English, Foreign Language and Philosophy

Download English, Foreign Language & Philosophy Catalog 

Faculty: Dr. Clinton Atchley, Chair; Dr. Melanie Angell, Mr. Eric Bailey, Dr. Stephanie Barron, Ms. Jill Batson, Dr. Marck Beggs, Ms. Carley Cate, Dr. Jennifer Dawes, Dr. MaryJane Dunn, Mr. Greg Gibson, Dr. Wal Gudrian, Dr. Nydia Jeffers, Dr. Beth Maxfield,  Dr. Vernon Miles, Dr. Margarita Peraza-Rugeley, Dr. Patti Poblette, Dr. Peggy Sturba, Dr. Suzanne Tartamella, Dr. David Thomson, Dr. Steven Todd

The mission of the Department of English, Foreign Languages, and Philosophy is to provide students with a strong background in English, French, German, and Spanish languages and literature and in the discipline of philosophy.

The English curriculum is designed to offer students the opportunity to enhance their critical thinking, reading, and writing skills and develop knowledge and appreciation of the English language and the literatures of various traditions and civilizations. Students majoring or minoring in English also acquire the analytic skills and aesthetic sensibilities which enable them to read, understand, appreciate, and evaluate significant works of literature and other texts. The professional mission of the department in English instruction is to produce quality graduates who possess the knowledge and skills necessary for success as public school teachers, graduate students, students of law, or professionals in the world of government and business.

The foreign language curriculum is designed to meet the varying needs for linguistic competence in today's world. The emphasis in the first two years of study is on the acquisition of functional language skills and on the development of an understanding of the contemporary cultures of the countries involved. As students progress to the more advanced levels, they further refine their communicative language skills while having the opportunity to study literature, culture, and civilization. The professional mission of the foreign language programs is to build, first of all, a useful degree of functional language skills and cultural sensitivity.   Through the   study of   foreign languages, students become acquainted with other modes of thought, expression, and cultural perspective and have the opportunity to experience literary masterpieces in their original languages. Courses are available leading to the major and minor in Spanish and to minors in French and German.

The philosophy curriculum is designed to provide students with the opportunities to develop the ability to think logically and critically, to speak and write effectively, to appreciate the complexity and diversity of world cultures, to understand the physical universe, and to participate as concerned, intelligent citizens in the discipline and in the wider world.  The professional mission of the philosophy program is to help students develop the ability to see the interconnectedness of all of the academic disciplines, to problem-solve in creative and interdisciplinary ways, and to acquire the skills to succeed in graduate work in philosophy and other disciplines, as students of law, or professionals in medicine, politics, education, and business.

English 

Major Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in English 

Hours
ENG 2013, 2023        World Literature*    6
ENG 3036, 3073 Survey of American Literature           6
ENG 3083, 3093 Survey of English Literature    6
Directed English Electives**  18 
Total hours required for major in English

  36

*These six hours meet the liberal arts core requirement normally fulfilled by Studies in Literature (ENG 2053) or Masters of Western Literature Honors (ENG 2793). A student may take Studies in Literature or Masters of Western Literature Honors before declaring as an English major, but only 3 hours of Studies in Literature or Masters of Western Literature Honors will substitute for World Lit I, but not for World Lit II. 

**The department strongly recommends that students choose elective courses that will expose them to a broad range of genres and historical periods.

To receive a degree with a major in English, a student must complete a minimum of six (6) semester hours of upper-division courses in English with a grade of "C" or better at Henderson, regardless of the number of hours of transfer credit.

Also see institutional requirements for the Bachelor of Arts. 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in English with Teacher Licensure      

In addition to the requirements listed above, students seeking teacher licensure in English must earn a minimum of nine (9) hours of 3000- or 4000-level courses in English at Henderson (regardless of work taken elsewhere) and earn a grade of C or better in each course.  ENG 4843 Special Methods: English may not be used to fulfill this requirement.  Directed English Electives must include ENG 4163 Modern Grammar, ENG 4453 Advanced Composition, ENG 4563 Literature for Adolescents and Young Adults, and ENG 4103 Shakespeare.  Students seeking Teacher Licensure must also complete the Professional Education Curriculum for 7-12 teachers [listed under Secondary (7-12) Education in the Teachers College chapter of this catalog] and must fulfill the requirements for Education Track BA/BS (shown in The Senior College section of Undergraduate Curricula chapter of this catalog).  Students seeking Teacher Licensure must pass six (6) hours of the same foreign language.

English Minor Requirements

Hours
ENG 2013, 2023        World Literature*    6
ENG 3063, 3073 Survey of American Literature, or    
ENG 3083, 3093 Survey of English Literature    6
ENG 4163 Modern Grammar    3
Directed English Elective    3
Total hours required for minor in English **

  18

*These six hours meet the liberal arts core requirement normally fulfilled by Studies in Literature (ENG 2053) or Masters of Western Literature Honors (ENG 2793).  If a student declares an English minor after having taken Studies in Literature or Masters of Western Literature Honors, that student may substitute either class for World Lit I, but not for World Lit II.

**If students minoring in English desire teacher certification, they must take an additional six (6) hours of electives, including ENG 4453-Advanced Composition. English minors taking the Survey of American Literature must choose elective courses in English literature; likewise, those taking the Survey of English Literature must choose elective courses in American literature (24 hours required for certification).

Also see institutional requirements for the Bachelor of Arts. 

Writing Specialization Minor

The 18-hour writing specialization minor in English is designed for students planning to enter careers or professions such as business, law, public administration, journalism, the sciences, and other areas in which writing ability is a crucial qualification.   A student majoring in English may not declare a Writing Specialization minor.  An English major may have completion of Writing Specialization requirements noted on the transcript.

Required Courses Hours Semester Offered
ENG 2133 Rhetoric and Argument   3 Fall
ENG 4163 Modern Grammar*   3 Fall, Summer II
ENG 3613 Technical Writing   3 Fall, Spring
ENG 4453 Advanced Composition*   3 Fall, Spring
ENG 4983 Advanced Creative Writing*+   3 Spring (odd numbered years)

One (1) elective from the following list 

MMC 4223 Magazine and Feature Writing    3 **
MMC 4293 Creative Non-Fiction   3 **
MMC 4303 Online Journalism   3 **
Total hours required   18
*May count as English Major electives
+Prerequisite: ENG 2503 Introduction to Creative Writing
**Check with Communications and Theatre Arts Department

Creative Writing Certificate

The Creative Writing Certificate is a minimum 12-credit-hour (4-course) program designed to provide students with the tools for a deeper understanding of how to use language to express the intricacies of human experience.  The Creative Writing Certificate gives students the opportunity to undertake creative writing projects—especially the writing of poetry, fiction, screenplays, and non-fiction—which emphasize the process of writing as well as the end product.  In their classes, students read and study a variety of key published works, write from prompts and assignments, and learn techniques for harnessing their own creative resources.  The peer workshop, or group critique of student writing, is the cornerstone of growth as a writer.

Required Courses Hours
ENG 2503 Introduction to Creative Writing              3
ENG 3143 Form and Theory: Poetry, or
ENG 3153 Form and Theory: Fiction   3

ONE of the following  

MMC 3493 Preproduction, or
THA 2413 Playwriting, or
MMC 4293 Creative Nonfiction, or
MMC 4223 Magazine and Feature Writing, or
ENG 4___ Any 4000-level literature course   3
ENG 4983 Advanced Creative Writing   3
Total hours required  12



Courses in English

The prerequisite for all 2000-level and above English courses is satisfactory completion (with a grade of C or higher) of Freshman English (ENG 1463 and ENG 1473 or their equivalents). 

ENG 0423.  Basic English. A course designed for those students with ACT scores in English in a range mandated by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education. The course emphasizes a basic review of grammar and usage. Students will work on developing quality theses, topic sentences, paragraphs, and essays in preparation for the work of credit-level composition. ENG 0423 is a non-degree-credit course. If required, must be completed with a “C” or better.

ENG 1463 (ENGL1013).  Freshman English A. A course designed primarily to develop in the student, by working with a variety of texts, the ability to read with understanding and appreciation, to think coherently, to gain knowledge of the structure of the language, and to write clearly and effectively. Must be completed with a “C” or better. Prerequisite: ACT score in English of 19, or equivalent score on alternate test, or a “C” or better in ENG 0423.

ENG 1473 (ENGL1023).  Freshman English B.  A course designed as a sequel to ENG 1463 to refine the ability to think logically and coherently; to read with understanding, critical acumen, and appreciation; to gain further knowledge of the structure of the language; and to write clearly and effectively. The study of short stories, poetry, drama, and essays provides topical ideas for essays. Must be completed with a “C” or better before enrolling in any other English course. Prerequisite: ENG 1463 with a grade of “C” or better.

ENG 1803.  Honors Freshman English. A course focusing on the writing process, particularly as it relates to analysis, evaluation, and argumentation. The study of fiction, poetry, and drama provides the student the opportunity to read carefully and critically, to cultivate an appreciation of literature, and to work toward both oral and written expression characterized by clarity, coherence, completeness, economy, specificity, and correctness. Substitutes for ENG 1473, Freshman English B. Prerequisite: honors standing.

ENG 2013.  World Literature I (ENGL2113).  A survey of major works of world literature through the 17th century.  Prerequisites:  ENG 1463 and ENG 1473 (or equivalent preparation) with a "C" or better.  Counts toward the English major and minor.

ENG 2023. World Literature II (ENGL2123).  A survey of major works of world literature from the 18th century to the present.  Prerequisites:  ENG 1463 and ENG 1473 (or equivalent preparation) with a "C" or better.  Counts toward the English major and minor.

ENG 2053 (ENGL2213).  Studies in Literature.  A general education course designed to offer students opportunities to read closely, analyze, evaluate, discuss, write about, and come to appreciate great literature.  Depending upon the instructor, the course may be genre based, author based, period based, or any combination.  Check with instructor for class focus.  Prerequisites:  ENG 1463 and ENG 1473 (or equivalent preparation) with a “C” or better. 

ENG 2133.  Rhetoric and Argument.  A writing course designed to develop reasoning skills, persuasion techniques, and revising strategies in order to maximize effectiveness of argumentation.  By examining readings on both sides of controversial issues, students will learn to evaluate evidence, identify errors in logic, and prepare counterarguments. Class discussion on the readings and the issues will also give students opportunity to develop public debating skills.  Does not count toward English major or minor.

ENG 2503 (ENGL2013).  Introduction to Creative Writing. A combination lecture/workshop course in which students will produce and critique original works of poetry and fiction.  Students will also study issues related to contemporary literary styles and publication (both in print and on the Internet).  Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of freshman English requirements. Does not count toward English major or minor.

ENG 2793.  Masters of Western Literature-Honors.   A general education course designed to offer students opportunities to read, analyze, evaluate, discuss, write about, and come to appreciate works by writers in the Western tradition.  Begins with works from the ancient period and continues to works from the contemporary era.  Individual and group projects augment the curriculum.  Prerequisites:  ENG 1463 and ENG 1473 (or equivalent preparation) with a “C” or better.

ENG 3043.  Non-Western Literature.  A study of the literature of those cultures not included in the Western tradition.  Texts read in the course will include those by Africans, Asians, Latin Americans, and writings from the nations of Islam.  Readings may include classical non-Western works at the discretion of the instructor; however, the major focus of the course will be on more contemporary texts to provide students with some insight into divergent world views as seen through modern non-Western literature. Fulfills non-western requirement and 3 hours of English major or minor.

ENG 3063. Survey of American Literature I.  A survey covering significant writers and works from the pre-colonial and/or colonial periods through the Civil War. 

ENG 3073. Survey of American Literature II.  A survey covering significant writers and works after the Civil War and through the contemporary period.

ENG 3083.  Survey of English Literature I. A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Enlightenment.

ENG 3093.  Survey of English Literature II. A survey of British literature from the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods.

ENG 3143.  Form and Theory: Poetry.  Students in this course will focus on the theories and aesthetics of contemporary poetry.  How has it evolved from the Modern Era? What kind of formal choices are contemporary poets making within their work?  Readings will include theory and poetry and will cover, but not be limited to, such topics as prosody, imagery, diction, and voice.  Some literary criticism will be included, but primary attention will be given to essays by poets writing about their own processes. Prerequisites: ENG 2503.

ENG 3153.  Form and Theory: Fiction. Students in this course will focus on the theories and aesthetics of contemporary fiction.  How has it evolved from the Modern Era? What kind of formal choices are contemporary writers making within their work?  Readings will include theory and fiction and will cover, but not be limited to, such topics as viewpoint, characters, style, plot, story structure, and setting.  Some literary criticism will be included, but primary attention will be given to essays by writers writing about their own processes. Prerequisites: ENG 2503. 

ENG 3313.  University Writing.  A course designed to enhance students’ critical, analytical, and writing skills by working with a variety of texts. Must be completed with a “C” or better. Does not count toward the English major or minor. Can fulfill the junior/senior-level writing course requirement in the Liberal Arts Core.

ENG 3613.  Technical Writing.  A service course for majors in business, pre-engineering, nursing, pre-law, mass media, and the sciences.  Required for Writing Specialization minor. Does not count toward the English major or minor. Can fulfill the junior/senior-level writing course requirement in the Liberal Arts Core. 

ENG 4103, 5103. (WI) Shakespeare.  An intensive study of the poetry and plays of William Shakespeare.  Required for teacher certification in English.

ENG 4123, 5123. (WI) Renaissance Literature of England.  A survey of the major historians, poets, and dramatists of the late 16th and early 17th centuries, excluding Shakespeare.

ENG 4143, 5143.  Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Tutoring and Teaching Writing.  Both graduate and undergraduate students enrolled in this course will engage in an intensive study of the scholarly literature and practices of one-on-one peer tutoring and the teaching of writing. Prerequisites: ENG 1463 and ENG 1473 with a “C” or better.

ENG 4163, 5163.  Modern Grammar.  An analysis of the English language through descriptive, generative, and performance models.  Content includes intensive analysis of the structure and syntax of English.  Required for teacher certification in English.

ENG 4173, 5173. (WI) Modern Drama.  A study of American and European drama from 1890 to 1960.

ENG 4193, 5193. (WI) Victorian Literature.  A study of prose and poetry of the British Victorian era.

ENG 4203, 5203. (WI) English Romantic Literature. A study of the tenets of Romanticism and a survey of significant texts of the British Romantic Period.

ENG 4213, 5213.  English and Its Development.  A study of the development of the English language from its earliest recorded varieties to its present-day varieties.  Entails the examination of changes that have taken place in its phonology, morphology, lexicon, orthography, and syntax.  To account for these changes, students will examine the language within the ebb and flow of its social, political, and intellectual contexts.

ENG 4223, 5223. (WI) American Novel.  A study of significant American novelists from the early republic through the contemporary period.

ENG 4303, 5303. (WI) Literature of the American South.  A study of selected authors and texts originating from and/or commenting upon the southern United States, the Caribbean, Central America, and/or South America.  This course also involves the examination of Southern Literature as a category, tracing its formation, evolution, and revision from colonial times through the present. 

ENG 4323, 5323. (WI) Greek Drama.  A study of tragedy and comedy from the classical Greek period.

ENG 4353, 5353. (WI) Eighteenth-Century English Literature.  A survey of poetry and prose from the Restoration and Enlightenment through the earliest manifestations of British Romanticism.

ENG 4403, 5403. Topics in Women’s Literature.   This course will focus on poetry, prose, and/or drama by women.  Topics will vary.  For example, the course may be a survey of literature written by women of a particular period, movement, or culture, an examination of the works of an individual woman writer, or a cross-cultural exploration of a particular theme within women’s literature.  Course content varies, so students may take this course twice for a total of six hours of credit if the topics are different. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

ENG 4453, 5453. (WI) Advanced Composition.  An emphasis on composing texts that range in form and content, including research and argumentation. Attention to scholarly and academic writing conventions is emphasized. Required for teacher certification in English. Can fulfill the junior/senior-level writing course requirement in the Liberal Arts Core. 

ENG 4533, 5533. (WI) The Romantic Movement in American Literature. A study of the characteristics of the American Romantic Movement in literature and a survey of representative writers of the period.

ENG 4563, 5563.  Literature for Adolescents and Young Adults.  A study of western and nonwestern literature for and about adolescents and/or young adults; critical study, interpretation, and evaluation of the genre; examination of modes and themes found in the literature; selection of literature appropriate for use in 7th-12th grade classrooms.   Selections span classic to contemporary and include the play, novel, short story, poem, graphic novel, film, and other genres appropriate for and attractive to adolescents and young adults, as well as interdisciplinary methods, media, and materials for selecting, teaching, assessing, facilitating, and encouraging student reading, including English language learners.  Standards of both NCTE/CAEP and CCSS are addressed.  Required for Teacher Licensure in English.  Open to all students, including English majors and minors, who have satisfactorily completed Freshman English requirements.

ENG 4583, 5583. (WI) International Short Story. A study of the short story as a genre, including its history and development up to the present. Writers from various countries will be represented.

ENG 4593, 5593. (WI) English Novel: 1830-1950.   A study of significant British novels of the Victorian and modern eras.

ENG 4603, 5603. (WI) Contemporary Literature. An emphasis on post-World War II American and British fiction with some attention to nonfiction, poetry, and drama.

ENG 4633, 5633. (WI) Introduction to Literary Criticism. A study of the various approaches to literary criticism, their historical development, and their practical applications. Students will also examine the close relationship between criticism and literary research.

ENG 4643, 5643. (WI) Rhetoric and Composition. This course reviews rhetorical theories from classic through contemporary, with an emphasis on the application of theory to the teaching of composition.  Includes grounding in the development of composition as an academic discipline as well as modern uses and misuses of rhetoric in the public sphere.

ENG 4653, 5653. (WI) Medieval Literature.   A study of representative British, Scandinavian, Icelandic, and Continental texts dating from 450-1500 CE.

ENG 4663, 5663. (WI) Introduction to Linguistics. A survey of major historical schools of linguistics with emphasis upon contemporary theory and its application to the understanding and teaching of English.

ENG 4673, 5673. (WI) English Novel to 1830.   A study of significant British novels through the early 19th century with emphasis on the evolution of the novel form.

ENG 4843. Special Methods: English. Special  methods in the teaching of  English.  Required for Teacher Licensure in English.  Does not count toward English major or minor.

ENG 4963, 5963.  Special Topics.  This course focuses on various genres and themes in literature and language as well as individual authors. Topics may include, but are not limited to, specialized literature and/or writing, as the professor deems appropriate. Course content varies, so students may take this course twice for a total of six hours of credit if the topics are different. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

ENG 4983, 5983.  Advanced Creative Writing.  In this course, students will not only continue to develop and refine the portfolios they started in Introduction to Creative Writing, but will also delve more deeply into the intellectual life of the writer.  To that end, contemporary fiction and poetry will be analyzed through a series of book reviews and formal explications of individual poems, stories, plays, and other creative projects.  Prerequisite:  ENG 2503 or consent of instructor.

French

The French program offers courses that fulfill the foreign language requirement for the B.A. degree and more advanced courses for French minors.  Freshmen and transfer students seeking a B.A. degree and choosing to satisfy the foreign language requirement by taking French are required to take FRE 1013 (French 1)—unless they have already taken and passed, at an accredited and approved institution, a university-level French course OR they have passed the appropriate CLEP test.  (Students can receive up to twelve hours of CLEP credit for French, but the test must be taken before students begin taking courses in university-level French.).   French courses should be taken sequentially and without interruption.

French Minor Requirements are 15 hours, three hours of which must be 3000-level or above.

Courses in French

FRE 1013 (FREN1013).  French 1.  A beginning course designed for the student having little or no knowledge of French. Emphasis on basic oral and aural skills necessary to participate in simple conversations about one's immediate environment.   Development of  reading and writing skills needed for basic functioning in a French-speaking situation. In the context of the development of language skills,  students are introduced to contemporary culture and customs of the French-speaking world. Stress is placed on vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation and command of elementary structure.

FRE 1023 (FREN1023).  French 2.  A continuation of FRE 1013. Continued vocabulary acquisition, development of conversational and comprehension skills. Further development of reading and writing skills. Students learn to express a sequence of events and deal with the expression of more abstract ideas. Cultural emphasis is on the modern world with readings from contemporary sources.  Prerequisite: FRE 1013 or equivalent.

FRE 1146.  Intensive Elementary French.  Similar to FRE 1013, 1023.  Offered only as part of special programs.

FRE 2033 (FREN2013).  French 3.  A course designed for those having command of the basic structures of French. Further development of conversational, aural comprehension, reading and writing skills. Cultural emphasis is primarily on the modern world; however,  materials  selected provide insight into the roots of modern culture. Prerequisite: FRE 1023 or equivalent. (FRE 2033 is considered upper-level credit in computing the required number of hours of senior college work.)

FRE 2043 (FREN2023).  French 4.  A continuation of FRE 2033 designed to increase the student's conversational, comprehension, reading and writing skills. Materials are selected to provide a wide range of linguistic experience and cultural insight. Prerequisite: FRE 2033 or equivalent. (FRE 2043 is considered upper-level credit in computing the required number of hours of senior college work.)

FRE 2156.  Intensive Intermediate French.  Similar to French 2033, 2043.    Offered only as part of special programs.

FRE 3093.  Advanced French Conversation and Composition. A course designed specifically to increase the student's conversational fluency and writing proficiency on a wide variety of topics. Opportunity for individualized projects designed to meet the needs of the individual student for specialized or technical language. Prerequisite: FRE 2033 or equivalent.

FRE 3201-3.  Independent Study. A course designed to meet the needs of the individual student. Prerequisite: FRE 2043. Permission to enroll must be granted by the foreign language coordinator and the instructor.

FRE 3223.  French Culture and Civilization. A course of readings and lectures exploring the historical development of France emphasizing the contributions   made to the arts,  sciences, philosophy, and political thought. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: FRE 2033 or equivalent.

FRE 3243.  Introduction to French Literature. An overview of the major periods of French literature. Provides an introduction to the "explication du text," a writing technique commonly used in literary criticism and analysis. Reading selections include short works and excerpts in modern French. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: FRE 2033 or equivalent.

FRE 4873.  Special Methods.  Special Methods in the teaching of foreign language.  Pre-requisite FRE 2033.  Does not count toward the French minor.  Cross-listed as GER 4873 and SPA 4873. 

German

The German program offers courses that fulfill the foreign language requirement for the B.A. degree and more advanced courses for German minors.  Freshmen and transfer students seeking a B.A. degree and choosing to satisfy the foreign language requirement by taking German are required to take GER 1013 (German 1)—unless they have already taken and passed, at an accredited and approved institution, a university-level German course OR they have passed the appropriate CLEP test.  (Students can receive up to twelve hours of CLEP credit for German, but the test must be taken before students begin taking courses in university-level German.).   German courses should be taken sequentially and without interruption.

German Minor Requirements are 15 hours, three hours of which must be 3000-level or above. 

Courses in German

GER 1013 (GERM1013).  German 1.  A beginning course designed for the student having little or no knowledge of German. Emphasis on basic oral and aural skills necessary to participate in simple conversations about one's immediate environment. Development of reading and writing skills needed for basic functioning in a German-speaking situation. In the context of the development of language skills, students are introduced to contemporary culture and customs of the German-speaking world. Stress is placed on vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation and command of elementary structure.

GER 1023 (GERM1023).  German 2.  A continuation of GER 1013. Continued vocabulary acquisition, development of conversational and comprehension skills. Further development of reading and writing skills. Students learn to express a sequence of events and deal with the expression of more abstract ideas. Cultural emphasis is on the modern world with readings from contemporary sources.  Prerequisite: GER 1013 or equivalent.  

GER 1146.  Intensive Elementary German.  Similar to GER 1013 and 1023.  Offered only as part of special programs.

GER 2033 (GERM2013).  German 3.  A course designed for those having command of the basic structures of German. Further development of conversational, aural comprehension, reading and writing skills. Cultural emphasis is primarily on the modern world; however, materials selected provide insight into the roots of modern culture. Prerequisite: GER 1023 or equivalent. (GER 2033 taken at Henderson may be considered upper-level credit in computing the required number of hours of senior college work.)

GER 2043 (GERM2023).  German 4.  A continuation of GER 2033 designed to increase the student's conversational, comprehension, reading and writing skills. Materials are selected to provide a wide range of linguistic experience and cultural insight. Prerequisite: GER 2033 or equivalent. (GER 2043 taken at Henderson may be considered upper-level credit in computing the required number of hours of senior college work.)

GER 2156.  Intensive Intermediate German.  Similar to German 2033 and German 2043.  Offered only as part of special programs.

GER 3093.   Advanced German Conversation and Composition. A course designed specifically to increase the student's conversational fluency and writing proficiency on a wide variety of topics. Opportunity for individualized projects designed to meet the needs of the individual student for specialized or technical language. Prerequisite: GER 2033 or equivalent.

GER 3201-3.  Independent Study. A course designed to meet the needs of the individual student. Prerequisite: GER 2043 or equivalent. Permission to enroll must be granted by the foreign languages coordinator and the instructor.  Only two Independent Study classes may count toward the major.

GER 3223.  German Culture and Civilization. Readings and lectures exploring the culture and civilization of the German-speaking world from prehistoric times to the present. Covers major contributions in art, architecture, music, literature, philosophy, and the sciences. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: GER 2033 or equivalent.

GER 3243.  Introduction to German Literature. A historical overview of German literature providing an introduction to significant genres, major authors and periods, including the folk tradition. Reading selections include short works and excerpts in modern German. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: GER 2033 or equivalent.

GER 4873.  Special Methods.  Special Methods in the teaching of foreign language.  Pre-requisite GER 2033.  Does not count toward the German minor.  Cross-listed as FRE 4873 and SPA 4873.

Spanish

The Spanish curriculum provides students with the opportunity to learn a foreign language spoken by millions of people throughout the world and to learn about a variety of distinct Spanish-speaking cultures.  The program offers courses that fulfill the foreign language requirement for the B.A. degree and more advanced courses for Spanish majors and minors.  Freshmen and transfer students seeking a B.A. degree and choosing to satisfy the foreign language requirement by taking Spanish are required to take SPA 1013 (Spanish 1)—unless they have already taken and passed, at an accredited and approved institution, a university-level Spanish course OR they have passed the appropriate CLEP test.  (Students can receive up to twelve hours of CLEP credit for Spanish, but the test must be taken before students begin taking courses in university-level Spanish.) Spanish courses should be taken sequentially and without interruption.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish                         

       SPA     2033 and 2043            Spanish 3 and 4 (6 hours)

       SPA     3063                            Advanced Spanish Conversation (3 hours)

       SPA     3073                            Advanced Spanish Composition (3 hours)

       Either  SPA 3613 or 3623       Culture and Civ (of Spain or Lat. Am.; 3 hours)

       Either  SPA 3533 or 4053       Translation or Advanced Grammar (3 hours)

Choose Two

     {SPA 3243, 3253, 4123, 4133, 4513, 4523}   Hispanic/Spa. Am. Literature (6 hours)

Additional Directed Electives

                                                      May include approved Study Abroad (12 hours)

Total Required Hours for Major (36 hours)                                                                      

*Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 do not count toward the Spanish major in the B.A. program. Students not earning credit in Spanish 3 and 4 must take an additional 6 hours of directed electives in order to earn the required 36 hours for the major.

To receive a B.A. degree in Spanish from Henderson State University, a student must complete at Henderson a minimum of nine (9) semester hours of upper-division course work in Spanish with a grade of "C" or better.

Students wishing to pursue a career in teaching Spanish are encouraged to speak with Teachers College about Masters level opportunities available after completion of a Bachelors degree. 

Spanish Minor

Minor requirements are 18 hours, at least six hours of which must be 3000-level or above.  To earn a minor in Spanish from Henderson State University, a student must pass—with a C or better—at least six hours of 3000-level or above course work in Spanish at Henderson.

Courses in Spanish

SPA 1013 (SPAN1013).  Spanish 1.  A beginning  course  designed for the student having little or no knowledge of Spanish. Emphasis on basic oral and aural skills necessary to participate in simple conversations about one's immediate environment. Development of reading and writing skills needed for basic functioning in a Spanish-speaking situation. In the context of the development of language skills, students are introduced to contemporary culture and customs of the Spanish-speaking world. Stress is placed on vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation and command of elementary structure.

SPA 1023 (SPAN1023).  Spanish 2.  A continuation of SPA 1013. Continued vocabulary acquisition, development of conversational and comprehension skills. Further development of reading and writing skills. Students learn to express a sequence of events and deal with the expression of more abstract ideas. Cultural emphasis is on the modern world with readings from contemporary sources.  Prerequisite: SPA 1013 or equivalent.

SPA 1146.  Intensive Spanish 1 and 2.  Similar to SPA 1013, 1023.  Normally offered only during summer sessions.

SPA 2033 (SPAN2013).  Spanish 3.  A course designed for those having command of the basic structures of Spanish. Further development of conversational, aural comprehension, reading and writing skills. Cultural emphasis is primarily on the modern world; however, materials selected provide insight into the roots of modern culture.  Prerequisite: SPA 1023 or equivalent. (SPA 2033 is considered upper-level credit in computing the required number of hours of senior college work.)

SPA 2043 (SPAN2023).  Spanish 4.  A continuation of SPA 2033 designed to increase the student's conversational, comprehension, reading and writing skills. Materials are selected to provide a wide range of linguistic experience and cultural insight. Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent. (SPA 2043 is considered upper-level credit in computing the required number of hours of senior college work.)

SPA 2156.  Intensive Spanish 3 and 4.  Similar to SPA 2033, 2043.  Normally offered only during summer sessions.

SPA 3063. Advanced Spanish Conversation.  A course designed specifically to increase conversational fluency in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent. Required for majors.

SPA 3073. (WI) Spanish Composition. A course designed specifically to increase writing proficiency in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent. Required for majors.

SPA 3201-3.  Independent Study. A course designed to meet the needs of the individual student. Prerequisite: SPA 2043. Permission to enroll must be granted by the instructor and the chair of the department.

SPA 3243. (WI) Introduction to Hispanic Literature.  A historical overview of Hispanic literature providing an introduction to the works of major authors and significant genres (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama).  Reading selections include short works and excerpts in modern Spanish.  Conducted primarily in Spanish.  Prerequisite:  SPA 2033 or equivalent.

SPA 3253. (WI) Hispanic Short Story.  Reading and discussion of short stories from a variety of authors, both from Spain and the New World.  Special emphasis given to the contemporary period.  Conducted primarily in Spanish.  Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent.

SPA 3533. (WI) Introduction to Spanish Translation.  A course designed for students seeking to refine their technical abilities in translating Spanish to English and English to Spanish.  Particular attention is given to the linguistic and socio-linguistic issues involved in the translation.  Contemporary sources such as short literary works as well as articles in a variety of fields are used as examples for the theory and practice of translation.  Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent. 

SPA 3613. (WI) Culture & Civilization of Spain.  Readings and lectures exploring the culture and civilization of Spain from early history to the present.  Conducted primarily in Spanish.  Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent.

SPA 3623. (WI) Culture & Civilization of Latin America.  Readings and lectures exploring the culture and civilization of the Spanish-speaking Americas from early history to the present.  Emphasis is placed on those aspects of culture which are common to all or many of the Spanish-speaking countries of the New World.  Conducted primarily in Spanish.  Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent.

SPA 4053.   Advanced Spanish Grammar.  A course designed for students seeking to refine their technical skills, especially in the written language.  Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum three hours of Spanish at or above the 3000-level.

SPA 4123.  (WI) Survey of Spanish American Literature I. A survey of major works from the period of discovery to the Mexican Revolution. Prerequisite: SPA 2043 or equivalent.

SPA 4133.  (WI) Survey of Spanish American Literature II. A survey of major works from the Mexican Revolution to the present. Prerequisite: SPA 2043 or equivalent.

SPA 4513.  (WI) Survey of Spanish Literature I. A survey of major works from the beginning through the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: SPA 2043 or equivalent.

SPA 4523.  (WI) Survey of Spanish Literature II. A survey of major works from the eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: SPA 2043 or equivalent.

SPA 4543. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics. Advanced study of the pronunciation, word formation, and sentence structure of Spanish.  Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent.

SPA 4553. Special Topics.  A course focusing on various genres, authors, and literary works in Spanish.  Course content varies, but students may expect to read, discuss, and write about prose (both fiction and non-fiction), poetry, and/or drama in Spanish.  Prerequisite:  SPA 2033 or equivalent.

SPA 4563. Independent Study Abroad.  Advanced study of Spanish and its culture(s) in a Spanish-speaking nation.  Prerequisite: SPA 2033 or equivalent.  Repeatable for up to twelve credit hours. 

SPA 4873. Special Methods. Special Methods in the teaching of foreign language.  Prerequisite:  SPA 2033.  Does not count toward the Spanish major or minor.  Cross-listed as FRE 4873 and GER 4873.

Philosophy

Logic Minor

Administered by the Philosophy program within the Department of English, Foreign Languages, and Philosophy.  Dr. Steven J. Todd, Director.  Requirements located in the Iinterdisciplinary Programs section.

Philosophy Minor

The 15-hour minor in Philosophy consists of a core of required courses and a set of electives.

Core (9 hours), one course (3 hours) from each of the following three sections:

         Introductory Component

                PHI   2013   Introduction to Philosophy or

                PHI   2083   Honors Introduction

         Historical Component

               PHI   4043   Ancient Philosophy or

               PHI   4053   Modern Philosophy or

               PHI   4073   20th Century Philosophy

         Logic Component

               PHI   2133    Logic I or

               PHI   4143    Logic II or

               ENG 2133    Rhetoric and Argument or

               MTH 2283    Discrete Mathematics

Electives (6 hours) - Choose 2 from the following:

               PHI   4003    Special Topics

               PHI   4013    Philosophy of Mind

               PHI   4043    Ancient Philosophy

               PHI   4053    Modern Philosophy

               PHI   4073    20th Century Philosophy

               PHI   4203    Asian Philosophy

               PHI   4253    Existentialism

               PHI   4233    Philosophy of Science

               PHI   2133    Logic I

               PHI   4143    Logic II

               PHI   3023    Religions of the World

               PHI   3063    Independent Study

               PHI   3113    Ethics

               HIS4713/PSC3073    Social and Political Thought

               COM  3113/5113    Rhetorical Theory

               ENG   4643    Rhetoric and Composition

               ENG   4663    Introduction to Linguistics

               ENG   2133    Rhetoric and Argument

               MTH   2283    Discrete Mathematics I

Total hours required for minor in Philosophy (15 Hours)

Courses in Philosophy

The philosophy curriculum is designed to provide students with the opportunities to develop the ability to think logically and critically, to speak and write effectively, to appreciate the complexity and diversity of world cultures, to understand the physical universe, and to participate as concerned, intelligent citizens in the discipline and in the wider world.  The professional mission of the philosophy program is to help students develop the ability to see the interconnectedness of all of the academic disciplines, to problem-solve in creative and interdisciplinary ways, and to acquire the skills to succeed in graduate work in philosophy and other disciplines, as students of law, or professionals in medicine, politics, education, and business.

PHI 2013 (PHIL1103). Introduction to Philosophy.  The study of fundamental philosophical issues, such as the character of reality, the limits of human knowledge, and requirements for a good life. The focus will be on understanding and critically evaluating traditional and contemporary philosophical positions through study of the works of major philosophers, using philosophical methods of argument. Prerequisite: ENG 1473 or ENG 1803 with a C or better.

PHI 2083. Introduction to Philosophy-Honors. An exploration of some fundamental problems of human life and its meaning.  Critical thinking about the nature of human knowledge and belief, the character of ultimate reality, and the status of values and the shape of moral life will be stressed.  Enrollment limited to honors students. Prerequisite: ENG 1803 with a C or better and Honors standing.

PHI 2133.  Logic I.  An introduction to symbolic logic. Along with discussion of propositional logic, natural deduction, truth tables and truth-trees, topics discussed may include one or more of the following: predicate logic, modal logic, non-classical logic, and / or meta-theory. Issues in the philosophy of logic will be discussed throughout.

PHI 4143, 5143. Logic II.  An advanced course in symbolic logic.  This course is a close study of modal logic and non-classical logic.  Issues in the philosophy of logic will be discussed throughout.  Prerequisites:  Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

PHI 3023.  Religions of the World.  This course is a hybrid.  On the one hand, it is designed to familiarize students with the wide variety of religious traditions that populate the world.  Some of the material will be very familiar to some and completely foreign to others; some will likely be completely new.  On the other hand, it is a philosophy course.  The central topics in the philosophy of religion concern the nature of the divine, the nature of humanity, the Problem of Evil, cosmogony and cosmology, fundamentalism, tolerance, and ethics.  In an increasingly globally integrated world, the questions raised by comparative religion and the coexistence of religions making rival claims have become inescapable.   We will treat both the variety of religions and their rather diverse responses to these and other philosophical questions.  This course satisfies the Non-Western general education requirement.

PHI 3063. Independent Study.

PHI 3113. Ethics.  An introduction to the development of Western philosophical ethical thought. This course will critically evaluate major ethical views. Topics may include the relationship between individual responsibility and social responsibility, the good life, or issues in applied ethics. Prerequisite: ENG 1473 or ENG 1803 with a C or better.

PHI 4003, 5003. (WI) Special Topics.  This course focuses on various topics of philosophical importance. Examples of such topics include Philosophy of Science and Asian Philosophy as well as courses on Metaphysics and Epistemology more generally. Course content varies, so students may take this course twice for a total of six hours of credit, but only when the topics are different. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

PHI 4013, 5013. Philosophy of Mind.  Critical study of the mind, both historical and contemporary. Topics discussed include consciousness, perception, the self, and the relationship between mind and body.  Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

PHI 4043, 5043. (WI) Ancient Philosophy.  Critical study of the early Western philosophers, primarily from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle. May include brief introduction to major Hellenistic philosophies such as Epicureanism, Stoicism, and Skepticism. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

PHI 4053, 5053. (WI) Modern Philosophy.  Critical study of representative work from major philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries, most notably Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

PHI 4073, 5073. (WI) 20th Century Philosophy. Critical study of the major developments in analytic philosophy through the 20th century (e.g., work by philosophers such as Russell, Kripke, and Quine). Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

PHI 4203, 5203. Asian Philosophy.  Critical examination of the philosophical motivations and justifications for various philosophical positions that developed in Ancient China and Ancient India, including Confucianism, Taoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Zen Buddhism.  Prerequisites:  Junior standing or consent of the instructor. This course satisfies the Non-Western general education requirement.

PHI 4253, 5253. Existentialism.  Critical examination of the philosophical movement now known as Existentialism, which developed in the 19th and 20th centuries, including work by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre, as well as literary works from authors such as Dostoyevsky and Kafka.  Prerequisites:  Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

PHI 4233, 5233. Philosophy of Science.  Critical evaluation of fundamental scientific concepts and methods.  Topics include:  science and pseudo-science, observation, confirmation, scientific laws, theories, and explanations, and the role of value in scientific inquiry.  Prerequisites:  Junior standing or consent of the instructor.