Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science

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Faculty: Dr. Carolyn Eoff (Chair), Mr. Jim Harper (Computer Science Coordinator), Mr. Christian-Carpenter, Dr. Coventry, Dr. Durand (Emeritus), Mr. Greene, Dr. Jackson, Ms. Leach, Dr. Lloyd, Ms. Morado, Dr. Moyo, Mr. Schoultz, Dr. Worth, Ms. Wright

Mission Statement

The mission of the Bachelor of Science program in mathematics is to impart the knowledge, practice, and communication of mathematics to our students.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers three programs of study leading to a baccalaureate degree in mathematics: pure mathematics, teacher licensure, and statistics. The Department also offers minors in mathematics and statistics.  Courses in mathematics and statistics are designed to meet the needs and interests of students who plan to teach mathematics in elementary, middle and secondary schools, to give students a strong foundation for graduate study, and to prepare students for employment in business and industry. Mathematics and statistics courses are designed to provide cultural benefits to all students by improving reasoning and problem-solving skills, as well as providing the necessary mathematical foundation for students in business, pre-engineering, and science.  Our programs have been developed using guidelines from the Mathematical Association of America, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and the American Statistical Association.

Candidates for this degree must meet all academic requirements stated in the catalog under which they were admitted to the University, or a later catalog.  In addition to the courses listed below for a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics, all students must complete the Liberal Arts Core requirements as specified by the University. Note that the courses specified below for mathematics and science can be counted as meeting the Liberal Arts Core requirements for courses in their respective areas.  To take any course in mathematics, computer science, or statistics listing a prerequisite, the prerequisite must be passed with a grade of C or better, or the student must have departmental approval. Students must have a grade of C or better in all courses in major and minor fields and also in the courses listed as “additional requirements.”

Pure Mathematics Program of Study

Mathematics Core  

     MTH    1294                 Calculus I (4 hours)

     MTH    2044                 Calculus II (4 hours)

     MTH    2283                 Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)

     MTH    3104                 Calculus III (4 hours)

     MTH    4133                 Algebraic Structures I (3 hours)

     MTH    3163                 Probability and Statistics (3 hours)

     MTH    3113                 Linear Algebra (3 hours)

     MTH    3573                 Transition to Advanced Mathematics (3 hours)

     MTH    4901                 Senior Project (1 hour)

                                          Junior-Senior MTH/STA Electives or STA 2323 (12 hours)

At most three total credit hours of MTH, CSC, or STA internship can be used as electives.

Additional Requirements

     CSC     1104                 Foundations of Computer Science I

     CHM   1014                  University Chemistry I

     PHY    2234                  University Physics I

One of the following: BIO 2104 (General Botany), BIO 2114 (General Zoology), CHM 1024 (University Chemistry II), PHY 2244 (University Physics II)

At most three total credit hours of MTH, CSC, or STA internship can be used as electives.

Teacher Licensure Program of Study

Mathematics Core                                                               

     MTH    1294                 Calculus I (4 hours)

     MTH    2044                 Calculus II (4 hours)

     STA     2323                 Statistical Methods (3 hours)

     MTH    2283                 Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)

     MTH   3023                  Systems of Geometry I (3 hours)

     MTH    3104                 Calculus III (4 hours)

     MTH    3163                 Probability and Statistics I (3 hours)

     MTH    3383                 Math for Secondary Teachers (3 hours)

     MTH    3113                 Linear Algebra (3 hours)

     MTH    3573                Transition to Advanced Mathematics (3 hours)

     MTH    4133                 Algebraic Structures I (3 hours)

     MTH    4893                 Special Methods - Mathematics (3 hours)

     MTH    4901                 Senior Project (1 hour)

Additional Requirements

     CSC     1104                 Foundations of Computer Science I

     Professional Education Curriculum for 7-12 teachers.

     *Students in the 7-12 mathematics teacher licensure program do not have to complete a minor.

Statistics Program of Study                                                              

Mathematics Core

    MTH    1294                 Calculus I (4 hours)

    MTH    2044                 Calculus II (4 hours)

    STA     2323                 Statistical Methods (3 hours)

    MTH    2283                 Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)

    MTH    3104                 Calculus III (4 hours)

    MTH    3113                 Linear Algebra (3 hours)

    MTH    3163                 Probability and Statistics 1 (3 hours)

    MTH    3573                 Transition to Advanced Mathematics (3 hours)

    MTH    4901                 Senior Project (1 hour)

                                         Junior-Senior STA electives (9 hours)

                                         Statistics electives (6 hours)

Statistics electives for this track cannot include courses already required for the core courses in the program of study.  At most three total credit hours of MTH, CSC, or STA internship can be used as electives.

Additional Requirements

    CSC     1104                Foundations of Computer Science I

    CHM   1014                 University Chemistry I

    PHY    2234                 University Physics I

 One of the following: BIO 2104 (General Botany), BIO 2114 (General Zoology), CHM 1024 (University Chemistry II), PHY 2244 (University Physics II)

Statistics Electives

At most one course outside the Mathematics, Computer Science, and Statistics Department can be counted as an elective.

     CSC     1104                 Foundations of Computer Science I (4 hours)

     CSC     1114                 Foundations of Computer Science II (4 hours)

     CSC     2203                 Data Structures (3 hours)

     CSC     3133                 Introduction to Database Theory (3 hours)

     CSC     3223                 Algorithm Analysis (3 hours)

     CSC     4213                 Simulation Theory (3 hours)

     CSC     4261-6              Computer Science Internship (1 - 6 hours)

     GBU    3133                  Business Statistics (3 hours)

     MTH    1294                  Calculus I (4 hours)

     MTH    2044                  Calculus II (4 hours)

     MTH    2283                  Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)

     MTH    3104                  Calculus III (4 hours)

     MTH    3113                  Linear Algebra (WI) (3 hours)

     MTH    3573                  Transition to Advanced Mathematics (3 hours)

     MTH    4123                  Differential Equations (3 hours)

     MTH    4261-6               Mathematics Internship (1 - 6 hours)

     NSG    3603                  Healthcare Research for Evidence-Based Practice (WI) (3 hours)

     PHI      2133                  Logic I (3 hours)

     PHI      4143                  Logic II (3 hours)

     PSY     4343                 Advanced Statistics (3 hours)

     PSY     4433                 Psychological Tests and Measurements (3 hours)

     SOC     4213                Research Methods (3 hours)

     STA     3013                 Applied Regression Analysis (3 hours)

     STA     3163                 Probability and Statistics 1 (3 hours)

     STA     4023                 Applied Analysis of Variance (3 hours)

     STA     4033                 Distribution-Free Statistical Methods (3 hours)

     STA     4043                 Statistical Analysis of Time Series (3 hours)

     STA     4261-6             Statistics Internship (1 - 6 hours)

     STA     4433                 Probability and Statistics II (3 hours)

Statistics Minor - 18 Hours (minimum)

The minor in statistics requires STA2323 (Statistical Methods) and 15 more hours from the list of Statistics Electives.  Students in the pure mathematics track can minor in statistics, but no elective can apply to both the major and the minor.  At least two three of the electives must have a STA prefix. At most three total credit hours of MTH, CSC, or STA internship can be used as electives.

Mathematics Minor - 18 Hours (minimum)

The minor in mathematics requires 18 hours of MTH or STA courses at or above Calculus I (MTH 1294).  At least one three credit MTH or STA course at the junior or senior level is required.  Mathematics courses specifically designed for elementary or middle-level education will not be counted towards a minor in mathematics.  At most three total credit hours of MTH, CSC, or STA internship can be used as electives.

Middle School Mathematics Program

The program and degree for Middle Level Math/Science Licensure are through Teachers College, Henderson.  However, the following mathematics courses required for this program are taught in the Department of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Statistics.

     MTH 1053           Number Operations & Number Sense

     MTH 1213           Algebra for Elementary & Middle Grades

     MTH 2483           Geometry 1 for Elementary & Middle Grades

     MTH 2543           Data Analysis, Statistics and Probability for the Elementary and Middle Grades

     MTH 3633           Advanced Mathematics for Middle Grades

     MTH 3553           Foundations of Calculus for Middle Grades

     MTH 4563           Math Modeling and Applications for Middle Grades

Courses in Mathematics

MTH 0003.  Elementary Algebra. This course is designed for students who desire or need a stronger understanding of the numeration system and how to operate within that system.  It is designed to enhance students’ understanding of algebraic expressions and equations.  Students will analyze functions using graphical and algebraic techniques.  Students with a mathematics ACT score below 17 (or equivalent score from admission exams approved by HSU) are required to complete the course with a grade of C or better before enrolling in MTH 0013.  This course cannot be used for degree requirements.

MTH 0013. Intermediate Algebra. This course is designed to strengthen basic algebraic manipulation skills. The course develops the characteristics of linear and quadratic functions to solve equations, systems of equations and inequalities. Prerequisite: MTH 0003 (with a grade of C or better), or a mathematics ACT score of at least 17 (or equivalent score from an admission exam approved by HSU). This course cannot be used for degree requirements.

MTH 1033 (MATH 1003).  Mathematics for Liberal Arts. A course designed to meet the general education needs of students majoring in programs that do not require college algebra or more advanced courses. This course consists of units dealing with logic, proportional reasoning, the mathematics of finance, exponential growth and decay, geometry (plane and solid), voting theory, applications of mathematics to music and art, and probability and statistics. Prerequisite: MTH 0003 (with a grade of C or better), or a mathematics ACT score of at least 19 (or equivalent score from an admission exam approved by HSU).

MTH 1053. Number Operations and Number Sense. This is the entry level course for P-8 education majors. Numeration systems from natural numbers through real numbers will be covered. The operations and properties with applications within each system will be developed as appropriate to the P-8 teacher. Prerequisite: MTH 0013 (with a grade of C or better), or a mathematics ACT score of at least 19 (or equivalent math score from an admission exam approved by HSU).

MTH 1083 (MATH 1003). Mathematics through Practical Applications. This is a course designed to meet the general education needs of students majoring in programs that do not require college algebra or more advanced courses. Topics include percentages, calculating and using statistics, unit conversions, mathematical modeling, physics of motion, probability, geometry, estimation, data collection and other applications to everyday life. Examples will come from various areas chosen by the instructor such as sports, music, art, physics, acoustics, etc. Prerequisite: MTH 0003 (with a grade of C or better), or a mathematics ACT score of at least 19 (or equivalent score from an admission exam approved by HSU).

MTH 1213.  Algebra for Elementary and Middle Grades.  A course designed to meet the needs of students preparing for elementary and/or middle school licensure.  Topics include: linear and non-linear equations, linear inequalities; inverse, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions.  Concepts will be developed using appropriate manipulatives and technology.  Prerequisite:  MTH 0013 (with a grade of C or better), or a mathematics ACT score of at least 19 (or equivalent math score from an admission exam approved by HSU).  An ACT math score of 22 or above is recommended.

MTH 1243 (MATH 1103).  College Algebra.  A course designed to meet the general education needs of students in business, sciences, and other programs outside of mathematics. Topics include: linear, non-linear, inverse, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations, linear and quadratic inequalities.  Problem-solving techniques will be discussed with and without the use of technology.  Prerequisite:  MTH 0013 (with a grade of C or better), or a mathematics ACT score of at least 20 (or equivalent math score from an admission exam approved by HSU).  An ACT math score of 22 or above is recommended.

MTH 1253 (MATH 1203).  Plane Trigonometry. Topics to include angular measurement, trigonometric functions, identities, graphing, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, Heron’s formula, polar coordinates, complex numbers, vectors, and parametric equations.  Prerequisite or co-requisite: MTH 1243 or MTH 1273.

MTH 1273. Precalculus Mathematics. This course is designed to prepare students for MTH 1294. Course includes a study of linear and non-linear equations, systems of equations, and inequalities, an introduction to matrices, sequences and series, as well as conics. Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra. An ACT mathematics score of 25 or above is recommended.

MTH 1294 (MATH 2405). Calculus I. Topics include limits, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions. Theory, computation and applications are emphasized. Prerequisites: MTH 1253, MTH 1273; or consent of the department.

MTH  2611, 2612, 2613, 2614, 2615, 2616.  Internship in Mathematics. See MTH 4621.

MTH 2044. Calculus II (MATH 2505).  This course is a continuation of MTH 1294-Calculus I. Additional topics will include integration techniques, improper integrals, infinite series, parametric equations and polar coordinates. Theory, computation, and applications are emphasized.  Prerequisite: MTH 1294 or consent of the department.

MTH 2283. Discrete Mathematics.  A study of mathematical structures that are fundamentally discrete rather than continuous in nature. The course includes a study of logic, mathematical writing and proofs, an introduction to set theory, relations, and counting methods. Prerequisites: MTH 1243 or MTH 1273; MTH 1294 recommended.

MTH 2483. Geometry I for the Elementary and Middle Grades. Geometry concepts appropriate for P-8 grade levels will be developed. Topics will include appropriate geometric terminology, lines, angles, plane curves, polygons and other plane regions, polyhedra and other space figures, measure, constructions, transformations, congruence, similarity and geometric reasoning. Prerequisite: MTH 1053 with a C or better and either MTH 1213 or MTH 1243 with a C or better.

MTH 2543. Data Analysis, Statistics and Probability for the Elementary and Middle Grades. Concepts of data analysis, statistics and probability appropriate for P-8 grade levels will be developed. Topics to be included are: univariate and bivariate graphical techniques, measures of center and dispersion, normal distribution, discrete probability with applications, geometric probability with applications, and simulation. Prerequisites: MTH 1053 with a C or better and either MTH 1213 or MTH 1243 with a C or better.

MTH 3023. (WI) Systems of Geometry I. The course introduces the concept of an axiomatic mathematical system through the development of neutral and Euclidean geometries with an emphasis on valid arguments. Non-Euclidean geometry will also be investigated. Prerequisites: MTH 1294 and MTH 2283.

MTH 3063. Advanced Algebra for the Elementary and Middle Grades. The course reviews the basic concepts of algebra, use of manipulatives, and the use of technology. Prerequisite: MTH 2483.

MTH 3073. Geometry II for the Middle Grades (4-8). An informal study of the concepts of position, shape, size, construction with straightedge and compass, structure of geometry, and measurement. Prerequisite: MTH 2483.

MTH 3093, 5093.  Systems of Geometry II.  Continuation of MTH 3023. Includes non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite: MTH 3023.

MTH 3104. Calculus III.  The course examines calculus in 2 and 3 dimensions.  Topics include: vectors, vector functions, partial differentiation, multiple integration, Lagrange multipliers, and vector calculus.  Prerequisite: MTH 2044.

MTH 3113. (WI) Linear Algebra. Topics include: vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, sets of linear transformations and matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of linear transformations, and similar matrices. Prerequisites: MTH 1294 and MTH 2283.  MTH 3573 is recommended.

MTH 3163. Probability and Statistics I.  The course deals with the mathematical theory of probability and application of this theory to statistical inference.  Topics include descriptive statistics, independence, conditional probability, expectation, variance, discrete and continuous distributions, moment generating functions, and the central limit theorem. Prerequisites: MTH 2283 and MTH 2044.

MTH 3383. Mathematics for Secondary Teachers. This course develops problem-solving strategies and proofs in a variety of mathematical contexts, emphasizing the connections between algebra and geometry.  The historical development of mathematics and how it affects mathematics today will be explored.  Prerequisites: MTH 1243 or MTH 1273, MTH 1253, MTH 2283.

MTH 3553. Mathematics of Calculus and Technology for the Middle Grades. An intuitive understanding of limits, derivatives with applications, and integration with applications, as appropriate for middle level mathematics teachers. Appropriate use of technology will be incorporated. Prerequisite: MTH 2483.

MTH 3573.  Transition to Advanced Mathematics.  A rigorous study of fundamental concepts of higher order mathematics, including set theory, logic, equivalence relations, and functions.  Written and oral communications of mathematics with precision and rigor will be emphasized, particularly writing proofs.  Prerequisites: MTH 1294, MTH 2283.

MTH 3633.  Advanced Mathematics for Middle Grades. Please provide description and placement. A course designed to meet the needs of students preparing for middle school licensure. At the completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate their understanding of the basic concepts of advanced mathematics by representing, describing, interpreting, modeling, and generalizing mathematical phenomena. Technology and tools will be used appropriately.
Prerequisite: MTH1213 or MTH1243. 


MTH 4123, 5123. Differential Equations. Analytic, approximate, and graphical solutions to ordinary differential equations, the theory of the existence and uniqueness of solutions, systems of linear and nonlinear ODE’S, and applications of these ideas to the physical sciences. Prerequisite: MTH 20452044.

MTH 4133, 5133. (WI) Algebraic Structures I. An introduction to the fundamental algebraic structures: groups, rings and fields. Emphasis is placed on developing mathematical sophistication and rigor of proof. Prerequisite: MTH 2283, MTH 1294 and MTH 3573.

MTH 4143, 5143. Structures II.  Continuation of MTH 4133; advanced group theory and Galois theory. Prerequisite: MTH 4133.

MTH 4153, 5153. History of Mathematics. This course is an overview of the development of elementary mathematics from primitive counting to modern accomplishments in algebra, geometry, and calculus.  Prerequisite: MTH 2044.

MTH 4223, 5223. Introduction to Topology. An introduction to topological spaces, homeomorphism, compactness, separations, and connectedness. Prerequisite: MTH 4133.

MTH 4233, 5233. Advanced Calculus I. A rigorous development of calculus of one and of several variables. Topics include sequences, series, continuous and differentiable functions, integration theory, and series of functions. Prerequisites: MTH 2044, 4133.

MTH 4303, 5303. Advanced Calculus II. Continuation of MTH 4233. Prerequisite: MTH 4233.

MTH 4331-3, 5331-3. Independent Study. Independent study in an area of mathematics selected by the student and faculty advisor. Credit will vary from one (1) to three (3) hours. May be repeated.  Prerequisite: consent of faculty advisor.

MTH 4373, 5373. Numerical Analysis. An introduction to numerical methods of problem solving to include error analysis, approximate solutions to equations of one variable, interpolation and polynomial approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solutions of  differential equations, linear systems, and approximation of functions. Prerequisites: MTH 2044  and CSC 1104.

MTH 4433, 5433. Probability and Statistics II. The mathematical theory of probability and application of this theory to statistical inference. Topics include multivariable distributions, confidence intervals, tests of statistical hypotheses, linear models, 1-way analysis of variance, and quality control through statistical methods. Prerequisite: MTH 3163.

MTH 4473, 5473. Simulation Theory.  See CSC 4213.

MTH 4491-3, 5491-3. Special Topics in Mathematics Education. A broad range of topics in mathematics content that will include, but not be limited to, algebra, geometry, probability, statistics and data representation, and the use of technology. Topics will be addressed to middle school and/or high school teachers. Students will be able to repeat the course for credit when different topics are being presented than when the student previously took the class. A designation of the topics covered will be recorded on the transcript. Prerequisites: Secondary - MTH 1243, MTH 1295, or consent of the instructor. Middle School - MTH 1053, MTH 2483 or departmental consent.

MTH 4563. Math Modeling and Applications for the Middle Grades. This course will serve as the capstone course for students pursuing licensure in Middle School Mathematics and Science. Connections between other mathematics courses in the program will be broadened and explored using appropriate materials through laboratory experiences. The use of technology, including the Internet as an instructional source, as is appropriate for the middle grades will be incorporated to enhance problem solving, communication and reasoning skills. Prerequisite: MTH 3553 or departmental consent.

MTH 4621, 4612, 4613, 4614, 4615, 4616. Internship in Mathematics. The professional internship is intended to provide a learning opportunity for students to: 1) apply knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom in a professional context; 2) understand which skills are transferable to new contexts; 3) identify and understand the practices and protocols of the industry in which they are working; and 4) refine and reassess their own career goals as a result of the experience. Current employment may not be used for credit in this course. This is a credit/no credit course and may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of Department.

MTH 4893. (WI)  Special Methods/Math. This course emphasizes the strategies of teaching mathematics, the planning for teaching mathematics, and mathematical assessment programs.  Topics include developing objectives, creating lessons, building units, designing an assessment plan, and appropriate use of manipulatives and technology.  Prerequisite: MTH 3383 or departmental consent.

MTH  4901.  Senior Project. Completion of research paper on a topic consistent with student’s degree track. Each student will work with a primary faculty mentor as well as a second reader; the paper will follow established departmental guidelines. This project will be completed during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. Students will be required to present their papers in a departmental colloquium. Students will take the Major Field Test (Mathematics) as part of the grade for this course. Prerequisites: Senior Standing and departmental approval.

MTH 4961-3, 5961-3. Special Topics in Mathematics. Topics selected from the areas of analysis, algebra, geometry, topology, logic, statistics, or other areas according to student needs and the instructor’s specialization. The student’s transcript will indicate the specific topic covered. Because course content will vary, students may repeat the course for a maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite: Departmental consent.

Courses in Statistics

STA 2611, 2612, 2613, 2614, 2615, 2616. Internship in Statistics. See MTH 4621.

STA 4621, 4622, 4623, 4624, 4625, 4626.  Internship in Statistics. See MTH 4621.

STA 2323. Statistical Methods. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, introduction to probability, basic probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing. Prerequisites:  MTH 1243 or MTH 1273.

STA 4013.  Applied Regression Analysis.  Topics include simple linear regression, assessing conditions, inference, variable transformations, multiple linear regression, choosing optimal predictors, identifying unusual points, associated special topics, logistic regression. Prerequisite: STA 2323 and departmental permission.

STA 4023.  Applied Analysis of Variance.  One-way ANOVA, two-way additive ANOVA, two-way ANOVA with interaction, analysis of covariance, Levene’s Test for homogeneity, ad hoc procedures, Kruskall Wallis Test, Randomized F test, and an introduction to experimental design. Prerequisite: STA 2323 and departmental permission.

STA 4033.  Distribution-Free Statistical Methods.  Topics include comparison of classical and distribution-free tests of hypotheses, test assumptions, efficiency and related characteristics, Fisher’s method of randomization, ranking tests, tests based on the binomial distribution.  Prerequisite: STA 2323 and departmental permission.

STA 3163.  Probability and Statistics I.  See MTH 3163.

STA 4043. Statistical Analysis of Time Series.  Topics include time series components, descriptive smoothing methods, regression models for time series data, forecasting via exponential smoothing, evaluation of forecasts, autocorrelation, ARIMA models and Box-Jenkins methods, combining forecasts, frequency domain analysis, filtering. Prerequisite: STA 3013 and departmental permission.

STA 4433.   Probability and Statistics II.  See MTH 4433.

Computer Science

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers programs of study leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in computer science and a minor in computer science.  The program is based upon guidelines as specified in the latest report by The Joint Task Force on Computing Curricula of the IEEE Computer Society and The Association for Computing Machinery.  The department regularly reviews and adapts the program to ensure that it continues to satisfy these guidelines, but also meets the needs of the students and the organizations of which they will be part. By staying abreast of changes in the industry, the faculty is able to incorporate new technologies and ideas into the program and to provide students with a solid foundation on which they can build during their careers. Throughout the program, the theoretical concepts of computer science as well as the practical issues of implementation are stressed. Emphasis is placed on the "complete" problem-solving process.

The mission of the computer science program is to provide its majors with the expertise to become leaders and innovators in information technology and to produce graduates that will be successful professionals, be committed to lifelong learning, and make positive contributions to society.

Successful computer science graduates find themselves faced with a variety of career paths.  These include application/system programmers, systems analysts, software engineers, database management administrators, and network administrators to name a few.  Students receive a solid foundation preparing them for these choices through the computer science core courses.  This core consists of courses in programming concepts, data structures, algorithms, software engineering, database management systems, architecture, operating systems, formal languages and programming languages.

A student’s knowledge of the computing discipline is also supplemented with additional elective course work.  This can include courses in communication and networking, interfacing and machine control, machine intelligence, visual programming, graphics, electronics, compiler theory, and client/server programming among others.  Other requirements for the degree include a number of mathematics and science courses as well as the liberal arts core.  Additional hours are also required in the areas of written and verbal communication.  Collectively, these courses provide a computer science graduate with the necessary foundation to either enter the job market or pursue an advanced degree.

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science

To obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in computer science students must complete at least 120 semester hours of college-level academic work.  Students who enter the program adequately prepared can complete degree requirements over the course of eight semesters.  Others, however, may require additional time.  This is usually the case for students needing preparatory courses or for those taking course loads lighter than that listed here.  Consultation with academic advisors assists students in preparing a plan of study that will enable the student to obtain the degree within the confines of the academic requirements as well as their own personal objectives.

In addition to the courses listed below for a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science, all students must complete the Liberal Arts Core requirements as specified by the University.  Note that the courses specified below for mathematics and science can be counted as meeting the Liberal Arts Core requirements for courses in their respective areas

Computer Science Core

         CSC          1104                 Foundations of Computer Science I (4 hours)

         CSC          1114                 Foundations of Computer Science II (4 hours)

         CSC          2173                 Assembler Language (3 hours)

         CSC          2203                 Data Structures (3 hours)

         CSC          3223                 Algorithm Analysis (3 hours)

         CSC          3443                 Computer Organization (3 hours)

         CSC          3453                 Programming Languages (3 hours)

         CSC          3193                 Operating Systems (3 hours)

         CSC          3133                 Database Theory (3 hours)

         CSC          3463                 Software Engineering (3 hours)

         CSC          3433                 Computational Complexity (3 hours)

         CSC          3472                 (WI) Technology and Society (2 hours)

         CSC          4483                 Capstone (3 hours)

Computer Science Electives

                                                    Jr/Sr Computer Science Courses (9 hours)

Mathematics

         MTH        2283                 Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)

         MTH        1294                 Calculus I (4 hours)

         MTH        2044                 Calculus II (4 hours)

         STA         2323                 Statistical Methods* (3 hours)

                                                   Jr/Sr Mathematics (3 hours)

*May substitute MTH 3163 – Probability and Statistics I

Science (8 hours)                                                                                                                                        

        CHM        1014/1024        University Chemistry I/II or

        PHY         2034/2044        General Physics I/II or

        PHY         2234/2244        University Physics I/II

Other

        ENG         3613                 Technical Writing (3 hours)

        COM        3813                 Business and Professional Communication (3 hours)

Minor in Computer Science

In addition to the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree, the Department also offers a minor in computer science.  The minor is structured to provide the student with a basic foundation of computer programming and supplies exposure to more advanced computing concepts through elective courses.  Students seeking a minor in computer science are encouraged to consult with the academic advisors in the Department to customize the program to satisfy their needs.

Computer Science Core

         CSC          1104                 Foundations of Computer Science I (4 hours)

         CSC          1114                 Foundations of Computer Science II (4 hours)

         CSC          2203                 Data Structures (3 hours)

Computer Science Electives             

         Jr/Sr Computer Science  (6 hours)

Mathematics

         MTH          2283                 Discrete Mathematics (3 hours)

Courses in Computer Science

CSC 1104. Foundations of Computer Science I.  A study of programming, concepts and techniques. Topics included are: binary representation of numbers and characters, data types of constants and variables, arithmetic expressions and the hierarchy of arithmetic operations, assignment statements, logical expressions, branching, loops, arrays, sub-programs, input/output, linear and binary searches, and basic sorts. Programming style is introduced through pseudocode.  Meets for three-hours lecture and two-hours laboratory each week.  Prerequisite: MTH 0013 – Intermediate Algebra, with a grade of C or better; or required math test score.  An ACT math score of 21 or above is recommended.

CSC 1114.  Foundations of Computer Science II.  A continuation of Foundations of Computer Science I. Good programming style is stressed. Topics included are: documentation of programs, step-wise refinement, structuring programs, top-down design of programs, internal sorts, and linear data structures.  Meets for three-hours lecture and two-hours laboratory each week.  Prerequisite: CSC 1104 – Foundations of Computer Science I.

CSC 2003 (CPSI1003).  Introduction to Computers. A computer literacy course introducing the novice to the use of the computer. Topics included are: problems having practical computer solutions, available software, computer terminology. Examples from business, education, political science and the social sciences are included. This does not count toward a computer science major or minor.

CSC 2163.  Computer Applications.  A theoretical and practical study of current computer application software. Applications covered will vary by semester. May be repeated with change in content.  This does not count toward a computer science major or minor.

CSC 2173.  Assembler Language.  A study of the basic concepts of computer systems and an introduction to an assembler language. Topics included are: computer structure and machine language, assembler language, addressing techniques, macros, and I/O routines. Prerequisite: CSC 1104 – Foundations of Computer Science I.

CSC 2203.  Data Structures.  The objective of this course is to apply analysis and design techniques to non-numeric algorithms that act on data structures. Topics will include linked lists, queues, stacks, trees, AVL trees, and string handling algorithms. Prerequisite: CSC 1114 – Foundations of Computer Science II.

CSC 2611/6.  Internship in Computer Science.  The professional internship is intended to provide a learning opportunity for beginning students to: 1) apply knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom in a professional context; 2) understand which skills are transferable to new contexts; 3) identify and understand the practices and protocols of the industry in which they are working; and 4) refine and reassess their own career goals as a result of the experience. Current employment may not be used for credit in this course. This is a credit/no credit course and may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.  Prerequisite: Consent of Department.

CSC 3133.  Introduction to Database Theory.  An introduction to database management systems.  Topics covered include:  structures, indexing, E-R model, relational model, relational algebra and calculus, query languages, SQL, constraints and normalizations, transaction management, integrity and security issues.  Prerequisite:  CSC 2203 – Data Structures.

CSC 3144. Digital Electronics.  Topics covered include binary and hex arithmetic, boolean algebra, logic gates, transistors and diodes, logic families, flip-flops, counters, power supplies, comparators, A-D, D-A converters, digital instruments. Meets for three lecture periods and a two-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: PHY 2234 – University Physics I and PHY 2244 – University Physics II.

CSC 3153. Introduction to Compiler Theory. An introduction to the formal study of languages and compiler construction: Topics included are: programming language basics, finite automata and lexical analysis, grammars, top-down and bottom-up parsers, syntax-directed translation, code generation, and code optimization. Prerequisite: CSC 2173 – Assembler Language and CSC 3433 – Computational Complexity.

CSC 3193. Operating Systems.  A study of the principles of operating systems and the interrelationships between operating systems and computer architecture. Topics included are: system structure, memory management, process management, and recovery procedures. Prerequisite: CSC 3443 – Computer Organization.

CSC 3223. Algorithm Analysis.  An introduction to the analysis and design of algorithms, and to techniques for measuring their complexity. Prerequisites: CSC 2203 – Data Structures and MTH 1295 – Calculus I or consent of Department.

CSC 3433.  Computational Complexity.  A study of basic theoretical computer science concepts.  Topics will include formal language theory and results, non-determinism, grammars, Turing machines, halting problem, and undecidability among others. Prerequisite:  CSC 3223 – Algorithm Analysis.

CSC 3443.  Computer Organization.  An introductory course in computer organization and architecture.  Topics included are:  machine level representation of data, memory system organization and architecture, I/O fundamentals, buses, pipelining, multiprocessing, and system performance enhancements. Prerequisite:  CSC 2173 – Assembler Language.

CSC 3453.  Programming Languages.  Comparison of the organization and structure of procedural, object-oriented, functional, declarative, and scripting languages.  Additional topics will include language translation, abstraction mechanisms, language design and semantics. Prerequisite:  CSC 2203 – Data Structures.

CSC 3463.  Software Engineering.  A study of the methods used in the design, development, implementation, testing and maintenance of software systems.  Students will utilize the team approach in the development and management of software projects and will make use of modern tools to achieve these tasks. Prerequisite:  CSC 3223 – Algorithm Analysis.

CSC 3472.  (WI) Technology and Society.  A course that allows the student to explore and develop an understanding of the social and professional context in which computing is done.  Topics included are:  computing history, professional responsibilities, risks and liabilities, intellectual property, privacy, computer crime, and economic issues. Prerequisite:  CSC 3463 – Software Engineering.

CSC 4184.  Interfacing and Machine Control.  A study of hardware interfacing components and techniques.  Topics covered include: embedded controllers, communication controllers, PCBs, embedded logic, debugging strategies, interrupts, multitasking, and networking.  Prerequisite:  CSC 3443 – Computer Organization.

CSC 4213.  Simulation Theory.  A study of the fundamental principles involved in the construction of computer simulation models. Topics included are: random number generators, model construction, queuing models, and inventory models. Prerequisite: STA 2323 – Statistical Methods or MTH 3163 – Probability and Statistics I, and CSC 1114 – Foundations of Computer Science II or consent of department.

CSC 4263. Client/Server Programming.  A study of the principles governing client/server programming. Topics included are: client/server model, concurrency, protocols and interfaces, issues in software design, connectionless vs. connection-oriented servers, iterative vs. concurrent servers, RPCs, and selected case studies. Prerequisite: CSC 2203 – Data Structures.

CSC 4273. Introduction to Data Communication.  A study of the fundamental principles involved in data communication and a general overview of various data communication systems. Topics included are baud rates, modem controls, protocols, error detection and correction, communication line characteristics, synchronous and asynchronous communication, application interface software, network systems, analysis of communication systems. Prerequisite: CSC 3443 – Computer Organization.

CSC 4283. Introduction to Networking.  A study of Local Area Network Standards and an implementation of a LAN. Topics covered are: LAN topologies, transmission media, access methods, OSI layer implementations, NOS installation, management, print servers, network management software. Prerequisites: CSC 3443 – Computer Organization or consent of Department.

CSC 4293. Numerical Analysis.  An introduction to numerical methods of problem solving to include error analysis, interpolation procedures, differentiation, integration, solutions of non-linear and differential equations, and approximation of functions. Prerequisites: MTH 2045 – Calculus II and CSC 1104 – Foundations of Computer Science I.

CSC 4331-3.  Independent Study.  Independent study in an area of computer science selected by the student and faculty advisor. Credit will vary from one to three hours. May be repeated. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

CSC 4421-3.  Special Topics in Computer Science.  Variable content course covering current and advanced topics in computer science. May be repeated with change in content. Prerequisite: consent of Department.

CSC 4483.  Computer Science Capstone.  A project course requiring the computer science student to develop and implement a capstone project requiring the integration of software, hardware components, and human factors.  Software engineering methodologies along with good written and verbal communications skills will be required.  Program assessment tools will be administered. Prerequisites:  CSC 3463 – Software Engineering, CSC 3113 – Database Theory, and CSC 3193 – Operating Systems.

CSC 4493.  Artificial Intelligence.  An introduction to machine intelligence.  Topics covered include:  AI languages, problem solving strategies, searching, knowledge representations, natural language processing, machine learning, expert systems, neural networks, and robotics. Prerequisite:  CSC 3223 – Algorithm Analysis.

CSC 4503.  Computer Graphics.  A course that provides an introduction to basic 3D computer graphics programming techniques.  Topics included are:  OpenGL library, user interface design, projection and transformations, basic animation, etc. Prerequisite:  CSC 3223 – Algorithm Analysis.

CSC 4513.  Visual Programming.  An introduction to visual programming.  Topics covered include:  interface design, object oriented concepts, Internet programming, data reporting, error handling, help file creation, linkages, etc. Prerequisite:  CSC 3223 – Algorithm Analysis.

CSC 4621/6.  Internship in Computer Science.  The professional internship is intended to provide a learning opportunity for advanced students to: 1) apply knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom in a professional context; 2) understand which skills are transferable to new contexts; 3) identify and understand the practices and protocols of the industry in which they are working; and 4) refine and reassess their own career goals as a result of the experience. Current employment may not be used for credit in this course. This is a credit/no credit course and may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.  Prerequisite: Consent of Department.