explosives, toxicology, and more.  This course also examines the scientific contributions of chemistry, biology, and physics to the criminal investigation process.    Course pre-requisites: CRJ 2013 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System and CRJ2123 Introduction to Criminology.

CRJ 3343.  Deviant Behavior.  Analysis of the extent, distribution and character of deviance with particular emphasis on the sociological explanations of underlying factors.  This course is cross-referenced with SOC 3343.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 3343 and Sociology majors should enroll in SOC 3343.    Prerequisites: SOC 1013 and CRJ 2013.  Fall, Spring.

CRJ 3513.  Due Process and Criminal Procedure.  This course is designed to explore and evaluate the requirements of the American system of criminal procedure, especially regarding the legal requirements of search and seizure, interrogation, right to counsel, identification, remedies for Constitutional violations and professional misconduct, court proceedings before and during trial, and conviction and post- conviction.  Prerequisites: Nine hours of criminal justice or instructor approval.  Fall.

CRJ 4023.  Criminal Law and Criminal Responsibility.  An analysis of criminal acts and principles of criminal responsibility, the elements of specific crimes, punishments, and defenses and mitigating circumstances permitted in the United States legal system.  Prerequisites: CRJ 2013 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System or consent of the instructor.  Fall, Spring.

CRJ 4043.  Special Topics.  This elective is designed for faculty to teach special courses in their areas of expertise, to offer courses for particular interest to students, and to address contemporary issues in the study of sociology, criminal justice, and human services.  The topics will vary each time the course is taught, and will be announced when the course is offered.  Senior level special topics may include Sociology of Religion, Corrections, Victimization, The Aging Criminal Population and Social Issues, Cultural Study Trips.  The course may be repeated when a different topic is taught.  Maximum of 6 hours will count toward the degree.  Prerequisites: Senior or above standing.  On demand.

CRJ 4066, 4076.  Field Experience.  Educationally directed field experience, with block placements in selected social welfare agencies for HS students and criminal justice agencies for criminal justice students, incorporating field instruction by qualified practitioners and professionals.  Limited to the human services major and criminal justice major.  This course is cross-referenced with HS 4066, 4075.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 4066, 4076 and Human Services majors should enroll in HS 4066, 4076.    Prerequisites: 12 hours of Human Services courses, or 12 hours of Criminal Justice courses.  Fall, Spring.

CRJ 4093.  (WI) Criminological Theory and Behavior.  This is a writing intensive course.  An advanced examination of original and annotated works of criminological theory primarily from sociological frameworks.  Theories of causation, prevention, control, and treatment are examined. Prerequisites: SOC 1013 Introduction to Sociology or CRJ 2033 Introduction to Criminology.  Fall, Spring.

CRJ 4403, 5403. (WI) Social Movements and Change. This is a writing intensive course.  An examination of the nature of social movements particularly in light of the nature of protest and potential for violence.  Activism is constantly going on in our world.  Globalization as well as advancing communication technologies have played a role in worldwide participation in social movements.  This study will examine a variety of local, national and international movements.  It examines the characteristics of social movement and protest as forms of collective action, major social trends in terms of dynamic effect on society, and centers on theoretical frameworks for understanding the causes, types, and life cycle of social movements.  This course is cross-referenced with SOC 3163.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 3163 and Sociology majors should enroll in SOC 3163. Prerequisites:  9 hours of sociology or criminal justice or a combination of sociology and criminal justice.  Fall, and on demand.

CRJ 4213.  (WI) Research Methods.  The principal techniques of sociological analysis with emphasis on measurement and design.  This course is cross-referenced with SOC 4213.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 4213 and Human Services and Sociology majors should enroll in SOC 4213.  Fall, Spring.

CRJ 4323.  (WI) Senior Thesis.  A capstone course for all seniors majoring in sociology involving the realization of the sociological imagination exemplifying the process of theory, conceptualization, research methods, operationalization, observations, data processing, and analysis in a directed project. Students will make an oral presentation of their project results through a departmentally approved review process or an approved undergraduate symposium.  This course is cross-referenced with SOC 4323.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 4323 and Human Services and Sociology majors should enroll in SOC 4323 Prerequisites: SOC/CRJ 3103, SOC/CRJ 4213, and SOC 3113 or CRJ 4093.  Fall, Spring.

CRJ 4503.  Domestic Violence.  This course will treat theories of physical and psychological violence and aggression as they apply to the interpersonal relationships within the home. Rape, child abuse, spouse battering, sibling abuse and elder abuse are focal topics.  This course is cross-referenced with SOC 4503.  CJ majors should enroll in CRJ 4503 and Human Services and Sociology majors should enroll in Sociology 4503. Summer.

Courses in Sociology

SOC 4143.  Special Topics. This elective is designed for faculty to teach special courses in their areas of expertise, to offer courses for particular interest to students, and to address contemporary issues in the study of sociology, criminal justice, and human services.  The topics will vary each time the course is taught, and will be announced when the course is offered.  Senior level special topics may include Sociology of Religion, Corrections, Victimization, The Aging Criminal Population and Social Issues, Cultural Study Trips.  The course may be repeated when a different topic is taught.  Maximum of 6 hours will count toward the degree.  Prerequisites: Senior or above standing.  On demand.

SOC 1013 (SOCI1013). Introduction to Sociology.  A basic course in sociology.  Fall, Spring, Summer.

SOC 2023 (SOCI2013). Social Problems. The nature, cause, and treatment of selected current social problems with emphasis on the student's development of critical analysis skills.  Fall, Spring.

SOC 2051-6. Criminal Justice Training.  A course designed to give credit to students for professional training in other than a formal academic class.  The credit is based on a formula of 60 clock hours of training being equal to one hour of academic credit and courses must be accredited by the Commission of Law Enforcement Standards and Training or an equivalent licensure body in another state.  On demand.

SOC 2193. Racial and Cultural Minorities.  A study of the interaction of ethnic and cultural groups in America; process leading to group prejudices, conflicts, and accommodations. Consideration will be given to racism, sexism, and ageism.  Fall.

SOC 3033. Marriage and Family. A functional course which will acquaint the student with research findings of sociology, psychology, and home economics, and which relate to the institution of the family and the practice of courtship and marriage. Behaviors and values will be explored using the technique of cross‑cultural comparisons.  Fall, Spring.

SOC 3043. Sociology of Education. Studies of social processes and interaction patterns of the school to the community, to other social institutions, and to social change.  Spring.

SOC 4063, 5063. World Cultures. A worldwide survey of traditional non-Western cultures, from small scale foragers and farmers to socially complex non-Europeans of the recent past and present.  We will look comparatively at ways that different people solve universal human problems, examine closely a sample of cultures to consider the interconnections among social, ideological and material aspects of life and consider relationships between Western and non-Western cultures on issues of worldwide concern like ecological change, warfare, and industrialization.  Meets the non-Western cultural requirement.  Fall, Spring.

SOC 3073. Complex Organization.  An examination of the relationship between labor and management in differing organizational structures and under differing management philosophies. Prerequisite: SOC 1013, or consent of the instructor.  On demand.

SOC 3103. Statistics. A basic course in descriptive and inferential statistics. General education math requirements must be met before taking this course.  Fall, Spring, Summer.

SOC 3113. (WI) Contemporary Theory. The development and convergence of modern sociological theories. Prerequisite: six hours of sociology.  Spring.

SOC 3133. Juvenile Delinquency. This course will apply sociological analysis to the social problem of juvenile delinquency. Theory, cause, control and prevention will be the major themes of the course. Prerequisite: SOC 1013 or instructor's permission.  Spring.

SOC 3143. Social Psychology.  A survey of the major theoretical perspectives and research   areas in the field.   Emphasis is placed upon the traditional perspectives in sociology: symbolic interactionism, including therein dramaturgy, ethnomethodology, and phenomenology. A clear distinction is made between a sociological and a psychological perspective.  Every other Spring.

SOC 3163. Collective Behavior. The emergence and nature of the collectivity and its culture and functions in terms of social organizations, value orientations, conventializations, and effectiveness in social change and social stability.  On demand.

SOC 3243. Demography.  A study of the characteristics, problems, and issues relating to the population of the United States and the world. Attention is given to birth and death rates, expectation and span of life, migration, and levels of living. Prerequisite: SOC 1013 and six additional hours of sociology, geography, and economics.  On demand.

SOC 3253. Group Dynamics. An analysis of small group structure and function with emphasis on leadership, membership, attitude and value formation, and role theory. Prerequisite: SOC 1013 or consent of the instructor.  On demand.

SOC 3273. Community Service. Designed to provide concerned students an opportunity to make relevant contributions to the community through service in an organization, agency, or program in the forefront of combatting social and environmental problems. Students will spend from eight to 10 hours each week in supervised community service. On demand.

SOC 3343. Deviant Behavior. Analysis of the extent, distribution and character of deviance with particular emphasis on the sociological explanations of underlying factors. Prerequisite: SOC 1013.  Fall, Spring.

SOC 3473. Sociology of the Community. Community life, its problems, institutions, groups, personalities, social structure and organization. An inquiry into various issues of existing research, pertinent theory and community planning for rural areas.  On demand.

SOC 3513 Due Process and Criminal Procedure. This course is designed to explore and evaluate the requirements of the American system of criminal procedure, especially regarding the legal requirements of search and seizure, interrogation, right to counsel, identification, remedies for Constitutional violations and professional misconduct, court proceedings before and during trial, and conviction and post-conviction. Prerequisite: Nine hours of sociology, or instructor approval.  Fall.

SOC 4093. Criminological Theory and Behavior. Theories of causation, methods of treatment, preventive programs, and the practices of institutions and agencies working with crime and criminals. Prerequisites: SOC 1013, 2023.  Fall.

SOC 4123, 5123. Seminar in Sociology. An analysis of selected aspects of social organizations. Prerequisite: nine hours sociology.  On demand.

SOC 4173. (WI) Research Problems. An analysis of current problems, and development in sociological study with emphasis on acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of social information. Includes directed research relating to educational, occupational, and community problems of sociological significance. Designed to encourage the student to apply sociological principles and concepts to practical social problems with coordination and sharing of research problems and results as they develop. Prerequisite: 12 hours in social sciences including at least six hours of sociology.  On demand. 

SOC 4183, 5183. Death and Dying. An inquiry into various issues in dying, death, and bereavement, with attention to existing research, pertinent theory, relevant social organization and processes, and philosophical and ethical questions. An experiential study which examines feelings and attitudes toward death of others and of oneself.  Spring.

SOC 4213. (WI) Research Methods. The principal techniques of sociological analysis with emphasis on measurement and design.  Fall, Spring.

SOC 4223. Childhood Socialization. A study of the processes and outcomes of socialization from birth to adolescence. Special attention is given to subcultural patterns and the different agencies of socialization. Prerequisite: SOC 1013 or consent of the instructor.  Prerequisite: SOC 1013 or consent of the instructor.  Summer.

SOC 4263. Stratification and Poverty.  A study of the social forces and processes leading to socio-economic inequality and how this is manifested in the class structure of our society.  A special focus is given to the impact of poverty. Prerequisite: six hours of sociology.  Every other Fall.

SOC 4293. Sociology of Gender Roles. A study of the changing roles of women and men in American society. Comparisons are made with other societies. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: SOC 1013 or consent of instructor.  On demand.

SOC 4303. Urban Sociology. An examination of the influence of urbanization upon the social, economic, intellectual, and cultural aspects of life. An analysis of techniques of urban research and a consideration of the international, national, state, and local methods of urban development. Prerequisite: SOC 1013 or consent of the instructor.  On demand.

SOC 4323. (WI) Senior Thesis.  A capstone course  for  all  seniors  majoring in sociology  involving  the  realization  of  the sociological  imagination exemplifying the process of theory, conceptualization, research methods, operationalization, observations,   data   processing, and analysis  in a directed project.   Students will make an oral presentation of their project results through a departmentally approved review process or an approved undergraduate symposium.  Prerequisites: SOC 3103, SOC 4213, and SOC 3113.  Fall, Spring.

SOC 4383. Social Gerontology. An introduction to the sociology of aging; analysis of aging in its individual, social, and cultural aspects. Prerequisite: six hours of sociology.  Fall.

SOC 4443. Human Services for the Aged. Consideration of programs at the federal, state, local, and private levels. Preparation in planning, coordination, and administration of multipurpose institutions for the aged.  Spring.

SOC 4483. Medical Sociology. An examination of the institution of medicine and social causation of disease, illness, and rehabilitation. Topics include health‑care service delivery, social aspects of healing, and the nature of the health profession.  Fall.

SOC 4503. Domestic Violence. This course will treat theories of physical and psychological violence and aggression as they apply to the interpersonal relationships within the home. Rape, child abuse, spouse battering, sibling abuse and elder abuse are focal topics.  Summer.

Courses in Anthropology

ANT 2013 (ANTH2013). Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. A survey of traditional, non‑European cultures around the world in the present and recent past. Using anthropological   theories  and   methods,  the course  examines  similarities  and differences  between  cultures  in  the  way people solve common human problems.  Select societies will be examined in detail.  Every other Spring.

ANT 2023 (ANTH1013). Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archeology. Prehistoric human cultural development is examined through evidence from fossils, tools and archeological sites. Related data from primate studies, genetics and cultural anthropology are used to examine current theories of human biological and cultural origins and development. Methods and techniques of physical anthropology and archeology are reviewed.  Every other Spring.

ANT 3043. North American Indians. Survey of American Indian cultures north of Mexico, including an examination of their origins, prehistory and archeology, and cultural diversity. A selection of Indian cultures in each of the geographic subdivisions of North America will be examined in detail, including Indians of Arkansas. Similarities and differences among Indian groups in respect to ecology, as well as social, political and religious cultural subsystems will be explored. Meets the non-Western Cultural requirement.  Spring.

ANT 4053, 5053. World Cultures.  A worldwide survey of traditional non-Western cultures, from small scale foragers and farmers to socially complex Non-Europeans of the recent past and present. We will look comparatively at ways that different people solve universal human problems, examine closely a sample of cultures to consider the interconnections among social, ideological and material aspects of life and consider relationships between Western and non-Western cultures on issues of worldwide concern like ecological change, warfare, and industrialization.  Meets the non-Western Cultural requirement.  Fall, Spring.

ANT 3096.  Archeological Field School.  This course is an intensive practicum in archeological field research methods.  Students learn techniques of site survey, excavation, recording, and artifact identification through participation in an archeological dig.  Summer.

ANT 4083, 5083.  Readings and Research in Anthropology.   Designed   for individuals at the senior level to conduct independent reading and research into selected topics of problem areas in any of the subfields of anthropology.  On demand.

Courses in Human Services

HS 4143.  Special Topics.   This elective is designed for faculty to teach special courses in their areas of expertise, to offer courses for particular interest to students, and to address contemporary issues in the study of sociology, criminal justice, and human services.  The topics will vary each time the course is taught, and will be announced when the course is offered.  Senior level special topics may include Sociology of Religion, Corrections, Victimization, The Aging Criminal Population and Social Issues, Cultural Study Trips.  The course may be repeated when a different topic is taught.  Maximum of 6 hours will count toward the degree.  Prerequisites: Senior or above standing.  On demand.

HS 2013. Introduction to Human Services. A survey of human services as a field of study, with exploration of basic values and concepts underlying human services practice.  Fall, Spring.

HS 3023.  Social Welfare Policy and Institutions. Study of the origin and development of social welfare institutions, their organizational structure, and their mode of operation. Critical analysis of social policy is emphasized. Prerequisite: HS 2013.  Fall.

HS 3033. Methods I. Introduction to basic objectives, skills, tasks, and activities essential to generic human services. Educationally directed field instruction is introduced via field experience in selected human services agencies. Prerequisite: HS 2013 or consent of the instructor.  Fall.

HS 4043 (WI). Human Behavior and the Social Environment. Application of the social system model to the behavioral aspects of societies, communities, organizations, groups, the family, and the person. Prerequisite: HS 2013.  Fall.

HS 4052. (WI) Methods II. Continuing study and refinement of basic processes, skills, and professional activities essential to the entry level of human services practice. Content includes casework intervention methods, group work, and community practice. Prerequisites: HS 2013, HS 3023, HS 3033, HS 4043.  Spring.

HS 4066, 4076. Field Experience. Educationally directed field experience, with block placements in selected social welfare agencies, incorporating field instruction by qualified practitioners. Limited to the human services major. Prerequisite: 12 hours of Human Services courses.  Spring.

HS 4081. (WI) Practice Seminar. Combines selected readings, reports, research, and group projects with analysis and discussion of situations encountered by the student human services worker in field experience. To be taken concurrently with HS 4066, 4076. Prerequisite: HS 2013, HS 3023, HS 3033 or SOC 3273, HS 4043.  Spring.

HS 4183. Death and Dying. Inquiry into various issues in dying, death, and bereavement, with attention to existing research, pertinent theory, relevant social organization and processes, and philosophical and ethical questions. An experimental study which examines feelings and attitudes toward the death of others and of oneself.  Spring.

HS 4443. Human Services for the Aged.  Consideration of programs at the federal, state, local, and private levels. Preparation in planning, coordination and administration of multipurpose institutions for the aged.  Spring.