Arkansas Undergraduate Research Conference

The 24th annual Arkansas Undergraduate Research Conference will be held on the campus of Henderson State University on April 14-15, 2017. The AURC is for undergraduate students only and is open to all disciplines. Abstracts may be submitted for oral presentations and or poster presentations. Abstracts will be accepted through April 1, 2017.  

Registration is now open .

Submit an abstract for the AURC.

AURC

 

Schedule and Table of Contents

Friday April 14, 2017

Registration & Check-In                                                                                  1:30-5:00 pm

Reynolds Science Center Lobby

Oral Presentations                                                                    3:00 pm

Friday Oral Presentation Schedule

Session

     Title

Location

 Page

 

 

 

 

1

Basic and Applied Sciences Part 1 

Reynolds 322

6

 

2

Social Sciences and Humanities

Reynolds 303

7

 

 

 

 

Interdisciplinary Poster Session                                           5:00 pm

Garrison 1st  Floor,  Grand Ballroom          List of titles Pg 8-10

 

Banquet and Keynote Address                                             6:15 pm

Dr. Wycliffe W. Njororai Simiyu – The University of Texas at Tyler

“Career and Life benefits of undergraduate research experiences”

Garrison Center Grand Ballroom

Schedule and Table of Contents

Saturday April 15, 2017

Registration, Check-in                                                    7:30-10:00 am

and Continental Breakfast

Reynolds Science Center Lobby

 

Oral Presentations                                                                    8:30 am

Saturday Oral Sessions

 

Session

Title

Location

Page

 

 

 

 

4

Basic and Applied Sciences Part 2

Reynolds 322

11

 

 

 

Keynote Address
 
Introduction by Dr. Lewis Kanyiba, Assistant Professor of Physical Education
Dr. Wycliffe W. Njororai Simiyu
 Associate Professor of Health and Kinesiology, The University of Texas at Tyler
 
“Career and Life benefits of undergraduate research experience”
keynote speaker 2017

 

Profile:   WYCLIFFE W. NJORORAI SIMIYU, was born, raised and educated in Kenya. Kenya is on the Eastern side of the African Continent. He graduated with a Ph.D. from Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya in 2001 specializing in Physical Education and Sport.  Prior to the Ph.D., he had graduated with a Bachelors and Masters in the same fields in 1985 and 1992 respectively from the same Institution. He taught at high school, community college and university levels in Kenya from 1985 to 2007, before transitioning to Wiley College, Texas, USA (2007-2012) and later at the University of Texas at Tyler since 2012. He also served as Athletics Director (2001 to 2004) and Chair of the Department of Exercise, Recreation and Sport Science (2004 to 2007) at Kenyatta University. He served as the Lead Professor of Physical Education at Wiley College (2007 to 2012) and Interim Chair of the Department of Health and Kinesiology at UT at Tyler in spring 2013. He is an exemplary teacher. He has earned exemplary teaching and service awards in Kenya and in the US. He has published in peer review journals and presented at conferences widely on various aspects of the discipline of Kinesiology. Most importantly, he has mentored many students, both in East Africa and USA that have progressed to become outstanding scholars around the globe.

In his spare time, he enjoys running, watching competitive Athletics, writing and reading especially sports literature, leadership, motivation and Christian inspirational writings. He is married to Dr. Fletcher Njororai of UT at Tyler for the past 31 years. They have two daughters and a son, and two grandsons.  Interestingly, the first and last-born children are all Kinesiology majors!

He considers himself a dynamic, sensitive, experienced professional leader and student-centered educator. His ultimate goal is to facilitate students to discover their ultimate mission in life and to inspire them to aspire towards successful professional careers.

 Friday Oral Sessions Begin at 3:00 pm

Session 1   Basic and Applied Sciences Part 1                 Reynolds 322

Chairperson:      TBD, Henderson State University                                                         

3:00        Fully Autonomous Mars Rover

Alex Cutsinger and Kevin Lewelling, Ph.D.

University of Arkansas – Fort Smith

3:20        Liriope and Ophiopogon: overview of two genera of Ruscaceae naturalized in the Arkansas flora

Megan Stone, Brook Olson, Keenan Serviss, James Peck, Cynthia Fuller, Ph.D., and James Engman, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

3:40        Synthesis and analysis of tautomerically ambiguous cytosine-based analogs to induce viral mutagenesis

Carlie M. Clem and Vincent K. Dunlap, Ph.D. 

Henderson State University

Break 4:00 – 4:10

4:10        Investigation on feature detection and description for on-device mobile landmark recognition

Yida Xu, Yancheng Li, Kaiman Zeng, Ph.D., and Nansong Wu, Ph.D. 

Henderson State University

4:30        New and Noteworthy Vascular Plant Records from Arkansas

Brook Olson, Megan Stone, Keenan Serviss, James Peck, and Brett Serviss, Ph.D. 

Henderson State University

4:50        Math Anxiety and Cortisol as a Biomarker

M. Allie Davis and T. David Bateman, Ph.D. 

Henderson State University

Friday Oral Sessions Begin at 3:00 pm

Session 2    Social Sciences and Humanities                          Reynolds 303     

Chairperson:      TBD, Henderson State University

3:00     The Dark Side of Altruism

Brian G. Lott and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

3:20        Mind-Body:  Cloud Atlas

Darian Sisson and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

3:40        Atomic Robo: Artificial Intelligence and Decision-Making

Dax W. Guilliams and ­Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

4:00        Dracula and the Art of War

 

Cameron C. Nickels and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

4:10        Finding Serenity: Coping with Trauma

Justin J. Cox and Travis Langley, Ph.D. 

Henderson State University

4:30        'Life's Complaint in Doleful Elegies': Understanding the Emergent Self and the Stretching of Petrarchan Desire in Michael Drayton's Idea

Rachel R. Kelly , Suzanne Tartamella, Ph.D., and David Thomson, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

4:50        Love Psychology: Doctor Who

Madelyn L. Byrd and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 

All Disciplines Poster Session

Garrison Center – Grand Ballroom                                           5:00 PM

2017 AURC Chair:  Brad A. Rowland, Ph.D., Henderson State University

Authors should have poster mounted before 5:00 and should be present at least 30 minutes during the poster session to talk about their work.  Posters should be removed after the banquet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abstracts Listed Alphabetically by First Author

 

Binary liquid-vapor phase diagrams with desktop gas chromatography

Paul Charles Bayliss and Brad A. Rowland, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 

Star Wars: Identity Formation in Collectivistic Cultures

Brittany N. Chilton and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 

Discrimination and Racism in District 9

Brittany A. Freeman and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 

Tilt and Pan Control of an Open Path Diode Laser Spectrometer for Field Use

Alejandra P. Funez and Edmond W. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D.

Harding University

A Solution to the Isochrone Problem:  Classical Trajectories Carrying a Quantum Phase

Wade Garrett and Brad A. Rowland, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 

The Psychology of Emotions and Memory in Artificial Intelligence

Michael D. Gehrke and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 


 

All Disciplines Poster Session

 

James and Erikson Positive View of Religion

Haylee B. Herndon and Paul Williamson, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 

Instrumentation for High Altitude Balloons

Bartosz Kwiecinski and Edmond W. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D.

Harding University

Propagation of hyperbolic secant wave packets: Visualizing the quantum momentum and potential field with numerical analytic continuation

Colton Lechak and Brad A. Rowland, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Determination of Mercury in Living and Non-Living Systems

Cole Parker and T. David Bateman, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

A Mori accurate test

Paige E. Powell and Randy Duncan, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Psychological Effects of Cloning

Paige E. Powell, Jasmine S. Young, and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Dehumanization: Behind the Mask:

Kassie Pruitt and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 

Buck Rogers & Coping Mechanisms

Brandon M. Rimmer and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Temperature Control of Gas Chromatography Columns

Adria A. Villafranca and Edmond W. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D.

Harding University

Doctor Who: A Study of Companionship

Faith A. Whiteside and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University


 

All Disciplines Poster Session

 

The Psychological Effects of Cloning

Jasmine S. Young, Paige E. Powell, and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday Oral Sessions Begin at 8:30 AM

Session 3   Basic and Applied Sciences Part 2                 Reynolds 322

Chairperson:      TBD, Henderson State University

8:30        Building a Robust High Powered Rocket

 

Stephanie R. King and Edmund W. Wilson, Ph.D.

Harding University

8:50        Compositional Analysis of Pottery from Tecualtitan, Jalisco

Katherine M. Sargent and Wesley D. Stoner, Ph.D. 

University of Arkansas--Fayetteville

9:10        Designing a High-Power Rocket for Level 1 Certification in the National Rocket Association

Robert M. McPherson and Edmund W. Wilson, Ph.D.

Arkansas State University

Break 9:30 – 9:40

9:40        The Effects of ADHD on Activity Preference and Video Game Performance

 

Jasmine S. Young and Emile Beltzer, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

10:00     Tramadol Analogs as Possible Cancer Therapy

 

David May, Jr. and T. David Bateman, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

10:20    

Complete Listing of Abstracts

 

Listed alphabetically by last name of first author

 

Binary liquid-vapor phase diagrams with desktop gas chromatography

Paul Charles Bayliss, T. David Bateman, Ph.D., and Brad A. Rowland, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

In this study, a new technique for obtaining binary liquid-vapor phase diagrams for Physical Chemistry Laboratory is proposed. An apparatus similar to that of J. McCormick from the University of Kansas was devised to collect both liquid and vapor fractions at several different compositions. This technique, however, differs in that there is no reliance upon refractometry to determine the composition of the liquid and vapor phases. Rather, Vernier's tabletop Gas Chromatograph is utilized to quickly resolve the composition of the phases. Boiling points and peak integrations and retention times are recorded by the student and a binary liquid-phase diagram can easily be constructed in Excel. Results are encouraging for ideal systems (for example, cyclohexane and toluene) and further investigation is ongoing for non-ideal systems which display azeotropes (for example, diethyl ether and cyclohexane). This experiment is now in the rotation of physical chemistry laboratories at Henderson State, as it gives students experience working with modern instrumentation while doing a classic investigation.

 

Love Psychology in Doctor Who

Madelyn L. Byrd and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Love is defined as a deep feeling of affection to someone or something that one loves. The person feels a deep romantic or sexual attraction to someone. Robert Sternberg, an American Psychologist, developed a theory called Theory of Love. In the theory he mentions three components in which are intimacy, passion, and commitment. In the show Doctor Who, the doctor is a man (alien) who travels around space, dimensions, and timelines. River Song was sent out to kill the Doctor, however, she decided to give him her regeneration so he could live, after River Song becomes his wife. She soon falls in love with the doctor and he started to recognize her less and less throughout the doctor transformations. The Doctor was in love with one companion in particular named Rose. Does River Song truly love him, or is it an obsession. What is different between Rose and River? The paper will separate love vs obsession and if cognitive dissonance has an effect as well along with the psychological and biological effects to the body.

Star Wars: Identity Formation in Collectivistic Cultures

Brittany N. Chilton and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Throughout the Star Wars universe as well as many organizations and places in history, depersonalization and dehumanization are used as tools to control and manipulate others into compliance. Depersonalization can be defined as becoming a detached observer of one’s own mind or body; dehumanization is depriving a person of individuality and positive human qualities. Clone troopers are raised from birth to be expendable, faceless soldiers; despite this, they still form their own identities, and express their identities through customized armor and nicknames. The Jedi strive to be collectivistic, with a code demanding humility and the casting off of all selfishness in order to serve the galaxy. This paper will focus on how individuals form their own identities despite being raised in collectivistic cultures, and how characters in the Star Wars universe resist dehumanization and depersonalization.

Synthesis and analysis of tautomerically ambiguous cytosine-based analogs to induce viral mutagenesis

Carlie M. Clem and Vincent K. Dunlap, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Harmful viruses have posed a threat to the human race for generations. In particular, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been notably damaging to the individual and society alike. Although drugs to treat HIV exist, they are harsh and often result in negative side effects. The low fidelity replication enzymes that the virus replicates with contributes to the relative success of the virus’s ability to evade antiviral medications, but can be exploited to develop new antiviral agents. This research focuses on viral mutagenesis, or the introduction of intentional errors in the genome of the virus. These resulting mutations will lead the DNA to reach error catastrophe and ablate. The method by which error will occur is the assimilation of synthesized cytosine based nucleosides with ambiguous hydrogen bonding faces resulting from tautomeric shift. These shifts will lead to the mispairing of DNA and a decrease in stability of the duplex molecule. Presented here are the details of the designed nucleosides’ synthesis and spectroscopy, thermal stability of oligomers containing the nucleosides, and biological assays to demonstrate efficacy.

Finding Serenity: Coping with Trauma

Justin J. Cox and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Posttraumatic stress disorder affects more than three million Americans each year. The American Psychological Association has defined trauma as an "emotional response to a terrible event." We all deal with trauma and must learn to cope. People try a variety of strategies and behaviors intended consciously or unconsciously to alleviate distress, including the defense mechanisms originally identified by Sigmund Freud and elaborated upon by others. Counselors, therapists, friends, family, and others in our lives help us learn coping behaviors, some of which are healthy and some of which are not. The current presentation will feature "case studies" of fictional characters from television programs Firefly and Jessica Jones in order to demonstrate examples of effective and ineffective coping attempts, the motivations behind them, and who we learn them from.

Fully Automated Mars Rover

Alex Cutsinger and Kevin Lewelling, Ph.D.

University of Arkansas—Fort Smith

This presentation will describe two one hundred pound electric Mars rovers designed for remote sensing and data collection. These rovers are being retrofitted to incorporate motor encoders, GPS, HD cameras, and LIDAR that will enable selfguidance. The key to robust autonomous guidance is a proper balance between all four of these sensors; the LIDAR unit will be revolving and give an overall view of the rover’s surroundings allowing general direction decisions to be made. The HD camera will be used identify color and shape of objects in the rover’s path. Distance information gained from the LIDAR unit will be used in conjunction with the motor encoders to mover the rover precise distances and directions. This research and presentation will focus on the proper use of sensory feedback to obtain autonomous rover guidance.


 

Math Anxiety and Cortisol as a Biomarker

M. Allie Davis and T. David Bateman, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Generalized test anxiety and math anxiety are documented disorders that are especially prevalent amongst college students.  College algebra has been proven to be the class most indicative of continued success in college, and by extension success in science, technology, engineering, and mathematic (STEM) career fields.  The demand for STEM graduates is at an all-time high and is only continuing to increase, so it is necessary to both produce and retain STEM majors in their respective programs.  The purpose of this study is to quantify math test anxiety in students enrolled in intermediate algebra courses and to formulate different coping, studying, and teaching methods in order to improve student performance and reduce stress levels in order to increase student persistence in STEM degree tracks.  Many methods to alleviate student test anxiety have been proposed, but no studies exist that connect the proposed methods to their effectiveness as measured by biological assays.  Such studies could serve as a monumental gauge of methods intended to assuage student math and test anxiety.  From saliva collected from the students at chosen intervals, cortisol levels were measured and used as a stress biomarker through the implementation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).  Our initial analyses are indicative that cortisol levels are heightened after the subjects attend the intermediate algebra class, which does agree with the hypothesis initially postulated.  Further study will need to be conducted in order to confirm the results initially derived, but early outcomes are promising.

 

Discrimination and Racism in District 9

Brittany A. Freeman and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Prejudice is a belief or idea that negatively portrays a group of individuals whereas racism and discrimination occur when these beliefs are acted upon. The movie District 9 demonstrates what could happen if an alien species came to Earth and were not hostile. In the movie it shows humans’ strong hate toward the new species despite their peaceful nature. Using examples from this movie, this paper will apply evolutionary psychology to explain the origin of racism and why it was a part of our evolution. Using social psychology, this paper will explain why racism is still present in today’s society and will explain the social and psychological effects racism has on its victims.

Tilt and Pan Control of an Open Path Diode Laser Spectrometer for Field Use

Alejandra P. Funez and Edmond W. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D.

Harding University

After one failed attempt, a more robust design for the aiming of an open path diode laser spectrometer has been accomplished using worm and worm gears, stepper motors and stepper motor drive circuits. The advantage of a worm gear arrangement is that when the power is turned off, the friction against movement of the turning shaft is extremely large thereby locking the device in place without having to keep the power on. With modern electronics, it is possible to reduce the minimum step of the motors from 1.8 degrees per step to many times smaller by microstepping. The new design and programs created allow for better use of the spectrometer to survey large areas with high resolution.


 

A Solution to the Isochrone Problem:  Classical Trajectories Carrying a Quantum Phase Wade Garrett and Brad A. Rowland, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

We propose a novel methodology for solving the isochrone problem for one-dimensional barrier scattering processes with complex quantum trajectories. The isochrone problem arises as one does not know the initial starting points for quantum trajectories in the complex plane. Utilizing an Arbitrary Langrangian-Eulerian frame, we select points along the real axis at the time of interest and evolve classical trajectories backwards in time to the starting positions. This gives us an approximate isochrone for the problem. We then propagate classical trajectories carrying a quantum phase forward in time to realize the transmitted wavepacket. In this work we calculate transmission probabilities for the Eckart barrier and compare these values with those obtained

from prior work done by Rowland and Wyatt.

 

The Psychology of Emotions and Memory in Artificial Intelligence

Michael D. Gehrke and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

The robotics industry is a rapidly growing field in society today. With these advances, the need to study human emotion is prevalent in the relationship between artificial emotion and memory in upcoming artificial intelligence (AI). Past research on human temperament, personality, mood, and motivation will provide insight regarding artificial emotion. The role that emotions play in determining the ability to recall a stored memory for humans may or may not predict how AI will operate. Dr. Anthony G. Francis's and Ashwin Ran's research on experience-based agency of AI as well as Dr. Francis's work with making "emotional" artificial intelligence will provide a basis for this discussion. Throughout the Star Wars universe, the potential for artificial intelligence truly shines. It easily demonstrates how AI of the future might evolve emotions but also how they actively react to these emotions daily.

Atomic Robo:  Artificial Intelligence and Decision Making

Dax W. Guilliams and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Why do we make the decisions we make? Can AI make the same decisions as humans? In the comic book series Atomic Robo, the character Atomic Robo has been a self-aware robot who has developed a personality while making his own decisions. By being granted certain freedoms, Atomic Robo is allowed to choose his own path which has led to the character choosing certain behaviors and also experiencing a wide variety of emotions. Atomic Robo has many volumes of comics to analyze and with each comic, more of the character's personality develops. Topics that will be analyzed include the uniqueness of Atomic Robo's behavior, whether the decisions he makes are based on his individual initiative or from outside stimuli, how his environment has affected his decision-making, and more. Relevant psychological issues include Nature vs Nurture, decision trees, and cognitive information processing.


 

James and Erikson Positive View of Religion

Haylee B. Herndon and Paul Williamson, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

William James and Erik Erikson were American psychologists who influenced the world of psychology through two different avenues, but their ideas of the benefits of religion correlated. James was never very interested in psychology until he picked up a book of philosophy. On the other hand, Erikson jumped right into the psychology field by studying child development and psychoanalysis. Many psychologists at the time thought very negatively of religion; for example, Freud thought of religion as an “illusion”. During William James’ years studying religion, he wrote the book The Varieties of Religious Experience. In his lectures he addressed many different ideas of religion: healthy-mindedness, sick soul, divided self, and conversion. He also spoke of their effects on the mind. In summary, he spoke of religion as a way to improve one’s psychological state. Like James, Erik Erikson had a similar idea. Erikson studied different religions and decided that religion helped the innermost being form and heal. He saw a larger need for individuals to follow a religion of choice. With two different areas of study and two completely different pasts, James and Erikson both proposed the idea that religion played a positive role on the human mind.

'Life's Complaint in Doleful Elegies': Understanding the Emergent Self and the Stretching of Petrarchan Desire in Michael Drayton's Idea

Rachel R. Kelley, Suzanne Tartamella, Ph.D., and David Thomson, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

This research looks at Michael Drayton’s sonnet sequence Idea as a means of self-exploration. By analyzing various sonnets within Idea and comparing them to other contemporary sequences, and by reexamining established scholarship, the goal of this study is to show how Drayton adheres to many conventions of Petrarchism yet manages to create within his sequence an abstraction of what had previously been a concrete concept of Petrarchan love. Though his contemporary sonneteers used the Petrarchan lady as a metaphor for other desires, Drayton uses it as a means of gaining an internal awareness as opposed to satisfying external passions. While previous research holds Drayton as a minor poet of the Renaissance, this project highlights the importance of his Idea not only to the genre of Elizabethan sonnet sequences but to a broader understanding of self-realization in English literature as a whole.

 

Building a Robust High Powered Rocket

Stephanie R. King and Edmond W. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D.

Harding University

In order to achieve Level 1 Certification by the National Association of Rocketry (NAR), a high powered rocket must be built, flown and recovered in flight reusable condition. Many of the failures of these rockets are the loss of fins broken off in a landing. It is difficult to attach the fins in an attractive manner and, at the same time, make them crash proof. Using SolidWorks 3D software and additive manufacturing technology, an airframe attachment was designed to greatly reduce the chance of fins coming loose upon impact. At the same time, the expense was kept low. The results of our project will be shown and discussed.


 

Instrumentation for High Altitude Balloons

Bartosz Kwiecinski and Edmond W. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D.

Harding University

High altitude balloons have many advantages as carriers for science observation platforms for Earth observing instrumentation. Our team is building a versatile science payload to be used on high altitude balloons flown by the Arkansas BalloonSat program at Arkansas State University. As a beginning step we are testing sensors for temperature, altitude, and pressure. Also to be included in the basic payload are geo-positioning indicators and accelerometers. This report gives the results to date for our progress.

Propagation of hyperbolic secant wave packets: Visualizing the quantum momentum and potential field with numerical analytic continuation

Colton Lechak and Brad A. Rowland, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Recent work has demonstrated that hyperbolic secant wave packets develop an infinite series of nodes when undergoing evolution via the time-dependent Schrodinger Equation in a potential-less environment. This was unheard of in quantum chemistry circles as the most widely utilized wave packet, the Gaussian, does not demonstrate this behavior during free evolution. We have found that wave packets of the form Ψ(x) = 1/(xn+1), where n = even also develop nodes during free evolution. Prior work has demonstrated that the dynamics of wave packets in the complex plane can yield insight into evolving features in the wave packet on the real axis (i.e. nodes). To study the potential origin and evolution of these nodes, a numerical technique known as numerical analytic continuation has been utilized and has yielded great insight into how the poles in the quantum potential are developing in the complex plane and then transiting onto the real-axis, where they appear as nodes in the wave packet . The dynamics of these poles have been examined by making a Pólya map of the quantum momentum field.

The Dark Side of Altruism

Brian G. Lott and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

When social psychology studies altruism it attempts to discern contingent motivations behind altruistic behaviors rather than study selfless acts themselves. What antecedents drive someone to sacrifice his or her life for another? Neurological, biological, and social norms can sufficiently hypothesize many altruistic motivators, but theorists often eschew a potential motivator that frequently equates to altruism’s opposite—spite. Case studies of famous fictional characters can help demonstrate the potential of spite as a motivator for altruistic behavior. A recent sci-fi film abundant with self-sacrificial behavior, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, offers a plethora of altruism examples, but perhaps more uniquely, it exhibits where spite may be a core motivator. Without benevolence as a factor, some characters would not have willingly sacrificed their lives to destroy their enemies, and without the drive to spite their enemies, they likely would not have engaged in sacrificial behavior for the well-being of others. Case studies from this and other fictional works bring up debates on the existence of altruism offer opportunities to analyze antecedents and consequences of seemingly altruistic behaviors as well as study behaviors with evidence of spite as a motivational force. Like with Star Wars’ Force, sometimes the most seemingly charitable action has its light and dark side.


 

Tramadol Analogs as Possible Cancer Therapy

David May, Jr. and T. David Bateman, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

It has been shown that µ-opioid agonists display a range of activities beyond anti-nociception. One agonist, tramadol, displays anti-microbial activity, which leads us to hypothesize that it may be a privileged structure with multiple activities. To test this, analogs of tramadol’s opioid structure are made in a two-step synthesis.  First, a methyl-amine is added to an alpha carbon of a cyclic ketone by Mannich reaction. Second, the ketone is converted to a tertiary alcohol by Grignard Reaction. The final products will then be tested against K562 Leukemia cells for anti-tumor activity. Long term goals of this project include lead identification of a natural product in cancer research, as well as introducing biochemistry and organic chemistry students to research by performing cell-death assays and simple synthesis of analogs, respectively, and fostering an interdisciplinary cooperation between the biology and chemistry departments.  

Designing a High-Power Rocket for Level 1 Certification in the National Rocket Association

Robert M. McPherson and Edmond W. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D.

Harding University

In order to achieve high powered rocket certification by the National Association of Rocketry (NAR), a high powered rocket must be built, flown safely, and recovered in a state where it can be flown again without repair. The steps required to carry this project out successfully require use of flight simulation software and mechanical skills that will be explained in this presentation.

Dracula and the Art of War

Cameron C. Nickels and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Sun Tzu, best known as the author of The Art of War, and Vlad Tepes, best known as the historical inspiration for the fictional character Dracula, each held strong views regarding combat and how to wage war through mental manipulation of one’s enemies. Long before psychology existed, both became masters of psychological warfare. Sun Tzu outlined his basis for psychological warfare and wrote on how he applied his own outlines to win battles that he would not normally have been able to win. Vlad Tepes practiced psychological warfare both in and out of the battlefield. This paper looks at their strategies, methods, and influence upon both their own soldiers and those of their foes as well as the psychological tactics that they employed to guarantee victory.


 

New and Noteworthy Vascular Plant Records from Arkansas

Brook Olson, Megan Stone, Keenan Servis, James Peck, and Brett Serviss, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

In 2016, a total of 18 species of non-native vascular plants were documented for a first or second occurrence in the Arkansas flora. Fifteen species: Camellia sasanqua Thunb., Crocus flavus West., Ficus carica L., Hosta lancifolia Engl., Hydrangea macrophylla (Thunb.) Ser., Ilex crenata Thunb., Kerria japonica (L.) DC., Liriope graminifolia (L.) Baker, Liriope muscari (Dcne.) L. H. Bailey, Narcissus papyraceus Ker-Gawl., Narcissus Xtenuior Curt., Ophiopogon japonicus (Thunb.) Ker-Gawl., Podocarpus macrophyllus (Thunb.) Sweet, Syringa vulgaris L., and Ulmus parvifolia Jacq., are reported here as new to the flora of Arkansas. These records represent the first voucher specimen-based documentation of these species outside of cultivation in the state. Camellia, Crocus, Ficus, Hosta, Kerria, Ophiopogon, Podocarpus, and Syringa are the first documented occurrences of these genera in the state’s flora outside of cultivation. The Podocarpus macrophyllus record represents the first documentation of the Podocarpaceae family in the state’s flora. Canna indica L., Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl, and Pyracantha koidzumii (Hayata) Rehd. are documented for only their second occurrences in the state. Two additional species, Nerium oleander L. and Punica granatum L., are re-affirmed as components of the flora.

Determination of Mercury in Living and Non-Living Systems

Cole Parker and T. David Bateman, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Mercury is a common toxin found throughout Arkansas’s water systems. It is readily absorbed by organisms, and is transferred up the food chain by a process known as bioaccumulation. In accordance with the accumulation process, tertiary predators such as otters were used to correlate mercury levels to locations throughout the state of Arkansas. Various samples were collected from different sites across the state, and their respective liver, brain, and fur samples were analyzed for mercury. The overall objective of the research is to obtain an accurate measure of mercury within tertiary predators, and display the data in a manner that is presentable to the general public. The relative mercury levels will be used to construct a map of mercury hot spots throughout the state that will be accessible for edit by groups conducting similar research.

A Mori accurate test

Paige E. Powell and Randy Duncan, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

The Bechdel test was created to gauge how women are include in the plot and how sexist a movie is. The criteria required that there be at least two women who talk to each other about something besides a man and that a woman had to be a named character, but in modern day plots, it seems that the Bechdel test is less relevant than when first introduced. At the time of its introduction these guidelines were strict, but now they have used this to get easy approval from the masses. The problem with this is a character can be the well-rounded and developed character, but the mention of a man could make her less credible. The test is too vague for describing what is admissible as a positive role for a woman. Considering that this test came out in 1985 it is no surprise that it is a bit outdated in meeting today’s standards. On the other hand, the Mako Mori test that came out in 2013 is better suited to gauge a woman’s role in the plot. This newer test expects there to be at least one female character who gets her own narrative arc that is not about supporting a man’s story. Both test will be applied to several contemporary comics and the results of the Bechdel test will be analyzed against the results of the Mako Mori test. By comparing the two test, the expected result is to find principles that expect more substance from female characters who will be integral parts of the plot and in turn prove that the Bechdel test and its maltreatment are out of date and overpromoted.


 

Psychological Effects of Cloning

Paige E. Powell, Jasmine S. Young, and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

The most famous cloning experiment occurred in the 1990's when Dolly the sheep was cloned. Today we have made progress with primate cloning the next big step is to clone humans. The ethical issues of cloning are the primary focus of most, but more concern should fall on the psychological effects. Identity and individuality issues occur between clones just as found in twin studies. The clones struggle with their self-worth/ importance knowing they are not the only version of themselves. Knowing that they are a clone has caused depression which is from predisposed expectations of what they should be not of who they are. Looking at Paul Anderson's Resident Evil and Graeme Manson's Orphan Black to discuss the ramifications of human cloning on mental health.

 

Dehumanization: Behind the Mask:

Kassie Pruitt and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Dehumanization is used to describe someone who acts inhumanely towards humans. A more in depth description of Dehumanization, or an act thereof can describe a behavior or process that undermines individuality of and in others. Behaviorally, dehumanization describes a disposition towards others. People's aggression can also increase when they feel anonymous, for example if they wear a uniform, hood or mask, Zimbardo said. "You minimize social responsibility," he explained. "Nobody knows who you are, so therefore you are not individually liable”. Throughout the StarWars series, Darth Vader has done many inhumane things. Most of these acts committed while wearing a mask. Does the character or person, wearing the mask feel less liable, heightening the severity of their acts? Wearing a mask could cause someone to experience effects of dehumanization, whether that's a fictional character such as Darth Vader or an athlete wearing a helmet.

Buck Rogers & Coping Mechanisms

Brandon M. Rimmer and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Coping mechanisms are prominently seen in the fictional character, Buck Rogers. Coping mechanisms like adaptation, altruism, identification, and post-traumatic growth can all be seen in how Buck deals with waking up five hundred years in the future. Coping mechanisms are techniques people use to deal with the stress the outside world puts on them. Looking at different versions of this character, the original novella, Armageddon 2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan, the original comic strip, and film and television series, and comparing Buck's actions to that of a prisoner who has been released after years of incarceration and coma patients that have come out of their conditions. Looking at this character and real world examples, to better understand different coping mechanisms and how people deal with stressful situations and adapt to unfamiliar worlds that are somewhat strange and new.


 

Compositional Analysis of Pottery from Tecualtitan, Jalisco

Katherine M. Sargent and Wesley D. Stoner, Ph.D.

University of Arkansas--Fayetteville

This project explores pottery production at the site of Tecualtitán I, located in the Mexican state of Jalisco. The project centers on the combination of three different analytical techniques commonly used on ceramics: neutron activation analysis (NAA), petrography, and traditional attribute analysis. The site is a small habitational site in the Lerma River Basin, north of Lake Chapala, roughly in the center of Jalisco. The attribute analysis yielded provisional types. The correlation of these provisional types with existing types across the region allowed the site to be dated to the Classic (300-900 AD). The chemical and mineral compositional analyses revealed that, although the majority of the pottery in the sample was locally produced, there is evidence of exchange with a region approximately 100 kilometers to the south.

Mind-Body:  Cloud Atlas

Darian Sisson and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

The mind and the body, although connected by flesh, are not identical. One of the classic debates in philosophy and "early" psychology was over wither Mind and body are separate or not. Dualism was the view that they were separate. That is not the modern view, but it is consistent with worldwide beliefs in reincarnation. The novel and film Cloud Atlas explore this relationship through the viewpoints of characters over the course of many generations. Psychological concepts from the past (dualism) and future (quantum psychology) are used to analyze these characters.

Liriope and Ophiopogon: overview of two genera of Ruscaceae naturalized in the Arkansas flora

Megan Stone, Brook Olson, Keenan Serviss, James Peck, Cynthia Fuller, Ph.D., and James Engman, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Liriope graminifolia (L.) Baker, Liriope muscari (Dcne.) L.H. Bailey, and Ophiopogon japonicus (Thunb.) Ker–Gawl. are newly documented as naturalized in the Arkansas flora. Our record of L. graminifolia apparently is only the second documented occurrence of this species outside of cultivation in the USA. Thirteen distinct colonies of L. graminifolia, ranging from about a half–dozen plants to 100s of individuals and/or ramets, were discovered along a 3/10 of a mile (530 m) stretch of a small stream in a highly disturbed riparian habitat in Pulaski County. The Pulaski County location is bordered on two sides by residential areas. Two additional escaped occurrences of L. graminifolia in Clark County also are documented. Naturalized plants of L. muscari are documented from Clark, Garland, and Pulaski counties. The O. japonicus records represent the first documented occurrence of the genus Ophiopogon in the state outside of cultivation and naturalized. Seven distinct populations of O. japonicus, ranging from about 10 plants to 100s of individuals and/or ramets, were discovered along a ca. 3/10 of a mile (530 m) stretch of a small, intermittent stream in a disturbed riparian habitat in Clark County, Arkansas. An additional small population of O. japonicus was documented along a second, distinct riparian zone, which is separated from the preceding by over 2 km. A number of other occurrences of naturalized plants of O. japonicus have been documented from Clark County. Naturalized plants of O. japonicus also were documented from Garland and Pulaski counties. Naturalized plants and populations of L. spicata Lour. are documented from several locations in Clark, Garland, Hot Spring, and Pulaski counties, and with the exception of Pulaski County, these represent new county records for this species. Based on these observations, it is reasonable to surmise that species of Liriope and Ophiopogon are considerably more widespread in the state than previous records indicate. Notes on both genera in Arkansas are provided.


 

Temperature Control of Gas Chromatography Columns

Adria A. Villafranca and Edmond W. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D.

Harding University

A new design for a more compact gas chromatograph is being designed, built and tested. The columns for the chromatograph will be contained individually in an aluminum enclosure and equipped with both heating and cooling elements. Each column can be programmed for isothermal temperature control or different temperature profile programs may be utilized. The results of this project to date will be presented.

 

Doctor Who: A Study of Companionship

Faith A. Whiteside and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Companionship is found among individuals who have a mature attachment to each other and love and respect one another. This love can be either platonic or romantic. The Doctor from the long running television show, Doctor Who, is an alien Timelord who can travel through time and space. Along the way, he picks up travel companions whom he takes along on all of his adventures. This project discusses why an individual who can travel through time and space would feel the need to have a companion and what the different companions offer him based on what point he is at in his story line. The project will focus mainly on morality and humanity.

Investigation on feature detection and description for on-device mobile landmark recognition

Yida Xu, Yancheng Li, Kaiman Zeng, Ph.D., and Nansong Wu, Ph.D.

Arkansas Tech University

With the rapid development of intelligent mobile and wearable devices, applications on landmark recognition attract increasingly attentions from industry and academia. A typical scenario of landmark recognition would be a visitor initializes a query by pointing the camera phone at a landmark location. Then, the landmark is recognized and related information is returned. This research focuses on two major phases in mobile landmark recognition: feature detection and feature description. We present an efficient landmark feature detector and descriptor based on the Speeded Up Robust Features. The proposed detector identifies the salient keypoint through Hessian operator. The descriptor is formed by fusion of a compact context and visual features. The performance is evaluated on a dataset of real world landmark images taken in the Arkansas Tech University campus. Each landmark location is captured with multiple shots from different viewpoints, and under different lighting condition. Experimental results of image feature matching demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

 


 

The Effects of ADHD on Activity Preference and Video Game Performance

Jasmine S. Young and Emile Beltzer, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

This study will address the effects of ADHD on activity preference and Videogame performance as compared to those without ADHD. A total of 100 undergraduate college students that attend Henderson State University will be used to conduct this study. One group will consist of 50 students that have ADHD and as a control group 50 students without ADHD to compare data. The participants in each group are required to have experience playing video games, own a video game system (Xbox 360, Xbox one, PlayStation 3 or 4), and engage in other activities as well. Participants are screened for ADHD symptoms using two questionnaires: ADHD Screening Questionnaire and a DSM-IV ADHD Symptom Rating Scale. A Perceived Task Stimulation Scale, Activities measure and Motivation for Video Game Use Scale will also be given. The last two tasks given to participants will assess their video game performance by testing their reaction time and the speed at which they can process sensory information. Both of these tasks are to be completed using programs via the computer. The first computer test given is the Color Word Stroop Test with Keyboard Responding (English) were participants would need to name the color of the word. The participant will need to pay attention to what color each word is instead of what color the word reads. The next test given on the computer will be the Deary-Liewald reaction time task which measures response time. It is expected that participants with ADHD do prefer video games but do not perform as well as those without ADHD. This research will attempt to explain how the different skill sets needed for video games work against those with ADHD affecting their performance and why they prefer them.

The Psychological Effects of Cloning

Jasmine S. Young, Paige E. Powell, and Travis Langley, Ph.D.

Henderson State University

Ever since scientists closed Dolly the sheep in 1996, a growing number of mammal species have been cloned as well. Attempts at primate cloning are in the works, and human cloning appears inevitable. Each clone is an independent organism. The fact that each is genetically identical to someone else provides unique opportunities to study the relative influences of nature and nurture. Even twins separated at birth share the same biological influences prenatally, but clones typically do not. Identity and individuality issues between human clones may be similar to those identified in twin studies. Will clones struggle with issues of self-worth or the importance of knowing themselves as unique human beings? Paul Anderson’s Resident Evil films and Graeme Manson’s Orphan Black television series both explore the ramifications of human cloning on mental health.