Social Sciences

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Faculty: Dr. Larry J. Monette, Chair; Dr. Boswell, Dr. Bowman, Dr. Carter, Dr. Graves, Dr. Gross, Dr. Hickerson, Dr. James, Dr. Kendie, Dr. Khan, Dr. Shaw.

The Department of Social Sciences offers courses in three primary subject areas: geography, history, and political science. Majors in history, political science, and public administration/public management are offered for those pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree through Henderson’s Ellis College of Arts and Sciences.  In addition, the department offers a major in social sciences for those pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Education degree through Henderson’s Teachers College.  This major is especially designed for students who plan to teach grades 7-12 social studies classes in the public schools.  Our department also offers minor fields of study in geography, history, international studies, political science, public administration and social sciences.

Our various majors and minors are especially designed for those who plan future careers in the law, law enforcement, the military, the ministry, public administration/public management, public history and library science, the State Department and foreign services, intelligence agencies, teaching, and related professions. When taking departmental courses, students learn to think critically and analytically, write clearly, and reflect upon the world and society’s problems and challenges.

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree (Social Sciences Major)

The Core Requirements (Must be completed prior to student teaching)

    HIS     1013                      World Civilization to 1660 (3 hours)

    HIS     1023 or 1043        World Civilization since 1660 (3 hours)

                                             Non-Western World History elective (3 hours)

    HIS     2053, 2063            United States History (6 hours)

    HIS     4240                      Social Sciences Research (0 hours)

    HIS     4263                      Arkansas and the Southwest (3 hours)

                                             United States History elective (3 hours)

    PSC    1013 or 1263        American National Govt (3 hours)

    PSC    1023                     State and Local Government (3 hours)

                                             Political Science elective (3 hours)

    GEO   1023                      Introduction to Geography (or)

    GEO   2163                      World Geography (3 hours)

                                             Geography elective (3 hours)

    ECO   2013                      Principles of  Macroeconomics (or)

    ECO   2023                      Principles of  Microeconomics (3 hours)

    ANT   2013                       Cultural Anthropology (or)

    SOC   1013                      Introduction to Sociology (3 hours)

    EDU   4913                      (WI) Special Methods: Social Studies (3 hours)

                                             Sub‑Total (45 hours)

The Specialization Requirements - Six hours of electives from each of two of the following:

    World History (0-6 hours)

    United States History  (0-6 hours)

    Political Science (0-6 hours)

    Geography (0-6 hours)

    Sociology (0-6 hours)

    Sub‑Total (12 hours)

Total Combined Major (57 hours)

IMPORTANT:  In addition to the courses for the major listed above, all Educator Preparation candidates must complete the Principles of Learning and Teaching core as outlined in the Secondary Education 7-12 section in the Teachers College section of the catalog. A separate minor is not required for BSE/Social Sciences majors.

Minor Requirements (only for students getting a B.S.E. degree with a major in a field other than social sciences)                       

    ECO   2013                      Principles of Macroeconomics (or)

    ECO   2023                      Principles of Microeconomics (3 hours)

    HIS     1013 or 1263        World Civilization to 1660 (3 hours)

    HIS     1023 or 1043        World Civilization since 1660 (3 hours)

    HIS     2053                      United States to 1877 (3 hours)

    HIS     2063                      United States since 1877 (3 hours)

    HIS (Jr. or Sr. elective)     United States History (3 hours)

    PSC    1013                      American National Government (3 hours)

    GEO   1023                      Introduction to Geography (or)

    GEO   2163                      World Geography (3 hours)

Total Minor Requirements (24 hours)

Students pursuing a BSE/Social Sciences minor should consider taking a three-hour course in Arkansas history as their elective U.S. history course if they plan to teach social studies classes in the Arkansas schools.  Completion of a three-hour college course in Arkansas history is a statutory requirement for the granting of Arkansas social studies teacher licensure.

Major Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degrees

History Major                                                                                                     

    HIS     1013                       World Civilization to 1660 (3 hours)

    HIS     1023 or 1043         World Civilization since 1660 (3 hours)

    HIS     2053                       United States to 1877 (3 hours)

    HIS     2063                       United States since 1877 (3 hours)

    HIS     4803                       Seminar in History (3 hours)

                                              Directed History Electives (18 hours*)

Total Major Requirements (33 hours)

*Students must take at least three upper-level hours in each of the three areas: American, European, and World.

*Students must take at least three hours that are designated WI.

Political Science Major                                                                                     

    PSC    1013 or 1263         American National Government (3 hours)

    PSC    1023                       State and Local Government  (3 hours)

    PSC    2043                       Comparative Government (3 hours)

    PSC    4223                       American Presidency (3 hours)

    PSC    4303                       (WI) Research Methods (3 hours)

                                              Directed Political Science Electives (18 hours*)

Total Major Requirements (33 hours)

*Students must take at least three upper level hours in each of the three subfields of Political Science. It is recommended that all political science majors take PHI 3113, Ethics, during their junior or senior year. 

Public Administration/Public Management Major

Public Administration is the management of the business of the citizens of a nation that is conducted by or receives major regulation from government. This major consists of a combination of courses in political science, business, and English which provide an academic background that is desirable for entry into public service careers in American national, state, or local government.  It also is appropriate for students who plan to go on to graduate or professional schools and pursue post-baccalaureate degrees in public or business administration, political science, or law.  (NOTE:  A separate minor is not required for BA/Public Administration/Public Management majors.)

Liberal Arts Core requirements are as listed elsewhere in this catalog.  All Public Administration/Public Management majors are required to take the three-hour American National Government course that is included in the social sciences section of the Liberal Arts Core.  It is highly recommended, however, that all Public Administration/Public Management majors also take the six hours of United States history courses that are included as well in this section of the Liberal Arts Core (HIS 2053 and HIS 2063). Students interested in majoring in Public Administration/Public Management should contact the Public Administration/Public Management advisor in the Department of Social Sciences for any additional information or advice.

Political Science Component

     PSC    1013 or 1263         American National Government (3 hours)

     PSC    1023                       State and Local Government (3 hours)

     PSC    4053                       American Constitutional Development (or)

     PSC    4173                       Civil Liberties (3 hours)

     PSC    3113                       Legislative Process (3 hours)

     PSC    4063                       Public Administration (3 hours)

     PSC    4123                       Internship (3 hours)

     PSC    4163                       Public Policy (3 hours)

     PSC    4223                       American Presidency (3 hours)

     PSC    4303                       Research Methods (3 hours)

                                               Directed Electives (6 hours)

Total Political Science Requirements (33 hours)

Business Administration Component

     ECO   2013                        Principles of Macroeconomics (3 hours)

     ECO   2023                        Principles of Microeconomics (3 hours)

     BIS     2073                        Fundamentals of Information Systems (or)

     CSC   2003                        Introduction to Computers (3 hours)

     MGM  3113                        Management and Organizational Behavior (3 hours)

     MGM  4023                        Human Resources Management (3 hours)

                                                Directed Electives (3 hours)

Total Business Requirements (18 hours)

 English Requirement

     ENG   3613                         Technical Writing (3 hours)

In lieu of the degree requirement in a foreign language, a student may complete four of the following five courses in financial analysis with a grade of “C” or better:

     ACC   2013, 2023               Principles of Accounting A and B (6 hours)

     MGM  4083                         Public Budgeting and Finance (3 hours)

     FIN     2233                         Beginning Investment (or)

     FIN     3043                         Business Finance (3 hours)

Minor in Public Administration/Public Management

Required Courses 

     MGM  3113                         Management and Organization Behavior (3 hours)

     PSC  3143                          Municipal Government (3 hours)

     PSC  4063                          Public Administration/Public Management (3 hours)

     PSC  4163                          Public Policy (3 hours)

Sub-Total (12 hours)

Electives: Students Choose 6 hours from the following courses:

     PSC  3113                          Legislative Process (3 hours)

     PSC  3213                         Judicial Process (3 hours)

     ENG  3613                         Technical Writing (3 hours)

     PSC  4053/HIS 4283         American Constitutional Development (3 hours)

     PSC  4123                         Internship (3 hours)

     PSC  4173                         Civil Liberties (3 hours)

     PSC  4223                         American Presidency (3 hours)

Total Required for Minor (18 Hours)

Other Minors offered by the Department of Social Sciences

Geography Minor 

     GEO  1023                        Introduction to Geography (3 hours)

                                               Directed Geography Electives (15 hours)

Total Minor Requirements (18 hours)

History Minor

     HIS     1013                       World Civilization to 1660 (3 hours)

     HIS     1023 or 1043         World Civilization since 1660 (3 hours)

     HIS     2053                       United States to 1877 (3 hours)

     HIS     2063                       United States since 1877 (3 hours)

                                               Directed history electives (6 hours)

Total Minor Requirements (18 hours) 

International Studies Minor

Required Courses

     HIS     1023 or 1043        World Civilization since 1660 (3 hours)

     SOC    4063                     World Cultures (3 hours)

     PSC    4093                      International Relations (3 hours)

Elective Courses (Choose any three)

     PSC    4233                      Comparative Politics in the Middle East (3 hours)

     PSC    4243                      Comparative Politics in Africa (3 hours)

     PSC    4253                      South Asian Politics (3 hours)

     PSC    4013                      American Foreign Policy (3 hours)

     PSC    3353                      Contemporary U.S.-Eurasia Interaction (3 hours)

     HIS     3493                      Twentieth Century Europe (3 hours)

     HIS     4623                      Modern German History (3 hours)

     HIS     4653                      Modern Russian History (3 hours)

     HIS     4673                      Asian Civilizations (3 hours)

     HIS     4683                      The Modern Middle East (3 hours)

     HIS     4693                      African History (3 hours)

     MGM  4193                      International Business (3 hours)

     GEO   3153                      Geography of Latin America (3 hours)

     GEO   4043                      Economic Geography (3 hours)

     GEO   3173                      Geography of the Pacific (3 hours)

     GEO   3183                      Geography of Europe (3 hours)

Total Minor Requirements (18 hours)

Political Science Minor

     PSC    1013 or 1263        American National Government (3 hours)

     PSC    1023                     State and Local Government (3 hours)

     PSC    2043                     Comparative Government (3 hours)

                                              Directed Political Science Electives (9 hours)

Total Minor Requirements (18 hours)

Courses in Economics

See listing of courses in the School of Business Administration.

Courses in Geography

The geography courses support requirements specified in the Liberal Arts Core, certain major areas, minors in geography, and elective courses in any school of the university. Although previous study in geography would be helpful to the student, geography offerings are in each case self-contained and require no prerequisites at the undergraduate level. Courses are designed to present the contributions and points of view of geographers in the topic being studied. In doing so, the courses also examine the ways in which people have used and developed the world areas to which the courses relate.

GEO 1023 (GEOG1103). Introduction to Geography. Presents the nature of geographic study; illustrates world conditions, environmental and cultural; introduces map reading; and examines basic concepts.

GEO 2163 (GEOG2103). World Geography. An examination of geographic development on the several continents. Emphasis on cultural features.

GEO 3033. United States and Canada. An examination of the regional structure, its origins, influences on development, and interdependent operation.

GEO 4043, 5043. Economic Geography. Describes the main world economies, considers influences on economic location and locational analysis.

GEO 3153.  Geography of Latin America.  Presents an investigation into the geography of this volatile region with special attention paid to the problems of economic development of Latin America.  Topics include population, industrialization, urbanization, political instability, and environmental change.

GEO 3173. Geography of the Pacific.  A study of the lands, peoples, resources, and contemporary problems of Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific culture areas of Melanesia, Polynesia, and Micronesia.

GEO 3183.  Geography of Europe.  This course is intended as a regional geography of Europe which includes analyses of Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the areas in the former Soviet Union.  Topics for consideration include physical geography, historical development, and political and economic issues confronting the region. 

Courses in American History

HIS 2053 (HIST2113). U.S. to 1877. A survey of the nation's political, economic, social, and military past in the colonial and early national periods through the American Civil War.

HIS 2063 (HIST2123). U.S. since 1877. A survey of the nation's political, economic, social, and military past since the American Civil War.

HIS 3033. (WI) Colonial America. The Spanish, French, Dutch, and English in North America. The origin of the colonial governments. Prerequisite: HIS 2053.

HIS 3073. Early National United States. The development of the United States from 1787 to 1848.  Includes the creation of the Constitution and American political traditions, emergencies of market capitalism, early industrialization, and new attitudes towards race, gender roles, and work.  Prerequisite: HIS 2053.

HIS 3083. (WI) Civil War and Reconstruction. A study of the political, economic, social, constitutional, and military development of the United States from 1848-1877.  Prerequisites: HIS 2053; HIS 2063.

HIS 3133. Emergence of Modern America. The rise of industrialism and big business, the labor movement, and the beginnings of governmental regulations; the Populist movement; the end of the agricultural frontier; and the beginnings of overseas expansion. Prerequisite: HIS 2063.

HIS 3153. (WI) The Rise of American Diversity. This course explores American history from the late nineteenth century to World War II, emphasizing the growing cultural, social and political diversity in that era. Themes to be examined include: Immigration and the political response to it, growing religious diversity and the fading of Protestant dominance, the Great Migration of African Americans to the North, and emergence of new political orders. Prerequisite: HIS 2063.

HIS 3163. The Age of Social Movements. This course explores the history of the Unites States in the late twentieth century, focusing on the emergence of a variety social movements and the ways they influenced American culture and politics. Possible movements to be studies include: the women’s movement, the black freedom movement, the black freedom movement, the Religious Right and the modern conservative movement, the student movement and the New Age movement.  Prerequisite: HIS 2063.

HIS 4213, 5213. (WI) The American West.  A survey of western history from the period before European contact with Indians to the present.  Topics include the interaction between Europeans and Native Americans in western history, views and myths about the west, roles of racial minorities, western political and cultural patterns, and the historiography of the west.

HIS 4233, 5233. American Foreign Policy.  An historical analysis of the development of American foreign relations.  The course is designed to provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles upon which American foreign-policy actions have been based and insight into the various factors that can shape foreign-policy decisions and how they are implemented.  Students are also encouraged to reflect with some seriousness upon the moral and ethical challenges posed by the exercise of power.  Prerequisites:  HIS 2053, HIS 2063 (or) PSC 1013.

HIS 4263, 5263. Arkansas and the Southwest.  Designed especially for those who are preparing to teach Arkansas history. The exploration, settlement, and development of Arkansas from 1541 to the present in relation to the nation and the adjacent areas of Oklahoma, Texas, and Louisiana.

HIS 4283, 5283. American Constitutional Development.  (See PSC 4053, 5053.)

HIS 4293, 5293. The Old South. The political, economic, cultural, and social history of the southern states to the Civil War. Prerequisite: HIS 2053.

HIS 4333, 5333. American Women's History.  Examines the history of American women from the colonial era to the present, focusing on women's political organizations and social activism, economic importance, daily lives, and the ideological construction of gender roles.

HIS 4363. Special Topics in American History.  This elective is designed for the exploration of a selected topic in American History which is not regularly offered in the department’s curriculum. May be repeated with change of content.

HIS 4373, 5373.  The African American Experience. This course explores the African American experience in American history, with particular focus on the ways in which African Americans have confronted the challenge of white supremacy. However, the course rejects the premise that there is a single unitary African American response to at that challenge. Rather, through exploring a number of writings produced by African Americans throughout American history, this course emphasizes the diversity of the African American experience in America. Prerequisite: HIS 2053 and 2063. 

HIS 4713, 5713. Social and Political Thought. (See PSC 4073, 5073.)

Courses in World History

HIS 1013 (HIST1213). World Civilization to 1660. A survey of the civilizations of the world, focusing on the evolution of ideas, politics, and societies to 1660.

HIS 1023 (HIST1223). World Civilization since 1660.  A survey of the major civilizations of the world, focusing on the evolution of ideas, politics, and societies since 1660.

HIS 1043. World Civilization since 1660 Honors.  A survey of the major civilizations of the world, focusing on the evolution of ideas, politics, and societies since 1660.

HIS 3413. Ancient World. The ancient Near East and Rome. A political and cultural history of ancient civilization from its beginning in Egypt and Mesopotamia, through Hellenic and Hellenistic Greece, to the fall of the Western Roman Empire. Prerequisite: HIS 1013.

HIS 4203, 5203.  The New World: Cultural Encounters in Latin America and the Atlantic. This course explores the early history of European colonization of the Americas, emphasizing interchange between Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans from Columbus’s landing to the outbreak of Latin American wars of independence in the nineteenth century. It emphasizes comparative analysis, examining a variety f European and native experiences with particular attention given to Spanish, Portuguese, and French settlements.

HIS 4473.  Special Topics in World History. This elective is designed for the exploration of a selected topic in European or World History which is not regularly offered in the department’s curriculum. May be repeated with change of content. Will count for the World History upper-level requirement when the topic is World History.

HIS 4653, 5653.  Modern Russian History.  This course will examine the political and social history of 18th and 19th century Russia, as a background, and then focus on the 20th century.

HIS 4673. Asian Civilizations. A study of the civilizations of India, China, and Japan and the impact of European civilization upon them.

HIS 4683, 5683.  The Modern Middle East.  This course will provide a bird's eye view of the Ottoman Empire of the 19th century as background, then focus on the Arab world, Turkey, Iran, and Israel of the 20th and 21st centuries.  In the process, such current concerns as nationalism, modernization, Islamic Fundamentalism, and Arab-Israeli disputes will be examined in their historical setting.

HIS 4693, 5693.  African History.  A study of the different civilizations in Africa and the resistance to the imposition of colonial rule on that continent.

Courses in European History

HIS 3463. Renaissance and Reformation. The course is designed to acquaint the student with a double period focusing on the unique cultural and political achievements of the Italian and Northern Renaissance and the profound spiritual revolution of the Protestant reformation. Prerequisite: HIS 1013 or permission of instructor.              

HIS 3483.  Nineteenth Century Europe. An  examination of  the political, economic, military, and social development of   Europe in the age of Industrialism and Nationalism as well as an in-depth study of the origins of the First World War.  Particular stress is laid on the histories of Great Britain, France, Germany, and Russia. Prerequisite: HIS 1023 (or) HIS1043.

HIS 3493. Twentieth Century Europe. A study of Europe from the beginning of World War I to the post-war structure of Europe after World War II. The course focuses on the tragedy of the two world wars, the contest between the dictatorships and democracies of Europe, as well as the continued social, political, and economic growth of the European continent.  Prerequisite: HIS 1023 (or) HIS 1043.

HIS 4003. Women in Europe from the Fall of Rome to the French Revolution. This course examines women’s social and cultural position in medieval and early modern Europe, a period of remarkable cultural continuity punctuate with period of dramatic political and intellectual change. It addresses issues such as women’s participation in political life, the ideas, social norms and laws governing marriage and sexuality, scientific ideas about women and their difference from men, women’s economic roles, their education, and there relationship with the Christian Church. Prerequisite: HIS 1013.

HIS 4443, 5443.  Medieval World. A study of the social, cultural, and economic history of the Middle Ages from the end of the Roman Empire to 1500 with emphasis on European affairs. Prerequisite: HIS 1013.

HIS 4473.  Special Topics in World History. This elective is designed for the exploration of a selected topic in European or World History which is not regularly offered in the department’s curriculum. May be repeated with change of content. Will count for the European History upper-level requirement when the topic is European History.

HIS 4603, 5603. (WI) Tudor and Stuart England. Political, constitutional, social, and economic developments in England, 1485-1689. Prerequisites: HIS 1013.

HIS 4623, 5623. (WI) Modern German History. Survey of German history from Frederick the Great to the post-reunification era. Emphasis is on political, economic, and social developments; Germany in the two world wars; the failure of democracy in the 1920’s; the National Socialist regime; and the division of Germany. Prerequisite: HIS 1023 (or) HIS 1043.

HIS 4643, 5643. French Revolution and Napoleon. The era of revolution and reaction, 1789-1815; its causes and effects. Prerequisites: HIS 1023 (or) HIS 1043.

HIS 4713, 5713.  Social and Political Thought. (See PSC 4073, 5073.)

Seminars

HIS 4803. (WI) Seminar in History.  A seminar designed to introduce students to methods and principles of historical research.  Participants will research and write a seminar paper on a selected topic.  Required of all history (BA) majors.  Prerequisites: HIS 1013, 1023, 2053, and 2063. 

Other History Courses

HIS  3113.  Introduction to Public History. An introduction to the theory and practice of interpreting history for the general public. Topics include types of public history institutions, basic public history interpretation techniques, and skills used by public historians including oral history, archival management, and historic preservation.

HIS 3383.  Writing History. This course is designed to enhance student’s critical, analytical, and writing skills. Students taking this course will develop advanced writing skills especially appropriate for writing about historical subjects. Emphasis will be on developing clear writing using evidence to support arguments. This course will also cover proper documentation in advanced writing (including the use of Chicago Manual of Style). It is open to all majors, but it will particularly interesting and useful to history, art history, and pre-law majors. Does not count toward the History or Social Sciences major or minor. [Can fulfill the junior/senior-level writing course requirement in the Liberal Arts Core.]

HIS 3503, 5503.  History Internship.  An off-campus internship for history majors requiring off-campus work with a government or other agency that incorporates historical research, management of historical archives, or other activities related to the profession of history.  Instructor permission is needed to take this course.  The course may be taken a second time with permission from the department chair.

HIS 4240.  Social Sciences Research.  All BSE/Social Sciences majors must enroll in this course in order to verify that they have completed the research paper requirement for their major: completion of this course is a requirement for graduation in the major.  Students receive a grade of “CR” or “NC,” and the course is a zero credit-hour course.

Courses in Political Science

The political science curriculum is designed to help students understand politics and policy.  Courses are offered in the areas of American politics, public law, public administration, international relations, and comparative government.  Majors select one upper level elective in each of the three subfields.  Courses required for the major do not satisfy the subfield requirement.

Subfield One:  American Government/Public Administration/Public Management

PSC 1013 (PLSC2003). American National Government. The principles, organization, and functioning of the national government of the United States.

PSC 1023 (PLSC2103). State and Local Government. The principles, organization, and functioning of state, county, and township government, with special reference to Arkansas.

PSC 1263.  American National Government – Honors . A critical examination of foundational principles, organization and the process of the national government of the U.S. with special focus on the degree to which it is both responsive and accountable to the needs and demands of a diverse citizenry.

PSC 3033.  Political Parties and Interest Groups.  This course examines political parties across three major divisions – party in the electorate, party as organization, and party in government. The course also addresses the relative strength of the American Party System over time. The second part of the course examines the interest group system in the United States, discussing group formation and proliferation, group impact on policy, and involvement in elections.

PSC 3113. The Legislative Process. A study of the organization, functions, and behavior of state and national legislative bodies in the American political process. Special attention is given to basic problems of leadership, procedures, party, and interest group roles; and law-making by the electorate, the executive, and the courts. Trends of the legislative process here and abroad are also considered. Prerequisites: PSC 1013.

PSC 3143. Municipal Government. An analysis of functions and organizations of municipal governments and of contemporary problems faced by local governments. Prerequisites: PSC 1013.

PSC 3203.  Popular Culture and American Politics.  This course examines the relationship between politics and popular culture. Topics to be addressed include political film, celebrities and politics, pop culture and voting behavior, political socialization and attitudes, television and citizenship, and censorship, among others.  Additionally, this course helps students identify political messages in popular culture and asks the students to think critically about these messages.

PSC 4063, 5063. Public Administration/Public Management. An introductory study of the management of those aspects of the business of the citizens of the United States which are conducted by or receive major regulation from government. Prerequisite: PSC 1013.

PSC 4133, 5133.  Political Behavior.  This course examines the factors that influence the political behavior of the American people.  It analyzes political socialization, political psychology, ideology, group differences, and how those factors affect the performance of democracy.  How opinions are measured, the influence of the news media and variations in the American political culture will also be examined.  Prerequisite:  PSC 1013.

PSC 4163, 5163.  Public Policy.  Introduces students to the policy process: formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.  Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.  Prerequisite:  PSC 1013.

PSC 4223, 5223.  The American Presidency An analysis of the American presidency, including the selection of the president and domestic and foreign policy powers of the office.  Prerequisite: PSC 1013.

Subfield Two:  Comparative Government/International Relations

PSC 2043. Comparative Government. A comparative study of the democratic governments of Great Britain, France, Germany, and Russia. Prerequisite: PSC 1013.

PSC  2193. Global Politics. This is an introductory course in the study of International Relations. The goal of the course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of foreign affairs and to introduce the fundamental principles of global studies within a broad conceptual framework.

PSC 3353.  Contemporary U.S. - Eurasia Interaction. Analysis of prospects for cooperation and conflict between the U.S. and the former Soviet empire on such topics as political and economic affairs, Third World competition, strategic and conventional military issues, as well as the trends of change inside the former U.S.S.R. and East Europe. 

PSC 4093, 5093. International Relations. This course is devoted to questions, issues, and problems that states and their governments have raised as a result of their relations as members of the international community. Prerequisites: PSC 1013.

PSC 4103, 5103. American Foreign Policy. (See HIS 4233, 5233.) An historical analysis of the development of American foreign relations.  The course is designed to provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles upon which American foreign-policy actions have been based and insight into the various factors that can shape foreign-policy decisions and how they are implemented.  Students are also encouraged to reflect with some seriousness upon the moral and ethical challenges posed by the exercise of power.  Prerequisites:  HIS 2053, HIS 2063 (or) PSC 1013.

PSC 4233, 5233.  Comparative Politics in the Middle East. A comparative study of the major nation-states in the Middle East. Prerequisite: PSC 1013.

PSC 4243, 5243. Comparative Politics in Africa. A comparative study of the major nation-states in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Prerequisite: PSC 1013.

PSC 4253.  South Asian Politics.  A study of politics and government in South Asian, focusing on India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka.  Prerequisite: PSC 1013.

Subfield Three:  Political Theory/Methods/Law

PSC 3213, Judicial Process. A study of process and politics in national and state judiciaries. Includes judicial behavior, decisional processes, and impact of American courts. Prerequisite: PSC1013.

PSC 4053, 5053. American Constitutional Development. The American Constitution from its Colonial origins to the present: emphasizes the forces and philosophies that influenced its framing and its subsequent development by formal amendment, statutory elaboration, judicial interpretation, and change in usage. Prerequisite: HIS 2053; HIS 2063 (or) PSC 1013.

PSC 4073, 5073. Social and Political Thought. The development of political and social philosophies with special emphasis   upon    present    conflicts. Prerequisite: nine semester hours in the social sciences, or consent of the instructor.

PSC 4173, 5173. Civil Liberties. A study of leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions on individual liberty and equality, including the social effects of those decisions. Prerequisites: PSC 1013.

PSC 4303. (WI) Research Methods.  Introduces basic elements of research in political science: research design, research problems, measurement, data collection methods, data processing and analysis, index construction, sampling methods, and hypothesis testing.  Required of all political science and public administration majors.  Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

Other Political Science Courses

PSC 4083. Special Topics in Political Science. This is a lecture course combined with class discussions; individual and group presentations; and/or student organized class debates. Grades would be based on exams; class participation and presentation; and a possible term paper. This is an elective in the Political Science major.

PSC 4123. Internship. An off-campus internship for public administration and political science majors involving administrative work with a governmental agency. Open to juniors and seniors only.